Each week, Eric Rhoads answers two art marketing questions from listeners like you during the Marketing Minute Podcast. Browse the marketing minutes here to learn tips on how to sell more art.

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 67

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads answers: “Should I frame my art before it’s sold?” and “Are online art competitions worth it?”

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 67 >

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

In the Marketing Minute I try to answer your art marketing questions email yours to me, [email protected] and I don’t formulate answers before I read the questions. I take it off the top of my head sometimes I mess up so I apologize in advance. Here’s a question from amber Marie in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, and she asks Should I frame my art before it’s sold? Well, I yeah. Yeah, absolutely. Amber and the reason is, why do people drive beautiful cars. Some people drive beautiful cars. And it to me it’s like a picture frame. You know, it makes you look good. A frame just really makes a picture look good. And if you’re from Aim it properly. If you learn to frame properly, you get a good looking frame, you get a high quality frame and you get the right color frame for the color of your painting. It’ll really stand out and I’m sitting here I’m in my studio, and I’ve got a lot of framed pictures around me. And the frames just really make them I’ve got a bunch of pictures sitting around that are not framed yet, when I put them in frames, it just makes them better. And though you’re going to spend some money on a frame, it’s probably going to bring the value of the overall package up higher people. All not all people are capable of envisioning what something might look like. And so if they can envision it framed great, but most people, you just put it in a frame, and of course that they don’t want that frame. They want a different color frame, train them up a frame or give them a better frame. I have a story. years ago, I was talking to an art dealer in North Carolina. I won’t mention names, but he he called me and we were chatting about a bunch of stuff. And he said, You know, I learned an interesting lesson today. I said, What’s that? He said, Well, about three weeks ago, he said I had this painting that was sitting in the gallery said that painting, it was a good painting. I always liked it. I never could understand why it didn’t sell. And it sat in the gallery unsold for about a year. He said I was getting ready to pack it up and send it back to the artist and I thought you know what, I think it’s the frame. So he said, I shipped it off to my frame maker. He said I put an expensive frame on it. Like a 20 $800 frame. He said I had this, this painting for sale for I don’t remember the numbers, I’ll make something up. But he said I had it for sale for like $2,000 and it didn’t sell. So I put it in a 20 $500 frame and I put the price up to $15,000. He said sold the first week. He said a frame really can make a difference. And so I think that probably is a great lesson Amber. And that is framing really makes a difference. Now most of us can’t afford to put 20 $500 frames on things. You can get some beautiful frames for 50 or 100 bucks. And it will make a difference just add the frame cost in two, the cost of the painting that is sold. I also I know this sounds a little creepy and weird. But I think that it’s a I think I like to show paintings on the website that are framed. Now I think it’s okay to show them unframed and framed but so they can get a feel for it. Some software allows you to click through and show different frames. So that’s pretty cool. Anyway, we have a lot of framers in Plein Air Magazine by the way.

Here’s a question from Cameron Esrock of Prominence Rhode Island who asks, Are online art competitions worth it? Well, Cameron, I got to tell you right up front, I have a conflict of interest in answering this question because I run an online art competition called the plein air salon. But let me tell you what I think about it and just know that my answers might be a little jaded, or maybe a little influenced by the fact that I have a competition. But one of the reasons I have a competition is I was talking to Peter Adams and Elaine Adams from the California art club. And they do the California art Club Gold Medal awards. And I was talking to them and they said, you know, when we implemented this Gold Medal Award, it started raising the quality of the artwork. Over time, when we first started it, things weren’t as good. But as people started realizing they were competing with other artists, they started getting better and better and better and better. And as a result, they’ve lifted the quality overall. And and the thing that I think is important about this is there’s something a switch that kind of clicks inside of you, when you put yourself into a competition, now you’re going to try a little bit harder, you’re not going to put something in that competition that isn’t isn’t your best work, you’re going to put your best foot forward. And so that kind of it’s kind of puts you into a, let’s say, a professional mode. Now, it’s nice to get that validation. You know, you always get compliments from your mother and your friends and things about what wonderful paintings you have. But the validation of knowing that a national celebrity judge, like a art gallery owner has picked your painting. That’s very, really a good feeling. But also, there’s a side benefit to that if you get picked into a competition, even if you’re a finalist, you have things to put on your resume things to talk about on your website, things your art dealer can talk about. And if you win the prize, that’s even more you can do press releases about it, you might be able to do a lot of press things based on that, you know, we highly recommend that take advantage of it. And there’s something that happens you know, whenever somebody has won the grand prize, or oftentimes even been finalists top two three in the plein air salon competition. These people are hearing from art galleries. Want to carry them? I’ve had people say they were able to upgrade to better art galleries. As a result, they started getting invited to events as a featured artist. And there’s a lot of other benefits like that. So I think it really helps your career. But the best part about it is it puts your head in the game and you want to have your head in the game. Anyway, I think that answers that particular question.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.


> Visit EricRhoads.com (Publisher of ArtMarketing.com) to learn about opportunities for artists and art collectors, including:

  • Art retreats
  • International art trips
  • Art conventions
  • Art workshops (in person and online)
  • And more!
By |2021-04-29T07:22:48-04:00May 10th, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 66

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains how to set reasonable art goals, and how to get more recognition as an artist.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 66 >

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRNE–akTf8&feature=youtu.be

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

In the marketing minute I answer your marketing questions you can email yours to me at actually [email protected] So here’s a question from Jay Taylor in Arveda, Colorado, Jay says as we wrap up the year and look forward to the next I’d like to get some art goals. But I don’t know what they should be. What are some reasonable goals we can set as we look forward to next year? Well, Jay, I recommend everybody sequester themselves and set their goals between Christmas and New Years Take, take it seriously. If you actually want to hit goals, if you actually want to accomplish something, it takes planning, it’s not something you just go, Hey, here’s a couple of cool goals. And then you announce them on January 1, and then you’ve you’ve blown them by February 1, right? So you want to actually take some time and and all great goals are measurable. All right. measurable means you need to be able to know if you’ve accomplished them. And so you want to you want to do your goals in that way. So I can’t pick what are good goals for you. I can give you some general things that artists and others might be thinking about. I don’t know what your goals are going to be. And quite frankly, if they’re not your own goals, you’re not going to hit them. You got to believe in them. You got to think about them. You got to constantly monitor your goals. I talked a lot about this and Sunday coffee, my my blog and I also talked about it in art marketing comm a lot of goal setting is very important to me. I set my goals for 2021 back in September. I have big four days. have meetings with my team for goal setting, because that’s how important it is. And we monitor those goals every single week, we have a meeting as a team. And we go through the goals and we say, Okay, here are our goals for the quarter. How are we doing here are goals for the year? How are we doing? What are the steps, we make sub goals, steps, you know, they say the best way to eat an elephant is one bite at a time, right? So you’ve got to take that elephant and break it up into, you know, monthly goals, and then weekly goals and sometimes even daily goals. And you’ve got to pay attention to them. And you’ve got to take the steps. Because if you don’t take the steps, you won’t hit the goals. You can’t just say, Alright, I’m making 10,000 a year and I’m now I want to make 100,000 next year, you know, there’s a there’s positive thinking, and you can think positively about that all day long. But if you don’t have a system in place to hit those goals, you’re not likely to hit it. So here’s some things to think about. Where am I now? And where do I want to be? What is the gap? What you know, how do I get to where I want to be? What are the steps necessary to get there, and then break them down to weekly and monthly and daily and so on? Are my goals realistic and attainable? Are my goals measurable? In other words, measurable goals, let’s say an easy measurable goal is I want to make $100,000 a year. And let’s say $120,000 a year to make this easy. And that means Okay, now the monthly goal is I got to make $12,000 a month well now the weekly goal in that is, you know, you got it, let’s say we’re based on you know, four weeks in a month, it’s probably a little bit different 4.5 weeks or something but so now you got to say, all right, if I got to make $12,000 and I got to make $3,000 a week, well, how do I do that? Well, now I got to say, all right, I got to make how much per day to make 3000 a week. And if you have a monitoring system that you put in place, you know, what am I doing today, to reach that, you know, $500 or $1,000 in sales that I get to get for today or for this week, then you’re going to be thinking about those things. And so you want things measurable now, it’s not just measurable when it’s about money, you need to know other goals and how you hit them. So you might have a goal of buying a new car, while buying a new car might translate back to money. A trip might translate back to money, but some things don’t transfer back to money. For instance. Everybody needs different kinds of goals, like you need family goals. So a family goal might be I’m going to spend, I need to get closer to my kids. Well, how am I going to do that? Well, I’m going to spend one Saturday a month taking my each of my daughters to daddy daughter date or I’m going to spend I did that you know what are the different things that you’re going to do? And you need to break them into goals and monthlies and weeklies and so on, because you need to be able to measure those.

You also have to ask yourself, what are the sacrifices I’m willing to make? You know, because goals require sacrifices, things don’t just happen, you have to you know, if you have to work harder, you might have to paint more, you might have to do more things. And so you’ve got to ask yourself, Am I willing to make those sacrifices? are they worth it? You know, if I’m going to make $120,000 a year, but I’m going to have to work, you know, 10 hours a day in the studio, am I willing to do it Am I going to be you know, able to make the trips, the teaching trips, or whatever it is you’ve got to do. So every goal needs to also then be broken down to what if I hit them? What’s next? You know, what if I hit them early? What’s next? Will my life be better if my goals are accomplished? And do they really have a purpose? Because your goals need to have a purpose, right? If you just say, hey, I want to have a Gulfstream jet. Well, that’s nice, but unless you need it, unless you’re going to use it. If you say to yourself, Well, I’m going to the reason I want that is because I’m going to do these trips, and I need to have personal transportation and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, you know, then you, you might want to have purpose or you know, I do a goal. I want to hit a certain number financially every year because I know I’m going to take 10% of that money. And I want to be able to say look, I’m going to give X amount of dollars to this charity or that charity. So you need to be thinking in terms of that. Anyway, start picturing what your life should be. What is the ideal dream life for you? What do you want it to look like? And then you might not make it in a year, you know, it might take you 20 years, that’s okay, but you’ve just got to take it. So think about your ideal life and say, Okay, what can I accomplish this year and next year and so on, break it into goals that will help you a lot. I hope that’s been helpful for you. Thank you In terms of your dreams, and remember, think in terms of different kinds of goals like financial goals, spiritual goals, family goals, travel goals, painting goals, job goals, etc. You know, you might have a goal, like, I want to retire from my job in five years, and be making the same amount of money. Well, how do you do that? Well, you’ve got to back it up and say, well, you don’t just say, Okay, I’m going to leave in five years and then start my business. Instead, you say, I’m going to start my business and ramp it up over the course of the next five years. So by the time I am out of there, I’ve got the same income. Right? That’s the kind of thing I like to think about.

Here’s a question from Melissa Morris in Overland Park, Kansas. Melissa says, I’m not worried about selling my paintings, because I already have a steady income. But I’d like to get more recognition for my work. What are some ways other than sales that I can validate validate myself as an artist? Well, Melissa, I think that’s a very mature statement. You know, I got a, I do a thing called fall color week and one in the Adirondacks called publishers Invitational. And sometimes I’ll offer to coach people on their marketing during those events, and I remember we were up in Canada, it was snowing, we had a little more time on our hands, because a lot of people didn’t want to go out. And so I offered to do some coaching, one on one coaching, and two different people basically said to me, You know, I want to sell more paintings. And I would say, Well, why. And they started going into it. And I, you know, I identified in both of their cases, that they didn’t need the income, they had the income, they had jobs, so they had money, and they had retirement or whatever, and they didn’t really need. And I and they both, they both said, Well, I thought I was supposed to do that, well, there’s no supposed to the supposed to is you’ve got to do what’s right for you. And for your life. What we identified in both of their cases, is that it was really recognition they wanted, it wasn’t sales, they want it to be recognized. So you’re already on top of this, Melissa? And I think the way to think about it is how do I get recognition? Well, you have to ask yourself, what kind of recognition you want? What kind of recognition is important? And And who do you want it from? So for instance, if if I get recognition from let’s say, my mother, may she rest in peace? When I would, you know, she loved all my paintings, you know, but she loved even though crummy stuff that I did. And so, you know, she’s just always gonna love me and then love what I do. So yeah, it’s nice to have recognition from your mom. But who do you want recognition from? Well, you want recognition from people who are maybe your peers or people who matter to you like, for instance, I had Daniel spiric visiting here in Austin, recently. And Daniel came over to my studio. And you know, when somebody walks into your studio and starts looking around at your paintings, you see them differently through their eyes, because you wonder what they’re thinking. And I showed my self portrait that I did during COVID, first parts of COVID, to Daniel, and he was very complimentary. And I thought, well, that’s, you know, he’s just not making up stuff. Now. He, he saw some of my other work, and he was like, you know, not saying anything. So it’s like, Okay, well, I maybe I didn’t do very well for recognition in that area. But so who matters to you? What kind of recognition Do you want, I like to use my work for charity auctions and silent auctions and helping out at the school and things like that. And to me, if somebody’s bidding on it, and ending up owning it, even if I don’t get the money, that’s recognition, because if people like it, they’re signing up for they want it. I think that’s a great way to get recognition, you know, so think about charities, you can help. I have some rules in my book about if you’re giving things charities, especially if you’re marketing yourself, you you might want to look at that and say, Okay, what else do I want out of that? Do I want publicity? Do I want mail lists? Do I want introductions? You know, I have a set series of things in my book, making more money selling your art, and I talked about that a lot. I think charities are a great way to go whether you’re looking to make money or not. A lot of people don’t like to give up a painting. I’ll give them up all day long. I don’t mind because I use them as tools to help me in other areas. So think about that.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.


> Visit EricRhoads.com (Publisher of ArtMarketing.com) to learn about opportunities for artists and art collectors, including:

  • Art retreats
  • International art trips
  • Art conventions
  • Art workshops (in person and online)
  • And more!
By |2021-04-29T07:22:22-04:00May 3rd, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 65

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads shares ways to make your art website more visible, and get advice on photographing your paintings.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 65 >

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PaUWkUQ9FzY&feature=youtu.be

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

All right, thanks, Jim. In the Marketing Minute I answer your art marketing questions, or at least I try. Sometimes I may fail. I don’t know. email your questions to me, [email protected] Here’s a question from Nick Sorenson. In New York, New York. Nick says I have a website. But how do I make it more visible? I’m assuming Nick, what you mean is by visible? How do you get more people to visit it? I’m guessing that’s the thing. You know, these days a website is kind of like having your name in the phone book. Yeah, if you remember the scene from the Jerk, Steve Martin movie, it was like all excited because his name was in the phonebook. And the reality is back in, if any of you remember phone books back in the day, I guess they still make them back in the day, the idea of having your name in the phone book wasn’t really a very big deal. Now, if you had your name, as a business in the yellow pages, and you were you know, you’re a dentist and people looking up dentist, well, then you’re going to be one of 200 or 300, or 500, or 1000 in there, depending on your city. So having your name in a phone book isn’t all that great. And so, website is just kind of like having your name and a phone book. So now what do you do? Well, everybody’s got a listing, everybody’s got a website. So if you want to be found, you have to find ways to invite people to visit your website. And that’s done through your various marketing efforts. I talked a lot about that stuff in my books, my courses, my videos, etc. And I think you want I think most of us want buyers there. We don’t want tire kickers, if we’re selling workshops, then we want other artists. And so you want to have an appropriate way to invite people now ads are a great way to invite people because ads, basically you can put a call to action in an ad you can show your work. And you can say something, a call to action on your ads is important. You want people to do something, if you don’t tell them to do something, they won’t do it surprisingly. So you’re just assuming they’re going to visit. So you want you want to say something like, visit EricRhoads.com, which you can do, by the way, it’s got a lot of cool stuff there. But if you can say visit Ericrhoads.com for to see, the 10 best paintings I’ve ever done. Or you can have what we call a lead magnet, which is a free, something like a free PDF, you could do like a visit my website to get my my free book on the 50 best paintings I’ve ever done. And, that can be an ebook or something you can put together and it gives people a reason to go. And of course, you want them there and you want them looking around. And the reason you want to do a lead magnet is that advertising is something that everybody needs to do. But you want to have an opportunity to talk to them more frequently. I like the idea of having my own medium, right. So I have my own medium. I have my own magazines, I have newsletters and things like that. But you can have your own newsletter, too. That way, you have a frequent way to talk to them above and beyond your advertising, because once you’ve got their email address, if they give you permission, then you can email them. And of course, that’s very important. You got to have their permission. And so, offering something up in your ads. You want to get people to come to your site and you want to remind them of yourself frequently. And by having their emails you can do that. So that’s a great way you can also drive people through blogs and doing interviews on podcasts. Local media and other things. And always you want your website to be real easy. And if you have a difficult name, it makes it tougher. Now my name isn’t really a difficult name, but everybody spells it differently. You know, some people would say, our h o. d ‘s, there’s no e in my name. And there, some people would say, our ad s and so in my website is our H O. Eric. He, of course, there’s different ways to spell Eric, so I probably should have, a different website name for mine. But, you want something that gives you something easy to access. And remember, and if your name is difficult name or hard to spell, or it pronounces differently than it spells, then you might want to think about a an easy entry, something that’s easy to remember, you know, in my case, it’s er IC r h OADS. With no e.com. And that’s probably something I should work on. They always say the plumber has a leaky faucet.

Anyway, here’s a question from Bruce Hunt in Phoenix, Arizona, who asked, Is it enough to use my own camera to photograph my paintings? Or should I pay someone to do it? And if so, how do I find such a service? I think I want to answer that in a couple of ways for you, Bruce. First off, if you’re a professional artist, you have to act like a professional. And professionals do things differently. And one of the things that they do is they have great photographs of their paintings, great high resolution photographs, well lit, no glare. And you want to have those for a lot of reasons, I judged a lot of contests, I was judging the Art Renewal Center contest recently. And you know, we get to click on images. So we can look at them in more depth than this one, the photograph of one of the paintings that I was looking at was so out of focus, I really didn’t get a good feel for it. And it’s just like, Okay, if the artist can’t really take the trouble to do a good painting, do they really deserve an award. Now, I try not to allow that to influence me. But you know, if it’s hard to see, or if it doesn’t look good, or if it’s got glare on it, and sometimes people put, have sending images that have glare on them, it just isn’t flattering to your image. Also, we all think that we are experts in Photoshop, and so on. But we have, we all have different monitors, and our monitors are calibrated differently. And when this happens to us, an artist will create an ad or they’ll send in an image and the image doesn’t look good to our art director because his his monitor is calibrated. And so they everybody calibrates their, their monitors to look good to them, but they’re not doing it the proper way. And as a result, you’re sending in a dark photo, when you think it’s a light photo or something like that. So having a pro is good, or having a pro teach you a little Art video.com has a there’s a video on there on how to photograph paintings. It’s an old one, but it’s still very valid. The key to photographing things, I photograph my own and and solely because I just don’t want to have to deal with having to take him out. But sometimes I’m getting to the point where I’m so busy, I probably will just have somebody come and pick them up and do them and do them in batches. The the pros, the people who do things like Princeton, g plays and things like that they do it one of two ways. They’ll use photographs, or they’ll use flatbed scanners and some of these companies have, there’s a company here in Austin that has a flatbed scanner, that’s about a you know, it’ll do a 60-60 inch painting. And they lay him down that way you’re not getting any kind of glare anything like that. And of course you have to be dry. And the key to paintings, you know there’s photographing of paintings is different. A lot of people will photograph them before they varnish them because varnish it adds glare. If you’re photographing a painting properly, you’re using two lights from the sides and they both have polarizing filters on them. And then you have a camera on a tripod that has a polarizing filter. And then you take what’s called bracketed shots, which means you’re you’re trying lots of different lighting, you want to have the aperture closed down as much as possible because that makes things sharper, and you’ve got to make sure that you’re using you know, if you even touch the camera and you’re not using a shutter release, then what’s happening is that you’re actually creating movement, the camera and you get a little light movement in there and it’ll show up. So there’s a lot of things that you can do you what I would consider doing is going to a pro. If that doesn’t work higher pro given A couple 100 bucks for a couple hours of their time and say, teach me how to do this teach me how to set it up and, and do it properly or you can, for probably a few few bucks, you can get a video on that. But I think you know galleries need excellent photos. And someday when you become famous, you’re going to wish you had photos of everything and be able to put them in a book, I have hundreds of photos of paintings that I’ve done over the years. And some of them were done with crummy cameras and iPhones and iPhones are pretty good cameras these days, especially the new iPhone 12, which has a bigger sensor, but that sensor is still small compared to my professional, I use Sony cameras. And, they have a one inch sensor where the iPhone is probably like an eighth of an inch or something. And so you know, you get a lot more quality in that. So I think professional photography is really important. So check that out. And yes, I think it’s important. How do you find it? You know, how do you find anything anymore? You Google it? Right? Okay, well, I think that probably answers those questions.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2021-04-29T07:20:44-04:00April 26th, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 64

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains how considering your goals will help you plan a successful art unveiling; and how to break into a new market, such as interior design, to sell your paintings.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 64 >

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:
Here’s a question from Melissa Umbach. You got to get that hard German sound I don’t know if that’s a German name or not into Watson, British Columbia, who says I’m currently working on painting the largest commission, kind of largest in terms of size and income that I’ve ever done. You’ve mentioned that it’s a smart thing to make an unveiling into a marketing or promotional event. What’s your suggestion for doing this virtually right now? Well, I’m glad you asked. I think I talked about that in the book a little bit. Everything you’re considering always starts with your goals. What do you want to accomplish? What if you had to pick one goal? What would that one goal? Well, I would think in a case like this, the one goal would be getting more commissions. If you’ve got someone who is paid you a lot of money to do a commission. And it’s good piece, chances are it’s a showcase piece. And their friends are going to learn about it. And you want to get those friends to do Commission’s with you book up all your commissions, right. And so I think that’s the one goal. But there’s lots of other things like, it’s a good branding opportunity. As an artist, it’s an excuse to get in front of others and to make people aware of you for the first time, a chance to collect email addresses and develop those people into clients later, it’s a chance for the buyer to look good in front of their friends. And of course, they then do invitations to their friends, which brings them into your virtual event, you want to use your virtual event as an opportunity to collect email addresses if you possibly can. And that might be through the invitation just put in your email address. And then you know the invitations coming to you but your clients going to have to have something to do with that, I would suggest picking a prominent venue, it might cost you a couple 100 bucks, probably not more. I mean, these places are empty anyway. So find a very prominent local venue a movie theater hotel, a beautiful mansion, private home, maybe the home of the person who is obviously doing it, they might want to have a private cocktail party or something. Although with COVID, that’s probably tough. But the idea is that you want to have two or three prominent people there. And you want to have your painting with a velvet and a gold cord over it so that when you pull that gold cord down, it pulls development down, you want to use red velvet, it really is very effective. And the gold cord really makes it look elegant. And you would I would suggest like if it’s a prominent person, they probably know some prominent people. And so maybe they know the governor or the mayor or you know, movie star or somebody like that, and ask them to invite that known VIP for the unveiling. And that way it just makes it more exciting. And of course it’s going to make people watch because if you can say, hey, the governor is going to be there. It makes it important, right? And so you create a ceremony of sorts, where the owner kind of talks about why they commissioned the work and why it was important. to them and then you do you have the governor do the unveiling and then they asked the you the artists to come up and talk a little bit about it in the process and what you went through and of course you have the ability to subtly sell others by making some statements and comments like you know when people call me for Commission’s These are the questions that they usually have. And he had the same questions and here’s how I answered them right now they know that you you do Commission’s didn’t just magically happen then follow up your event with a thank you add an email and an image of the painting and also a replay because not everybody got to attend. Also take that replay, put it out on social media so that other people get a chance to see it, tag people in it. And that will really work well. And of course you put it on your website and find ways to get your website information in their hands. You don’t need to do a pitch. You don’t need to ask them to buy anything. You’re credible just because of the event. So though that’s a very great question and a very effective thing you can do.

Now here’s a question from Andrew Clemens in New Albany, Ohio, who asks, How can I break into the interior design market and sell my paintings to designers? Andrew, it’s a really good time to be asking that question because in spite of COVID people are spending more time at home. And as a result wanting to remodel their homes, they’re spending money now they’re repainting, they’re putting new decor in, they’re buying new couches, they’re buying new paintings, but a lot of paintings moving off the shelf. They’re the lots of building and remodeling. And designers are called into high end homes typically. And high end homes are dealt in on by people with money. And that’s of course, I always say stand in the river where the money is flowing. Right? So I’d start out by finding out who are the top five designers in town and you could call some of the local magazines and, and media people and, just kind of ask around, you’ll find out the names that come up all the time, I would call them and say I’d be perfectly up front and offer to pay them they may or may not want you to but say Listen, my name is Eric Rhoads. And I, I’m an artist, and I would like to get some advice from you could I buy an hour of your time? And just let me know what your hourly rate is. And I’ll pay you that hourly rate. Now, some people will say no, no, no need for that, I’d be happy to give you advice. Some people might say, send me 100 bucks or something, it’ll be worth it. Tell them when you get the meeting. First off, try to do it in person or was zoom but try to do it in person with mask of course, tell them that you’re really looking how to, you want to know how to get to designers, how to get them to recommend your work to buy your work, how does it work, ask lots of questions, get them to be honest with you and and even about your work, and say, Listen, you can tell me if it’s not ready. Or if it’s not the quality that you’re looking for, find out how you can help them make money, they’re there to make money. So there’s two ways of working with designers, Mark designers either Mark things up and pass that along. So like if you buy a couch for the client and you you pay $10,000 for that couch, you might be able to buy it, you’re buying it wholesale, and you might be able to sell it to them for $20,000. And you make the money on it. Some designers are on a retainer and they just pass along the the discounts and, and they don’t need to be paid on it. But you need to find that out. And you can even ask for an opportunity to, how could I become the favorite artist, one way to become a favorite artist is to pay higher commission rates. And that’s okay, there’s nothing wrong with that, you know, just raise your prices so that you can, pay a higher commission rate and still get the same amount of money. But the idea is getting them involved and telling you exactly what to do offer to do a showcase of your work in one of their showcase homes, and invite clients and potential clients for a cocktail party. Now you can’t do that right now during COVID. But maybe later, but also make sure they know they’re going to make a hefty commission and that it’s a benefit for them in some way or another. Also tell them the way that you approach things that you want to find out about how they want you to approach their clients how you know if they want you doing Commission’s and things like that. And then once you have talked to three, four or five of those top people, you’ll have all the answers the answers are going to be different but do them all and do what they tell you to do and follow what they say it will work now that’s always going to the market is to get your answers is usually where the answers lie and you’ll find that things will work when you do that. Now send that designer a small painting. It could be a big one if you want as a gift. Here’s the way I would do it. You know, what they what you pick for them, they may hate. I just gave a gift to someone who helped me and I, he waived his consulting fee for me. So I grabbed a painting off the shelf that I thought he would like. And I sent it to him, I framed it up. And I sent it to him. And he was very thankful whether or not he liked it. I don’t know, he said that he liked it, and said that it reminded them of a vacation, they went to that particular place. So that was kind of cool, but he might not have liked it. But if, if I could have said to him, listen, go to my website, I go to this section of my website, and you could talk them through it say, Listen, I want you to look at there’s 10 paintings there. They’re all in the, XYZ range. And I would like you to pick one of those 10 paintings and tell me which one you want. And then I’m going to send it to you as a thank you gift. Now, why do you want to do that? Well, I think there’s a couple of reasons. The first reason is that you want them to find something that they’re actually going to like. Secondly, they may find something that they’re going to offer to a client. And now they’ve got a free painting and they can get paid for it. That’s okay, you don’t mind that. But most importantly is it’s forcing them to look at, eight or 10 paintings to choose the one they want. And you want them to be seeing your other work and on your website. That’s a great way to do that. It’s not manipulative at all, but it is a great opportunity to kind of show what you’re all about. Now, of course, if you have a portfolio, you can show them and if you can show them original paintings and in frames and so on, pull a couple into your meeting, that’s even better. Anyway, that’s all I’ve got for you today. I hope that’s been helpful for you.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email Er[email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2021-03-19T12:00:30-04:00April 19th, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 63

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads shares why it’s important to network, and how to do so; and thoughts on how to leverage your artist statement.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 63 >

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:
Here’s a question from Brett Mattingly in Pueblo Colorado who says, I keep hearing about the importance of networking through art clubs, co ops and the like. But how do I begin if there aren’t any groups around me? Well, Brett, first off, let’s ask why. Why is it important? Well, it kind of depends on what’s important to you. But the idea behind it is that if you’re not connected with other artists, you really won’t have a feel for what’s going on in the art community. Because when you have a lot of people connected, you’re now understanding what people are doing, what are they selling, what things are working for them, it’s nice to have friends that are other artists, you know, you might not have a group in your town. But you’re in Pueblo, Colorado, I know there’s a lot of artists around there. So really, the goal is to be communicating with artists and hanging out with him on a regular basis. You can make that happen by creating your own little group on Facebook, or you can create a group where people get together in person. But why not just kind of start putting artists together, create your own little club. And, you know, really, the whole goal is just to be talking to other artists and networking to find out what’s going on in their world. And if you can, that’s a good thing. You know, somebody called me for some advice the other day, they just moved to California. And they wanted to know how to get really connected fast. And I said well join the California art club. You know, there’s no better way to get connected than there because you know, all the great artists are part of it. And there’s a lot of collectors and there’s a lot of events happening and a lot of things that are going on. And so that is a really terrific way to get connected and so Or clubs and you know, and sometimes those connections lead you to introductions into galleries or making other people aware of your work. That’s the reason.

Here’s a question from Lauren Goforth and Rapid City, South Dakota. Lauren says, Can you tell me what’s the purpose of an artist statement? And how can I use it to leverage sales? Well, you know, this idea of an artist statement, I’m not sure where it came from, but I just, you know, sometimes I wonder, the purpose. You know, I think the goal here is, you know, a lot of galleries will tell an artist to make an artist statement, I think the goal is to have something to talk about the goal is to maybe set an image or to try to create something for, for people that can kind of put a little bit of they’re there for you. I mean, the idea that, you know, what are you thinking about? Why do you paint? What do you care about, you know, what, why are you doing what you’re doing that kind of a thing? You know, that? I don’t really care about that stuff, quite frankly. I mean, I think it’s nice to look for ways to get people to know you. I don’t think it has to be an artist statement. But what you can do is you want to kind of create a sense of, you know, maybe a little sense of fantasy, you know, why do people create? Why do people like artists? Well, they live vicariously through artists, because we live lives that are different than what other people do. So I think it’s nice to have a line or two on your website, maybe at the top of your websites. As you know, Eric Rhoads is a, you know, traditional impressionist painter, who does this or does that. And you know, he’s really driven by landscapes and loves to also do portraits. I mean, that’s kind of a thing. It’s just really something to give people something to kind of hang their hat on. And to understand a little bit about you, because people are confused about art. How do you do it? How do you use it to leverage sales? I don’t know. Honestly, I don’t know. I mean, I, I’m sure somebody would be able to answer that question. I can’t answer it that, you know, the reality is to leverage sales, you have to have continual contact with people lots of repetition, you need to get in front of them, they need to be seeing what you’re doing. And what’s more important about getting people to, to buy art is getting them involved with you, let them get to know you, people are more comfortable buying from people that they know, help find ways to let them get to know you, I suppose the artist statement could do that. But you know, get them to sign up for your newsletter, and then make your newsletter. really informative, something they’re willing to open, you know, that’s not just all about you, but it’s about things that you’re going to help them learn. And I think just the idea of, you know, you’ve got to be putting yourself in front of people on a regular basis, probably more than you’re comfortable with. And that’s what’s going to help leverage sales because you never know when somebody is in the market for something, looking for a birthday gift or a special special gift. And so, just staying in front of people all the time, that’s what it’s really all about, we have a product that we created. I don’t think we’re going to sell it much longer. Because we’re kind of ready to invent the next thing but it’s called Art marketing in a box. The whole purpose is to kind of make you a star in your local market and make people familiar with you and and really just kind of stay in front of people and it works really, really well. I’ve had artists say they’ve doubled their sales in the first year from it just because other you know, their stay in front of people. You don’t need that. I mean, you just got to look for lots of creative ways to get in front of people.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2021-03-18T12:42:13-04:00April 12th, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 62

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads shares tips for finding (and creating) commission work, and hear feedback on if social media should be your sole avenue for promoting your art.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 62 >

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WuL8FGq5XYQ&feature=youtu.be

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:
Here’s a question from Rachel Harris who attended the recent Realism Live online conference and her question is about commissions. She asked what’s the best way to find a market for commission work? By commissions she means doing paintings that people commissioned you to do. Right? That’s what I think she means anyway, start with this idea. First off, people don’t know the word commissions. It is not a term used by regular everyday people. If they think Commission’s they think like they’re getting a sales commission on something. So don’t confuse them. They don’t know the term, the best way to present it is to look at people who are lookers, let’s say you’re in a gallery environment, or they come to your studio, they’re looking around, you can drop a hint very subtly, say, by the way, if you don’t find something you like, we also can do some custom paintings of your favorite subjects or your favorite people. You know, sometimes people ask me to paint a deceased aunt or uncle or, or a brother or a family member or their kids, or their favorite vacation home. What you want to do is load their lips, you could say things like, Hey, have you ever been on a trip and you found like this place that totally inspired you, if you can get me a photograph of that I’ll create a beautiful big painting, any size you want, for you for your home of that particular subject, put the ideas in their head because they don’t think of it themselves. And then put it everywhere. Put it on your newsletter, your website in your ads, you know, ask me about creating custom paintings of your favorite subjects. Don’t use the word Commission’s also, it’s a good idea for your website, do a story on it, like, tug at their heartstrings a little bit, you know, like, Jane’s husband died, they were the happy couple. They lived together for 40 years. And, Jane remembers when they first met. And you know, Bob was 30. And she just loved him so much. And she found a photo of when he was 30. So she asked me to do a painting of it. So I did this painting of him when he was 30. And she just cherishes. It’s one of her favorite things. And so, you could talk about how that works. And then do a little story for your website or for your newsletter. And that’s a good thing. And remember, insider terms are things people don’t understand. Don’t use insider terms.

 

Now here’s a question from Mike Freelander in Scottsbluff. Nebraska. Hi, Mike. He says because social media is so big these days, it seems like I don’t need anything else. Do you agree? Well, I’m assuming Mike is saying I’m not sure ‘I need anything else for marketing’? Well, that’s a slippery slope, Mike, if you’re using it, and it’s selling as much work as you want it to sell, and it’s working for you. No, you don’t need anything else until it stops working. And the problem with that is there’s a thing called a single point of failure. So single point of failure, let’s say that you are flying an airplane, and it’s a single engine airplane, and that single engine goes dead. While you’re up at the 10,000 feet. What are you going to do? Well, if you have a twin engine airplane, you still have another engine to backup for you. The same is true in marketing. And this is a common problem. It’s something happens a lot. And that is that people have a single point of failure, they put all their money into a single marketing source. And suddenly, sometimes that single marketing source stops working or it dries up, or there’s regulation that changes everything a friend of mine was in the infomercial business. And the law changed in one day, he went from having a billion dollar business to having no business. And that’s because he had a single point of failure if he had other marketing things going on. So I like to think think of it as the Parthenon, I’ve talked about this in the past, think of the Parthenon, it has multiple columns. If you had the the thing on the part that what do they call that thing on the same focusing on a single column. And that got hit by a car while the rest of the building would come down? Right. And so you want to have at least three columns, because it’ll make it more stable, but it’s better to have five or six columns, you want to spread your money around a little bit and it’s not necessarily right to spread it in appropriately. For instance, you can spread to many places to advertise. And then you’re not getting enough traction from what you’re doing. And that’s a whole nother topic. But you know, the reality is social media can be good. Some artists are telling me they’re selling some work from it. I don’t hear very often that artists are selling all their work on it. You know, you want to have a gallery or you want to have a direct marketing line. You want to have your your social media, you might want to have some advertising, you might want to have a lot of other things. You know, social media is great for getting leads, but it’s not great for getting buyers. Now there are again exceptions to that rule. And so what you want to do is say okay, how do I generate leads, how do I create something that I get a lead from spending that money. And then those were those leads can be warmed up and turned into a customer over time, what I find with most of my artists, friends, and most of the artists I deal with, and some that I’ve consulted with that most of them have their social media following or other artists. And they really don’t have a lot of known collectors known art buyers on there. As a result, when they post something or when they advertise, it’s not necessarily reaching the right people. So it’s very tricky. And so most people misuse social media and social media is a beautiful thing. Don’t get me wrong, I love it. It’s very effective. And it’s a good way to stay in touch with people and to put your work out there. It’s also a good way to be misunderstood because if you’re putting out you know, a lot of people put out unfinished paintings people don’t read, they think it’s finished, and they go, why would he post that it’s not very good. So, like all things though, my marketing philosophy is stand in the river where the money is flowing. And wherever the money is flowing, you need to be there. And for me, the money is flowing where there are massive amounts of known buyers of art people who are collectors of art who are who are archives of collectors. That’s why things like you know, my audiences that fine art kind of Sir plein air. Those are the river where the money’s flowing. Those people buy paintings, they buy lots of paintings, we sell tons of paintings through through ads from various collectors if people have effective ads. And yes, you can employ social media, I use social media. I spent a lot of money on social media, but I use it very specifically. I very rarely ever get buyers from social media, I get leads and then I have to figure out how do I turn them into buyers. That’s a whole nother complicated subject. It’s, it’s something we can address on another day. But the bottom line is anything that’s working for you keep putting money after it and just know that everything dries up at some point. Sometimes it’s your own fault because you’re doing bad advertising or bad marketing. But you can change that. And so you want to constantly be monitoring what’s happening.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2021-03-17T12:32:02-04:00April 5th, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 61

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads addresses if you should give discounts on your paintings; and overcoming the fear of rejection when approaching a gallery.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 61 >

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

In the marketing minute I answer your art marketing questions and you can email yours to [email protected] which also is a resource. Lots of blog posts there on marketing. Here’s a question from Omar Schmidt in Carlsbad, New Mexico who says, should we do discounts on our artwork, even with discounts? I’m not selling, but I advertised several of my oldest beginner paintings for free and they were claimed within an hour. Yeah. Oh, Mark, don’t do that baby. Look, advertising paintings for free is a great way to never sell another painting because you’re establishing that there’s no value to them. If you want to give paintings away for free, that’s fine. Do it privately. Do it quietly but don’t do it publicly. And certainly don’t advertise it. Because that’s going to make it harder for you in the future to sell anything. Now. People will take us dental floss for free if you give it to him. So paintings, same thing. But you’ve got to find people who value paintings you got to go to the right places. Look, I don’t know how you’re trying to sell. I can’t comment on your discounting. But discounts are not the reason people typically buy. Now there are people who if they’re in the market for something, they find it for a discount, they’ll buy it. But most people won’t even spend money on something they don’t want. If it’s discounted, paintings, or emotional, somebody falls in love, and they’ll pay what they think is a fair price in their mind. The key is understanding that and matching it, clearly discounts can work, but they can also wound you. There’s a time and a place like Nordstroms does one sale a year, I typically do a Black Friday sale, which is coming up. But I don’t normally do discounting. I’ve been doing it during COVID. Because everybody needs a break right now. And quite frankly, we need the money too. So we figured that was a win win, and the artists need the money. So we’re helping them but people who always see you discounting your prices always going to be a discount price, you might not get them back to pay the full price. So some restore retail stores do that right? Every time you walk into certain stores, it’s always 40% off and you just know that they’re marking it up so they can mark it down. But again, that kind of depends on what you’re selling in the art world that doesn’t tend to happen much a starting point Omar is to find out if your works any good. Is there somebody out there who can give you critiques of your work? be objective and not don’t look for all the good stuff? Look for only the bad stuff? You don’t want to hear all the all the compliments? You want to hear what’s wrong with it. And is it marketable? And can you improve it so you can find out if you’re ready? discounts are usually signs of desperation. All right, giving things away is fine. But don’t be public about it. Chances are people who got them we’re not in a position to be cash buyers anyway. But they’ll take them for free. So the other thing is, do you really want paintings out there that you did early that have your name and your signature on them? Be careful about that, because they will haunt you down the road, right? Someone will show up an auction or something and then you’ll be like, ooh, I want that out of the market. I don’t I’m not proud of that. Right. So you got to find a market gotta find a place to sell your work and be seen by buyers who appreciate fine art. I can help you with that by reading my book. I think that’s a good place to start.

There’s a question from Lee Branton, Evansville Indiana. Lee, I’m from Indiana. Lee says can you speak to overcoming the fear of rejection when exposing your artwork to the public or a gallery? Oh, Lee, I’m all over that. Because I am like Mr. rejection. I was talking to a psycho therapist today. And she told me that the number one problem is lacking self esteem. self esteem, of course, can be situational. There are some people I’m totally confident around, I could stand in front of 1000 of them and dance on stage and not have any problem. There are others. I’m like, shy and reserved around I know, that’s hard to believe. But, depends on certain levels of respect or where they came from, some of my early mentors and people that I looked up to, I’m still a little intimidated by some of those. So, and there’s just certain people so keep in mind, it’s situational. When I first put my work in a gallery, I was uncomfortable. And I was making lots of excuses. And I was insecure. It felt very on like me, a rejection is really fear. But why do you fear? Why don’t you embrace rejection? Can you flip it around and say I actually want rejection? Why would you do that? Well, first, you know that every painting has a special person for it, right? It’s not going to appeal to everyone, just like not every painting appeals to you. paintings or emotional reminders, memories, childhood places, things like that, they’re not going to appeal to everybody. And so let’s say that you know this and you know that you’re going to appeal only to one out of 20 people all as soon as you get those 2019 people to reject you, maybe you’ll get to the 20th and you get to a sale sooner. So the faster you can get the rejection. That way you’ll embrace it, you’ll say, Okay, I got a rejection. Good. check that off next. That way, you’re closer to a sales. That makes sense. Alright, a friend of mine is a sales trainer. She stops her pockets with hundred dollar bills. And she says to a person, okay, ask me for the order. And every time she says no, she says, Take one of those hundred dollar bills. And then, they asked for the order 20 times, she finally says yes. And they get to keep all the hundred dollar bills they plucked off of her. I think the idea is, to make the example that you got to ask a lot, you got to be willing to ask and effort in order. And so some of that is is training that you could stand to have, when you’re dealing with artwork, we’re always or at least often insecure about our artwork. It’s normal. But why? Well, maybe we don’t think we’re good enough. And if that’s the case, if we’re insecure about our work, then maybe we need to have it evaluated to look at it and say, Is it good enough? Should we be out there yet? can we improve and always look for ways you can grow and improve? That’s why videos and workshops and seminars and conventions and things like that are really, really helpful. Don’t think of this as rejecting you. They’re not rejecting you. They’re just not clicking with that particular painting. It’s nothing personal. So as soon as you understand that, and That the faster you’re going to get beyond that fear, people are generally kind they want you to succeed. Look for the bright side and everything and don’t look at them as being critical of you or your painting. It just has an appeal to them embrace failure, as lessons that bring you closer to the success that you want. I think I could write a whole book about that topic. Well, that’s the marketing minute.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2021-02-25T09:17:47-05:00March 29th, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 60

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads shares how to get your work known on a larger scale, and ideas for increasing the the price of your paintings.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 60 >

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6h7HjNtZL7E&feature=youtu.be

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

In the marketing minute I answer your art marketing questions you can email yours to [email protected] and I read these sight unseen never seen them I answer them without a script because I just got to do it off the off the top of my head because that’s how I roll question from Christina Hillen in Buffalo, New York who says please keep the marketing minutes coming. They’re very inspiring. Thank you, Christina, what’s your question? My question is, I have no idea how to get my work known on a larger scale. Where do I begin? Well, I don’t know if you mean larger scale, meaning larger paintings. But assume you mean, how do you get your work known on a larger scale, I recommend that every artists have two strategies, and sometimes three, but let’s start with two. I think as an artist, you start out local. And you really get well known locally, we have a product that we created called art market in a box. It’s really designed to get people to become kind of the known artists locally in their community, and really be the person that everybody relies on for charity auctions and getting your name out there. And anytime there’s an artist mentioned in the media, it’s you and anytime that anything’s going on, it’s like – we want you to become a local star. That’s very important, because you can sell a lot locally. And there’s a lot of things you can do locally, you can’t do nationally. But the downside is that sometimes local doesn’t work. Let’s say you live in a community where the where, your community just isn’t, the jobs aren’t there, people aren’t making any money. And so, if you are relying entirely on one marketplace, then it’s a problem for you. That’s why we recommend also a national strategy, which means getting into some art galleries, or selling nationally in other places. Now, what I try to do is I try to put myself or I try to recommend that you go into galleries where things are really crushing it where people are making money and people are doing it, like a place like Silicon Valley, for instance. Because or, sometimes it’s a different place. Some markets get hot, for whatever reason, try to be in those markets, or maybe places that people go on vacation when they’re allowed to go on vacation. But let’s say you had a gallery in Hawaii, and everybody was going to Hawaii and now nobody’s going to Hawaii, well, you’re not going to make any money from that gallery. So that’s why you want to have two or three, I don’t recommend more than about that, some people will do more, but you’ve got to have enough quality that you can send to the galleries. And so having two or three galleries in two or three different locations around the globe, so that you’ve got a little economic stability can be a really good thing. And so I think the way to scale to get known on a larger basis, first off, get yourself a way to sell and that is through a gallery. Now you can sell direct as well. And there’s a whole nother dialogue about that. But the idea is to you’ve got to help your gallery, you can’t rely on them entirely, because it lets say I’m in a gallery with, I’ve been three galleries now. And I’m in a gallery with 30, 40, 50 other artists in some cases. And so, what’s gonna make me stand out, and the thing that’s gonna make me stand out is my name my brand, right? So you want people to seek you out. And the way to do that is you got to build a brand. So that’s when you start your advertising strategy. That’s when you start a social media strategy. Although I caution you that social media tends to be our friends, tends to be people who are not necessarily art buyers, not always, I mean, you can get them but you’ve got to have a specific strategy to get them. And then, you’ve got to work it and you’ve got to work at constantly, you got to just keep it out there year after year after year. As long as you’re in business, you’ve got to be working on your advertising and, your visibility, your publicity, things like that. So the way to begin is, start out by building your brand, getting known and getting used to selling things, maybe ramping it up locally, but then starting out nationally.

Now, here’s a question from Sean Stanley in Charleston, South Carolina. Hello, Sean. Sean says recently, my local art center had a blowout sale, you could ask $10 to $100 for your paintings. I took lots of smallish ones 11 by 14 being the largest. I’m a hobbyist I made about $300 people love some of some of them. It helped build my confidence a lot. What should my next step be? Well, there’s nothing like selling a painting to build your confidence, Sean , congratulations, I think that’s terrific. And, everybody has to start somewhere. And pricing is one of those difficult things, you know, I’m not a big low price person. But I also know that when you’re starting out, you’re not going to command a higher price until you get to the point where you’re a little bit stronger, and then you can start commanding. But I think just getting used to being able to sell paintings is a really good thing. And so do more of that. So what I recommend is you get yourself an art show at a local restaurant or something, you may or may not be strong enough to do that yet. But get some experience, set up a little sale, maybe set up a sale at your house for your friends, or an open studio, get used to selling get to the point where you’re selling. But all of us need to always work on getting better, because it’s getting better. That also builds our confidence. It’s nice to sell paintings. But it’s nice to sell paintings at higher prices, ultimately. And when you start getting, instead of $100 for painting, you start getting 200 and then 400 and then 1000 and 2000 and 5000 and then 10,000, then 100,000. That’s gonna make a big difference. Now, some of us never get there. But a lot of us do. I’m not. But I think that means that you want to be constantly pushing yourself to elevate your skills. One of the ways to do that is to enter competitions, because now you’re up against other people, and it does something in your brain, it clicks something off in your brain and makes you try harder and makes you step up and makes you say, can I make this painting better. So I think that’s a good next step, trying to art get some art competitions, and you get that validation if you win. Now, not everybody wins. And a lot of people enter many, many times and never win, and sometimes they do. And so that helps build confidence. But I think, starting out with a little local thing, I would do something at a local diner restaurant, something like that, and see if you can sell some more hundred dollar paintings. And once you get some more under your belt, maybe you can develop relationships with the people who bought those paintings and sell them some more and then gradually ratchet up your prices 250 to 200 and 300 and so on. And, if you’re a hobbyist and you only want to be a hobbyist that’s cool, too. There’s nothing wrong with that. So I congratulations. I applaud you on that.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2021-02-22T08:20:34-05:00March 22nd, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 59

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads shares if it’s best to stick to one style or to mix it up, and how to handle inventory and overstock issues.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 59 >

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ra3fTKjEDmE&feature=youtu.be

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

In the marketing minute I answer your art marketing questions or at least I try and sometimes I never see them before I answer them. I don’t script them. So here we go. email your questions to me [email protected] Here’s a question from Kate Emery in Farmington, Connecticut. My wife, our grandmother grew up in Farmington, Connecticut, Historical Society there has an old building and it’s, matter of fact, that’s a family farm. Anyway, Kate says Eric, my question is in regards to art shows I paint in a few different styles and different subjects landscape portrait abstract, do you think it makes more sense to stick to one style and subject or to mix it up? On the one hand, it feels like variety will give me more chances to win. But I do. I do think when it comes across it comes across as less professional somehow. Well, I’ll tell you a story, Kate. I had an artist who who did some advertising with me. And she called and she said, You know, my ads didn’t work. I said, Well, they’re working for some people, because I hear I’m hearing from them too. Let’s find out why. So I said, let’s look at your ad and we looked at her and she was advertising portraiture. And so I went to her website with her on the phone and I said, Okay, let’s look at your website. And on the front of the website was a landscape painting. And I said, Well, if you’re advertising portraiture, they modified portraiture there. She said, Well, I do lots of different kinds of painting. I said, Yes, but your advertising, you want to capture what you’re advertising for it because you’re going to drive more people from that than anything else. So I went and I said, Okay, let’s find the portraiture. And so I just kind of did what anybody else would do. And I kind of poked around, I couldn’t find it. couldn’t find it anywhere. Finally, you know, after 10 steps, I found it and I said, Look, you’ve got to bring it to light. I have had this conversation with many artists over many, many, many years. You want to get branded as something because if you brand you get branded as all things you could come branded as nothing. And, I know a lot of artists who do a lot of styles and they might use a synonym, they might use another name. And, let’s say they do abstract they use a better name for their abstract and they have a separate website for their abstract. There’s nothing wrong with lots of subject matter but you want to kind of get known for something and you want to kind of push something I think that’s the answer in terms of art shows. I don’t know if you’re talking about competitions because you said chances to win. I suppose it gives you more chances to win the reality is in in art competitions like the Plein Air Salon, the more things you enter, the more chance as to when you know gallery owners who are our judges might see one thing they like and another thing they don’t like. So you’ve got up, enter two things, you might have a chance to three things you might have a better chance for things might have a different chance. But you know, it’s it boils down to quality, and people are going to pick the best quality, I have found that most artists are not really good at all things, what are you best at, put your best foot forward? And think about that. And it’s not less professional somehow. But it will confuse the marketplace. if let’s say you want in two categories in your, you know, one was an abstract and one was a landscape and your name came up, and both of them you’re going to confuse the marketplace when they see that. So just keep that in mind. Branding is something that we all need to learn and understand. I talked a lot about it in my book. And it is something that is really worth understanding. Because if you get branded incorrectly, it’s really hard to overcome.

Here’s a question from Thomas in Dallas. Again, I’ve not read this one, it says, I have a card line for my art. And the gift store market seems to have fallen through the number say I shouldn’t make any new cards at this time. And that means I don’t have a catalog to use for marketing. I have some loyal customers who are still buying my designs. But many of the stores I sell to still have product from earlier in the year. My question then is about supply and demand for artists. Well, I’m not sure what the question is exactly, Thomas. But I think let me let me see if I can figure this out. What I think you’re saying is, you know, they have inventory, they’re not going to buy new cards because they have inventory. Well, that may or may not be true. First off, a lot of people have inventory because they had their stores closed during COVID. Right. And so, our assumption is that they’re going to have a lot leftover. But, now that people are getting out, they’re spending a lot of money, they’re buying a lot of things, holidays are coming up, I think, if they’re used to seeing you coming out with a new catalog every year and new new stuff every year, I think you need to do it and you want to put your new work out there. And their chances are, they’re gonna order some new work, you just never know what they’re facing. And you said you need a catalog to use for marketing, well use it for marketing, it may or may not be the best year, you may not want to print as many or you might want to take a take a shot, you’re gonna eventually sell them. And you said you have some loyal customers buying your design, so those people will probably buy them. I think I’d go for it, and and also ask yourself this, is there a specialty product that I could put in there that might sell especially well? Right now, for instance, could you do something that is very related to COVID times, that, that people might find fun? It’s for a gift card like pictures of people in masks or whatever, you never know I mean, look for something that will be relevant relevance tends to sell better than non relevance. I hope that helps you and gives you some direction on some art marketing.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2021-02-16T09:52:02-05:00March 15th, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 58

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads shares non-conventional ways to get your art seen, and if collectors might consider certain painting processes to be “cheating.”

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 58 >

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

In the marketing minute I answer your art marketing questions you can email yours to [email protected] com. I never see the questions before I read them now as I’m reading to you. So I’m making it up off the top of my head. So sometimes I stumble a bit but I try to give you a marketing advice from my decades of experience. This one comes from Zion Moore in Richmond, Virginia who asked what are some of the non conventional venues where artists can show our work? How can we Zig when everyone else is zagging? Well, that’s a principle that I teach is, when everybody else is doing one thing? Do you want to do what everybody else is doing? Why not do something different? Well, you can think in terms of non conventional things. Well, first off, I would ask myself this question, Who buys paintings? Who’s most likely to buy paintings? And where do those people hang out? Right. And so I was thinking about this one the other day, as a matter of fact, car dealers, if let’s say you sell really, really expensive paintings, why not do a show at the Bentley dealer, or at the Lexus dealer or the Mercedes dealer, so you bring it down a notch. But the idea is that you are focusing on going to places where people hang out, if I have my car and I have to go into the dealer, and I have to sit in the waiting room for an hour waiting for them to change the oil or the tires or something? Why not do a show in a place like that? Where else could you go? Now I would say a laundry mat, not probably a great idea. Because first off, it’s not necessarily going to be people who are going to have the money. Typically people using laundry mats don’t have the money to buy paintings, maybe they do some do some don’t. But, where are people spending time they’re spending time in doctor’s offices, especially like plastic surgeons that people who get plastic surgery tend to be people who have a little bit more money. So think in terms of where do wealthy people hang out? Country clubs, golf clubs, there are lots of different places like that. Of course, it’s all changed with COVID certainly fancy restaurants, but look for places where I my my famous saying is stand in the river where the money is flowing. And you can do that and be unconventional not just do what everyone else is doing.

All right. Here’s a question from Kelli Watson in Cleveland, Ohio. I was just in Cleveland recently. Kelly, she says I worry about what collectors would think about my process. Specifically, is it considered cheating? Or is it okay to use Photoshop when coming up with color combinations or comp composition concepts? Well, I suppose Kelly, it depends on who you ask. And if you ask me, it’s not a problem. Now, there are people who will say, well, it’s not right to use a projector, because you’re projecting the image onto a big canvas to blow it up or something. I’m not so much a purist, I think what matters is that you get a great painting. And that, when photographs were first revealed, some of the great painters were using photographs, even people like Bouguereau, who was head of the essentially head of the the Bozar School in France, he was using photographs, because models are expensive. And, so you can use photographs, a lot of people use photographs to move objects around. And the whole idea is to create a beautiful painting. And so if you’re using Photoshop, or you’re using some iPad program, or some other thing to kind of figure out your composition and your colors and your color harmony, why not is, ultimately you’re going to do the painting and the painting is going to be what people see and how you do it really doesn’t matter what you do matters, and that’s doing something really fine. So I hope this helps and I hope these give you some ideas for for marketing.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2021-02-11T11:10:45-05:00March 8th, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments
Go to Top