Each week, Eric Rhoads answers two art marketing questions from listeners like you during the Marketing Minute Podcast. Browse the marketing minutes here to learn tips on how to sell more art.

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 27

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains how to manage your time to fit in both marketing and creating art, and whether or not you should donate art for silent auctions (the answer may surprise you!).

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 27 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads 0:23
Thank you, Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions. So here’s a question from K.C. in Alaska, Washington. I hope I got that right. She says coming from a life of entrepreneurial marketing efforts, I have found that marketing becomes time consuming and it interferes with me doing my art. Is it possible to do both marketing and art? Well, how do I manage to do both timewise. Well, that’s a lot loaded question. Is it possible? Yes, there are many, many, many hundreds of probably thousands of artists who do it well. And if you look through art history, some of the painters who became known were really good at marketing. Mastering marketing is a really important thing. How do you manage a time wise? Well, we’ll talk about that. First off, you need to consider that as an artist selling your artwork, you’re really self employed, you’re running a small business. There are thousands of one person small businesses out there. For instance, if you owned, let’s say, a yard service, and you were the only person mowing, well, you’d have to find time to get customers and you’d have to find time to mow and to balance your checkbook and where the other hats about, you know, getting your fuel or whatever else happens to be part of it. It’s really no different for an artist you just need to embrace the business side of your art and set aside some time for it. The reality is most of us can’t paint for eight to 10 hours a day. Anyway, we need a diversion we need a break we need to get our mind away from the painting step away is what they say. Right? So you Use some of that time for marketing. I also think the more time you can spend on marketing, the more you’ll sell, and actually, the less you’ll have to pay. I know that sounds counterintuitive, but the best artists, the most successful artists are the ones who paint fewer paintings and get more money for them, because they’re in such high demand. So if you were to take for instance, 20% of your time, or one day a week, out of a five day week, you would crush it, you would just totally change everything about your life in terms of marketing. Now you got to get up to speed you got to learn marketing, you got to understand it a little bit more sounds like you already do. But your life could change and you’d sell a lot more paintings just by taking 20% of your time. Or maybe just take you know two or three hours every day in between painting times around lunchtime or whatever time you know pick out the times you think are best for your painting. When do you do your best painting have the clearest head for that what are the times when you’re painting is it best and you can use that for your marketing, your planning, your shipping, those kinds of things. Just like painting you need to Give yourself permission to know that marketing takes time. It’s not going to be overnight. But it’s going to be a little overwhelming in the beginning, but just pick one or two things to focus on. Don’t get too overwhelmed. I’ve got a blog on marketing. It’s at art marketing, calm, and it’s free. You can get a lot of ideas there.

Eric Rhoads 3:17
The next question comes from Henry in Washington, it doesn’t say which Washington state or city anyway, from time to time I get requests to donate my art for a silent auction. What are your thoughts on participating in silent auctions? You know, I get this question a lot, Henry. And I always give the same answer. artists don’t like them, because they think they’re not going to get paid for their painting and they think getting a tax deduction is impossible. Although tax laws recently changed, you might be able to deduct more than time and materials No, but consider it an advertising expense. Would you pay a lot of money to get in front of a lot of affluent people who could buy your paintings? Of course you would. So consider this that opportunity. Now you don’t necessary Want to do every silent auction you want to do the ones that have rich people or fluid people, you know people who can spend money, people who are going to spend money fighting over those prizes, but you don’t just give up a painting you always want to look for what can I get in return. So in my book, for instance, I talk about preeminence marketing and how to become preeminent. And to be preeminent means that you’re going to be highlighted, you’re going to have something special. So what I would do is I’d say something like this, just say when they ask you so you know, let’s let’s get on the phone, I want to talk about this. You say Listen, I’m going to give you a really expensive painting, you know, a painting worth a couple thousand dollars or maybe more, and it’s probably gonna be one of the best most sought after prices. But in exchange, I need you to do the following number one, I want you to feature my painting on all of your advertising and marketing postcards website etc. as one of the primary items in the silent auction by painting and my photo needs to be the most prominent and needs to have … my name, and maybe the name of the painting and say that it’s one of the top prizes, and it’s valued at whatever the price happens to be we agree on. Secondly, your signage at the event needs to do the same thing. Number three, I need admission to the event number four. And of course, you need admission so you can work the room number four, I need access to the list of everybody who attended, or preferably even everybody who was invited, and I need the ability to contact those people. Now, if they’re not, if you’re not going to let me do that, then I need to be able to put out a business card bowl and we’ll have a separate prize for another painting. And I’ll collect the business cards and I’ll contact them on my own subtly and tastefully, of course, and since I’m giving you this valuable prize, I also need you to recognize me on stage, just a simple introduction. We’d like our special guests, the artists who donated this top prize, your name to stand up and you know, give a round of applause kind of a thing and maybe read a small you know, paragraph about me. So that that makes it makes sense. This is going to help me because if I’m going to spend a couple hundred thousand, I made a couple hundred thousand. Well, it could be I suppose if I’m going to spend a couple thousand dollars for the painting on you and frames and everything else I need to get something in return. Now what you want to think about there’s 500 wealthy people in that room? Would it be worth a $2,000 painting? You bet it would, of course, you need an immediate plan to follow up with that list, you need a way to make sure that they get your marketing materials or get invited to your website or your studio. And you need to understand that one time of anything is at the answer. So you want to do multiple charity events. And if you do that consistently become a local superstar. We have a whole program in our marketing in the box thing where we talk about how to do this. It’s very powerful anyway, it’s gonna be uncomfortable in the beginning to ask because you’re not used to doing that. But if you want you can have somebody else do it for you to have somebody who can represent you in that case so that you don’t cave in. That’s it. possibility away. I hope it helps. And I hope this marketing minute has been valuable.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-07-24T13:55:56-04:00August 3rd, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 26

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains what to do if your art is “taboo” for most galleries and collectors, and why galleries might not give you the names of buyers.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 26 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads
Thank you Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions. Here’s one from Lisa See, and I’m not sure where Lisa is from but it says, Eric, I love listening to your podcast and your book is something I dig into every day. It’s full of great practical information. Thank you for that Lisa. As a pastel artists I strive not only to produce the best work possible, but to educate current and potential collectors about this fabulous medium but There’s always a button right? But pastels are still taboo for most galleries. My work is selling and for that I’m grateful. But I am wondering if I’m spinning my wheels and thinking that I can really make more money with this medium. I make it a goal to always talk about what pastels are when a prospective buyer enters my show booth. And I was flattered to have been the first pastel list in the collection of a recent avid collector. I really don’t want to migrate to oils because I’m so passionate about pastels, but I do want to make a living at it as well. I know it’s hard to give advice, but I would appreciate hearing your thoughts on this subject. Lisa? Well, first off, do what you love, paint what you love, follow the medium you love. If you switch to oils and you’re not into oils, then you’re making a career doing something you don’t love. You might as well get a job driving a bus and you wouldn’t love that either. Probably except I don’t want to offend bus drivers who might be doing that but you You need to be focusing on what you love. That answers the question first and foremost. Secondly, if you look at Richard McKinley, I mean, this is a guy who’s made tremendous success selling pastels through galleries. And so I would suggest maybe a phone call to Richard and say, Hey, Richard, how did you do it? And Richard probably face these issues too. But I think it’s an education issue, right? You need to educate people about pastels, whether it’s galleries, whether it’s collectors or otherwise, when you’re in your own, show your own environment, you have the opportunity to be able to educate when you have your life in the hands of somebody else who’s selling your work. And they don’t necessarily believe in pastels, well, you might have a problem there. So I always talk about mindset, right? So the mindset of the gallery has to do with pricing has to do with everything. So if the gallery that’s representing you isn’t into pastels, and they’re going to push oils first, then you need to work on educating them and helping them under And what’s happened with the pastels and how popular they are and how many galleries are selling them. And if they can’t get it, then maybe you need to find somebody who can get it because there are a lot of people out there who do it. This plenty of pastels selling very, very well and selling at great prices. And if you look historically, there’s great pastels in museums. There’s no reason to think pastel is an inferior medium medium at any stretch. I mean, look at Albert handbell. I mean he does oils and pastels like Richard does. But Albert has made a great living as a pastel s. And so I think those days of those old ideas are gone. And though there may be some people clinging to them, I think you can help them through it. I hope that helps, Lisa. All right.

Eric Rhoads
Now, the next question comes from Cindy in Sedona. She says, I want to know the names of the buyers when my gallery sells a painting, but they won’t give them to me. What should I do? Well, whatever Something like that happens. You want to put yourself in their shoes and you want to ask yourself, why are they being so obstinate? Well, there’s probably a reason. For instance, if you were to ask, they’d probably say, Well, I had somebody who I gave the names to, and then they contacted the collectors directly. And they sold them directly, and I didn’t get the commission. And I fired the artist. That’s probably what it sounds like. So they’re a little bit concerned about you stealing from them. So I think the first thing you do is deal with these things up front, when you sign on with a gallery, because you need a contract Anyway, you need an agreement that states things like you’re going to get your paintings back there on consignment, and if they go bankrupt, you have the right to pull them out of the gallery, which you’re going to need for a judge in the event somebody goes bankrupt. So you might as well put in some other things like this in it and deal with it upfront. And they may or may not do it. The other thing is if you’re not dealing with it upfront, you can have a little agreement that you can put together that just says I promise if I hear direct from people who have been in the gallery or have bought paintings from, from the gallery, I will not sell direct. Secondly, I think it’s important to show the gallery why it’s important for you. First off people buy from people they know and they like and if you can develop a relationship, let them see your newsletters, hear the stories of your adventures, see other paintings. And then you can also say in your newsletter, you know, here are the galleries that represent me, or maybe it’s just that one gallery, then you’re doing a good thing. And so you want to get newsletters and things like that in their hands because it’s going to help sell more stuff. And again, they have to feel confident you’re not going to be traded them. Third, I think you need a backup. Lots of galleries have gone out of business, and you’re never going to get the names after they go out of business. And so I think it’s a good idea to say I want the names that as long as they can trust you, it shouldn’t be a problem. But you also want the bond To feel like you care about them to help get connected to you, my gallery sends me the name and address of buyers and asked me to send them a nice note. Now they don’t send me the email phone number which is okay with me. And you can do something more than a note, you can send them a gift box of the note cards with their painting on it, and on the back can say from the collection of and put their name on it. And then you can put your name on it and the name and title of the painting and your website, which means they’re writing notes to their friends promoting you which isn’t a bad thing either. So and you could even say your website or you could say available from XYZ gallery you know, that might make the gallery happier.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-07-08T08:09:49-04:00July 27th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 25

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains what it means to “pay to play” and why you should avoid the practice; and the benefits of having an art agent and how to find one.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 25 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads
In the marketing minute I try to answer your questions you can submit them by email, [email protected] We’ve been getting a lot of them lately. Thank you for that. Here’s a question from Olivia in Jacksonville, Florida. Who asks, Can you You address pay to play? I’ve heard you mention it, but I’m not really sure exactly what it is. And is it something that could help me get my name out there more? Well, the term comes from a long, long time ago back in the 1950s. There was a practice in the music industry called payola. The record companies would pay DJs to put their songs on the radio. And of course, if they became hits, people would, you know, spend millions of dollars buying those records. So it turned out to be highly illegal and the government clamp down on it. And a lot of people went to jail, including a very famous DJ and there was also another very famous TV host who almost went to jail, but he escaped at that was Dick Clark. anyway. It’s now called pay to play and it happens in other industries. And anyway, it ended up being highly illegal. In the radio industry well pay to play you’re referring to is a little different. It’s not illegal, but some say it’s immoral or unethical. For instance, let’s say that you get a call from someone, and they say, I’m going to give you a story in my magazine, all you have to do is buy an ad. Well, that makes it a lot easier to sell ads. But and people do this all the time. The problem is, it’s not disclosed to the readers. And the readers often assume that you were selected because you deserved to be featured or selected. The problem lies in the fact that many times featured artists have the money but they don’t have the talent. So that means a lot of times, you get stories on artists who are really not deserving of a story, and that kind of deceives the reader. So eventually, the readers catch on to this, the magazine loses credibility and it just kind of backfires. now I own two art magazines, and I own a couple magazines in the radio and TV industry. We have a company wide policy, we refuse to do pay for play, though, it hurts because we do lose some ads to it. We want to be highly ethical. And so we will, you know, give press to our advertisers sometimes, but we won’t say buy an ad and get a story. That’s just not what we do. And we think it’s a deceptive practice. That’s why we don’t do it. And so we don’t want our readers to distrust us. We want our readers to trust us and we think it also can have legal implications. There was a proposed case I don’t think it ever went to court but a proposed case where a magazine had highlighted in artists who had paid them but they did not disclose that the the article had been paid for. And sometimes, you know, you’ll see an article and it says that the top advertorial well they didn’t do that. And most of them don’t do that. Well. The collector was someone who bought Based on recommendations of art magazines and he assumed that this artist was being recommended he wasn’t really somebody who collected it for the love of the art. So anyway, there was a pending case i don’t think it ever went anywhere but you know, there are people who buy based on articles thinking that something might grow in value, but the bigger issue for you as an artist is when people find out it feels a little sleazy a little slippery if people find out that you had an article, you know, let’s say you you send this article out to all your your list and your friends and your collectors and say look at me I had an article on on me in this magazine, and then they find out Well, you didn’t really get that article on your on your own you paid for it. I mean, on your merit, and it just makes you look a little bit slippery or dirty. And people always find out everything. you know our policy. See as everything you do needs to be willing to be put on the cover of The New York Times, because you want to make sure that you’re being totally upfront and ethical. So I just think that pay for play in the, and the idea of getting publicity is probably something that I would discourage. Now, I got to be totally frank with you. I don’t like it also, because, you know, we have competitors who do it. And that does take business away from time to time. But I quite frankly, I hear from collectors all the time who tell me, you know, I started to distrust this or that magazine because they do it. And quite frankly, to my knowledge, there’s only our magazines and one other that don’t do pay for play, and we refuse to do it because we don’t want to be dirty. We don’t want the artist to look dirty. We don’t want anybody to feel dirty. Your reputation as an artist is golden. You have to keep it golden. And though you know, we all desperately want publicity and we all desperately want to be noticed. There are things that you You need to be doing to make sure that you get it and deserve it. So we won’t do it in Plein Air or Fine Art connoisseur magazines. Anyway, there’s also a thing called pay for play in the gallery business. And that’s probably what you’re referring to, but it’s the same kind of thing. They’ll call you. And I hear from artists all the time, I got a call from New York, they want to do a show of my artwork in New York, and they only want several thousand dollars to do it. Well, these are galleries that are basically saying pay us and we’re going to give you wall space, we’re going to give you a show, and we will send a notice out to all of our collectors and you’ll have a New York show. I have not heard very many positive things about that. Now if there is somebody legitimate out there doing it, that’s doing it well, maybe but it kind of it kind of comes down to the same thing. Once people find out that you’re doing it that you paid for it, it feels dirty. That’s a lot different than going and renting a space. You know, you can do a pop up gallery, rent a space, promote it yourself. That’s a whole lot different. So pay for play in galleries I you know really really high quality good galleries My opinion is that they don’t ever take pay for play because they want the trust of their collectors and, and by the way you want to be in a place that’s going to get you in front of the right people, not just a bunch of people who are pretending to show up at a show to get a free drink and never going to buy your artwork. I have not heard artists tell me that in a pay for play gallery that they’ve really been successful selling artwork there. I’m sure there are examples of people who have but you know, the most important thing is learn how to generate publicity. Learn how to get stories. I talked a lot about this in my book, learn how to do these things properly. Don’t try to take shortcuts. Some areas you can take shortcuts but you don’t want to shortcut anything that makes you feel like you’re trying to game the system or trying to to be sleazy that sleazy isn’t good. So just be a little bit careful. You don’t want to do anything that hurts your credibility because people always find everything out. There are no secrets, especially in today’s world. It’s real, real sensitive, just strive to be the best you can be. Our next question comes from Samuel in Mystic, Connecticut, beautiful area. Samuel says, I know it’s common to work with galleries. But I’m curious how do I find an agent rather than a gallery to represent my art? And what is the value of an agent? What’s the benefit of one over the other? Well, finding an agent is quite frankly, the best way to do it is to ask around, I would talk to gallery owners and say which agents do you like dealing with which ones are effective which are successful, which are not? I talked to artists that have agents and do the same thing. You know, you can Google it, but you may or may not find out the quality. You always want to check out the quality by getting references. You know, I think that part of the problem Samuel is that the people who are already in galleries of the people most likely to get an agent, and they’re the ones who don’t necessarily need one. Now, I’m not saying agents are bad thing, agents are actually a good thing. And there’s tons of great agents out there. And there’s probably a few that are not so great. But the reason you want one is that they can help you make more money. Typically, an agent gets 10% of everything you sell, so they have incentive to get your prices up and to help you sell more and they’re going to get you into galleries that are going to sell the best. An agent plays a valuable role. And having one is a really good thing at the right time in your career, helping you bring success, but again, they’re really looking for people who are already successful and try to make them more successful try to get their prices up. So a good agent will find you a gallery they’ll find you buyers, they’ll give you good advice. They might get you into better galleries that you can’t get into on your own, and they will help you get those prices up typically, and help you build a collector base. And that’s good. And the advice is often fabulous in your career, they also can manage your career, and oftentimes your marketing. But if I were an agent, and I’ve had dozens of offers to pay me to be agents for people, I, I declined them because I stopped what I do. But I would only want artists I knew would sell would be easy for me to sell and artists who generate a lot of money. Let me give you an example. Let’s say you have an agent, and you’re selling your paintings for $2,000. While the gallery gets 50% of that at $1,000, you get $1,000. The agent gets 10% of what you get. So the agent gets $100 of that thousand dollars. So let’s say you sell 30 paintings a year. The agent only makes $3,000 on you, that’s 30 times that hundred dollars. commission quite frankly, it’s not worth it. But if they can get your prices to $20,000 now they’re going to make $30,000 on you. Now it’s worth it especially they have 10 artists, they’re going to make a lot of money real money. And of course good agents will get the price up. So agents clearly want people who are easier to sell. People who are well known, have big names, are desirable and easy to get into galleries. Now you have agents who will spot someone who has exceptional ability and maybe they’re newer and unknown and they will try to get you in because they really believe in you. So there are some of those but it’s riskier because their reputations on the line if they go in there and they say I’ve got this hot new artist and then you don’t sell they aren’t going to get into the gallery with the next hot artist is easily so they’re going to be really careful. And also remember all the hard work is done up front. You know an agent gets you into a gallery and you stay in that gallery for 10 years. You’re paying The agent 10% of every dollar that you make for that entire 10 years or 20 years or 30 years, and it’s worth it. But you might get to the point where you’re thinking, why am I paying them Now? What are they doing for me? Well, they did all the work up front for you. And you’ve got to respect that and think about it. But it’s really hard to write those checks at, you know, when you’ve been in a gallery for 10 years, and you’re thinking, Well, what are they doing for me now? Well, hopefully they’re doing things like getting you shows and giving you good advice. And that’s good. So that’s, that’s kind of the story on agents. Now, quite frankly, you can work extra hard and get into those galleries yourself, and work to raise your prices yourself. I talked a lot about that stuff in some of the things that I do, the books and videos and things So, but I like agents. I think if I were pursuing an art career, I am in one gallery. I don’t have time to produce enough paintings to pursue an art career. But if I were I would get the best agent I could get because I know they’re going to get my prices up and get me into some good galleries. Now, a reminder to you that I’m going to be teaching marketing three mornings in a row at the plein air convention this may in Denver, and also at the figurative art convention this October in Baltimore. So if you want to learn more about marketing, and there’s a lot of other resources available to you. Anyway, that’s the marketing minute. I hope it’s been helpful.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-07-08T07:29:37-04:00July 20th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 24

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains the best way to know your buyer / market / target audience, and how to stay motivated to focus on both painting and the business side of art.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 24 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected]ing.com (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads 53:38
In the marketing minute I try to answer your marketing questions you can do you can touch on anything. There’s no limit. Just email them to me [email protected] Here’s a question from Aaron in Chicago. By the way Chicago has an excellent plein air painters group Say hi to everybody there. Hi everybody in Chicago Aaron says, What’s the best way for me to know my buyer? You talked about it in one of your webinars, but how does that help me sell my art? And how do I get to know them? Well, Aaron, there’s a marketing foundational principle, foundational principles are big. This one says, You have to know your market. You have to know who your market is, who is your target audience, and what do they need most. And the best way to do that is to ask them. Now, selling art is a little bit different than selling shoes or selling any other product, but art tends to be a little bit subjective and have individual appeal. But yet, if you were to look at the demographics, most art is purchased by people between 40 and 60 years old and the majority between 50 and 60 years old. That tends to be where the money is, they’ve got they’ve got money at that time. You know, they’re Kids are starting to be out of college and and they will, they’re more interested in art than ever in their spending. But there are people, of course, all age groups. So 40 to 60 year old is broad, it’s a family reunion, but it still tends to be, what the buying where the buying takes place. And you also want to understand, and this is not trying to be sexist. And anyway, most art buying is heavily influenced by women, if there’s a couple, and that painting is going to hang in the house, and typically not always, that woman will maybe be the one who’s in charge of decorating, and may say, look that that paintings not hanging over my purple couch. So they do have influence. And of course, that’s not true of all kinds of couples, but it could be true and so get to know your audience. What I like to do is I like to understand who’s buying my paintings, and why they’re buying my paintings. And so if I get an opportunity, for instance, if I’m at the gallery during a show, somebody buys it, I’ll meet the buyers, I’ll try to learn a little bit about them. Where do they live? Where are they from? What kind of business are they in? What kind of jobs do they have? What kind of homes do they live into? They have vacation homes, you know, those things, give me clues. And then I also ask, you know, what is it about this painting that spoke to you? And And oftentimes, I’ll hear patterns and people say, Well, you know, I really like the colors. The one I hear a lot is it reminds me of XYZ, something nostalgic usually, you know, oftentimes, I’ll hear you know, that reminds me of where I grew up or reminds me of a place we lived when I was little. So look for those kinds of things, because those might give you clues on what to paint but also things that you can say because if you’re in a an opportunity to influence people do you can you can say, you know, does that painting remind you of anything like it, you know, place that you grew up or something like that. So, use those triggers. Also look for commonalities in the people who are buying things because it’ll tell you kind of where to reach out. I’ve noticed lately with my paintings, I’ve been getting a lot of buyers who are doctors, and those doctors all happen to live in the local community where my gallery is most of them. And so would that give me a clue as a marketing opportunity, maybe a way to, to reach doctors somehow or way to invite doctors, all the doctors in town to an opening or something just kind of use your brain. And those things those commonalities will point out things in your marketing.

The next question comes from Darla Hey, Darla! It’s kind of like saying hey, darlin, darlin Flagstaff, Arizona. Darla says, I know I have to be productive to sell my art, but sometimes I just don’t feel motivated. How can I stay focused on both painting and marketing? Well, you’re probably not going to want to hear this Starla there’s a lot of answers to it. And and I guess it really does. depends on what’s really important to you and what’s not. If it’s not about a need, you know, in other words of selling paintings is not meaning you’re going to have to pay the mortgage. It’s just extra money that you’re going to have, it probably isn’t important to you. And so I like to think in terms of goals and priorities. Let me give you an example. I set annual goals. I have three top annual goals. And then I have three tops for three top goals for each month. Some of those goals relate to the top three goals of the year, in terms of the projects that I have to do to reach those goals, and I have weekly goals and so until my top three goals are met for the week, I don’t leave the office, you know, I don’t push them off into the following week, because if I don’t get those done, I’m never going to get anything done. So every goal relates to the top goals now, if I’m not working on things that don’t reach my goals, it’s mostly coming pleat waste of time. Now there’s things you have to do. You got to take out the garbage, you know, you got to pick up the kids, you got to deal with, you know, health issues or whatever. But I try to keep most of my time focused on those goals, because it’s really easy to go, Well, I should do this project, or I’ve got this idea, those shiny objects will get in the way of your success. I know I’m the shiny object King Success Magazine even said that about me. And I’ve had to learn to overcome that because those shiny objects kind of get in the way of my success. And so if if it’s a financial thing, let’s say for instance, you know, you have to generate, I’m going to use this number because it’s easily divided. Let’s say, you know, you have to survive and you have to generate 120,000 a year, or you can’t survive and pay your mortgage and your bills. That has to be one of your goals. If your monthly goal will then be 12,000, right? Or 10,000 10,000 because you’re you got 12 months, so 10,000 and then you divide that by four weeks and you know, that’s 20 $500. And then you might even want to break that into a daily goal. And you just tell yourself, I’m not leaving here today till I figured out how to sell that. But it depends on how motivated you are daily goals keep me motivated. I know that I have to do certain things each day to survive, and that I don’t leave the office till they’re done sometimes means a long day. I also sometimes will break my week into a plan. So if I tell people, I think you ought to spend 20% of your time on marketing, so if you’re working five days a week, then you got to spend one day a week on your marketing or you got to spend so many hours a day on your marketing and pay attention to it and force yourself to do it. And sometimes that’s what it takes to be motivated. Now, there are days when I’d rather sleep in and not work, I’d rather not go to work. I’d rather play my guitar go painting or, you know, just chill, but I don’t do that very often because it always puts me further before I think routines are critical. And no matter what I stick to my routines, I get up every day at the same time. I get up, I feed my kids, I drive them to school, I go to the gym for an hour, I come home, I get ready for work. I meditate, I read the Bible, I do the things that I try to do every morning. And so gym is critical for me. Because it raises my dopamine levels it gets my health keeps my health good. But also it makes me feel like working. So if I’m in a down mood, if I can get myself to the gym, or at least to take a walk, it puts dopamine into my system makes me feel better. And that’s helpful. So look for a routine motivation is everything. Also ask yourself what happens if I don’t do this? And let’s say you don’t have to make that money, but you want something so everything can be tied to something. So let’s say you’re telling yourself Well, I don’t have to sell paintings because my wife or my husband has a job, but I’d like to get a new car and to be able to get a new car, I got to come up with $30,000 and to do $30,000 I gotta you know, I want to get one in three months. Well, okay, so now you got to do 10,000 a month, you got to get busy and you got to focus on that. So break everything down, start with a big goal, break it down into little bitty pieces. There’s also another trick that applies. And that is a trick that I use when I’m writing the old adage was if you can’t think of what you’re going to write, just sit down and start writing anything. It’s jibberish writing a note writing a letter anything and and that warms up your brain and next thing you know, you kick in and you’re able to write well, I I think that the same would be true for anything, you know, if you’re, if you’re not feeling like marketing, just force yourself to sit down and do your marketing, it will make a major difference because you’ll eventually just kind of kick in and then you’ll kind of forget you weren’t motivated. Anyway, I hope that helps. That’s been Marketing minute.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-06-29T11:33:21-04:00July 13th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 23

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains what to do if you hit a “price ceiling” when selling your art, and how to advertise your art to a targeted audience.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 23 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads 0:23
Thank you Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions. Here’s a question from Rich in Tucson, Arizona. He says I’ve been a professional artist for years but I’ve hit a price ceiling. Gallery owners have told me they need to keep my price low and have discouraged me from raising prices. How do I change this? Well, Rich, you’ve got a couple of options. One option is not to raise your prices and to increase your volume. If they can sell more volume, whether Not they can. That’s a discussion you want to have with them. But everything about prices psychological price is tricky business, lots of great books on pricing. And I’m not sure I can answer this the way you want me to. But here goes I’m going to try. First gallery people know their audiences and they know what they can get. Or at least that’s what they believe. They have put you into a price box that they think they can get for you. Now you might be able to talk to them and edge your prices up gradually by 10 to 15% a year. And I like to see artists increase their prices every year anyway. But if you’re not selling, increasing your prices isn’t going to necessarily make it better. Now, you should, though, have this discussion with a gallery. If they believe that they’re not going to get the increased price. They’re not likely to push you. They might even push you out of the gallery. So you have a couple of choices, trust them and ask them to help you gradually raise your prices. Or you have to experiment, see what happens. Maybe they’ll do that with, you know, say, hey, let’s raise the prices and see what happens. But if you’re doing that your prices have to be the same online everywhere, they’re gonna find you, like if they’re gonna look you up in another gallery, and it’s an eight by 10 painting, it better be the same price as the eight by 10. everywhere because people do that, as you know, you do it, I do it. The other thing is, you might have to change galleries. Now. I want you to respect your gallery and have a discussion with them before you do that, because they work very hard on your behalf or at least they should. But I know an artist who had this problem with three galleries. She had kind of got boxed into a price. They weren’t raising their prices. She talked to them. They didn’t want to raise her prices anymore. So she thought What do I do? Well, she had heard from some other galleries who wanted her in she contacted some other galleries who wanted her in and she said, Okay, here’s the price range I want to get and they went Oh, that’s No problem. As a matter of fact, we could get a little bit more. So they set a new price. She terminated a relationship with the old galleries and went to New galleries that believed they could get the price and in fact they did. So that’s kind of how this all works. But again, try to trust your gallery try to have a relationship and a dialogue with them. They do typically work very hard for you.

Eric Rhoads 3:20
The next question is from Crystal B. of Texas. Crystal says I need to choose the best advertising venue to really connect with those who will connect with my art. I challenges developing a target audience since I do landscapes, figures and portrait. Is there a place I can advertise where there’s an audience that appreciates all three? Well, Crystal, I’m going to tell you something you probably don’t want to hear. Brace yourself. Are you ready? Well, there are plenty of places you can advertise that have readers that love landscapes, portraits and figures. My own Fine Art connoisseur magazine is one of them for instance, but I think you have a photo problem, and you’re going to confuse your audience while you’re building your brand. Who are you as an artist? How do you want to be known? Now, don’t get all bent out of shape, paint what you love paint the styles paint the subjects that you want to pay. But if you had to pick one to be known for which one would it be, but establishing your career and building your brand over the first 10 or so years, maybe longer, you need to be known primarily for one thing. Now there are people like Richard Schmid, for instance, who can pull it off because he’s been around for 60 years. He’s known as a brilliant artist and he does still life. He does portraits, he does figures he does landscapes. He does it all. But when he built his career, I’m guessing I’ve not talked to him about this, but I’m guessing he kind of focused in one particular area became known and collectible. people found out how brilliant he was and started collecting his other work. Now, there’s also artists like David Lefell, David Lefell, is known as a portrait and figure artists primarily He also does landscapes, but it’s rare to see him. So you should consider standing for something, you know, he’s big, you want to be big, right? So ask yourself, what’s the story people will say about you. Crystal B is a, what? A landscape artist, a figure in portrait artists, I think figure and portrait kind of go hand in hand. So that’s one category. If you want to go the route of offering lots of variety, you can do that. But it may slow your progress because you don’t want to confuse your audience. Now, if you can show different kinds of work in a gallery, because the gallery is there to be able to explain it, they could say, you know, crystal is a brilliant landscape artist. She’s known as landscape artists, but little do most people know she also does these portraits and figures and we happen to have a couple of them. They’re pretty rare, but you should get one of those. But when you’re advertising, try to keep your primary focus in one particular area while you’re building your brand because that’s really critical. Now I’m sure there are people who are exceptions to that. But I think as a marketing person, that is probably the right way to go. Anyway, hope these have been helpful for you.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-06-23T16:44:59-04:00July 7th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 22

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads gives advice on quitting your “day job” to become a full-time artist, and the best way to approach established art galleries.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 22 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads 0:23
Thank you Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions. Here’s a question from Barbara H. of Suffolk, Virginia. My art is selling and I’m becoming better known in the art world. When is it time for me to quit my day job and go into art full time. Well, I did a product. I don’t mean to hype you on a product here but I did a product how to quit your job and become a successful full time artists and I go into about three hours of depth in how to do that and what the time is. should be. And basically the idea is you want to have this overlap, you want to get to the point where you’re consistently replacing close to your or maybe all of your other income as a part time artist, or at least having the confidence that you’re about to get there. Because starting out, you know, you’re gonna have to spend some money on marketing. And it’s better to spend that money on marketing. When you’ve got a job and you got some extra income. You got to build yourself up, you got to make sure that you’re working all the all the different angles. By the way, I’m going to talk at the plein air convention about a guy I met recently had lunch with just a few weeks ago, who is making $5 million as an artist, and it’s a great story, and he does everything the opposite of everything everybody else does. And I’m going to tell that story on stage in art marketing Bootcamp, because it’s so interesting and I learned so much from him and how he built his business to $5 million. This is a guy and artist and $5 million. I mean, you know, he’s rolling in it, this guy is rich. So anyway, not that it’s all about being rich, but it never hurts, right? So, you know, if your works being represented by a gallery, or you lost a gallery, maybe you can get the gallery person to give you a recommendation or a letter or something if you have to switch galleries. The other thing is you never want to have all your eggs in one basket. Because if you’re in one gallery, and they go away, guess what happens to you. Now you’re scrambling and now Now you’re going to have weeks months without any sales until you get somebody till you get them up to speed until they can market you and get their people familiar with you. So I like to have three. I think three is a nice manageable number. You can have more than that, but not too much more. Some people do four or five, but it depends on how much work you can produce and how much quality work can produce. So you want to have a couple so you have some security. And you know, if you want to get into galleries, then well the best way to do it is to get invited in that means they need to invite you That’s not you calling them because, you know, there’s a sense of begging. And by the way galleries get dozens, sometimes hundreds of calls and emails and packages, and they just kind of get sick of it. So you want them to reach out to you. And I have a lot of strategies in my book and some other places in my videos that where I talk about how to get them to reach out to you. So one of the ways to get them to reach out to you is to get referred in so find other artists who are in the gallery and talk to them and get to know them. And then maybe at some point, once you’re comfortable with that, ask them if they’d make a recommendation, and they oftentimes well.

Eric Rhoads 3:35
Next question is from Sandy, in Colorado. Hi, Sandy. All right. So one day, we got to figure out how to get these people to actually call in and do it like a talk show and then I’ll, be able to interact with them. That’d be more fun. Anyway, Sandy says I’ve been in a series of local galleries that have closed, what is the best way to approach major established galleries? I think I just answered that question in the The above. But you know, you got to get references you got to get invited in, you’ve got to ask the owner of the gallery to contact people who purchased your artwork, if a gallery goes out of business, at least you could do is see if they’ll possibly give you the list of people who bought your artwork, so you can contact them direct or give them to another gallery. And I like to have the galleries Give me the names, I have an agreement with them as I’ll never approach them or I’ll never violate the agreement with the gallery but I like to send them a thank you card. And so they’ll they’ll send me the note and say, I’ll write a note to them and and send it on and then I have the address and I’m not going to ever do anything with it until the gallery goes out of business. And I don’t anticipate my gallery going out of business knock wood. But anyway, I think that it’s a good practice. And you also want to put your website and stuff on the back of the on the panel and burn it in there with a wood burner so it doesn’t get covered up and that way people can kind of go to your thing, get your newsletter, get on your list and stuff like that. So I hope that helps. And anyway, I wish you luck. Sandy in Colorado.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-06-10T13:45:34-04:00June 29th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 21

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains if you should change your medium if it seems less popular than oil, for example; and what percentage you should be spending on advertising your art.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 21 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads 0:23
Thank you Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions. Here’s a question from Brenda, of Kingston, Ontario. She says I paint in acrylics and I’ve noticed a certain response when I tell people that for business purposes, should I change to a different medium? Well, let’s start with the fact that there are tons and tons of successful acrylic artists and galleries all over the country. And so I don’t know I’m not so sure I got I think it kind of depends on your gallery owner. But, you know, actually there are more acrylic painters than there are oil painters. And I think there’s more acrylic painters than there are watercolors but I may be wrong about that maybe flipped on that anyway, you can succeed very much in acrylic, and there’s so many amazing acrylic products out there now that you can do a lot more things with them. One of the reasons acrylics got a rap with oil painters is because you know, they dry fast. Well, there’s now all kinds of acrylics that don’t dry fast, and as a result, you can kind of mush them together like oil and they stay wet a little bit longer. So I wouldn’t worry too much about it. But you know, you might want to ask your advisors, you know, if you have a gallery, then they may have an opinion about it. But acrylic is archival, it’s going to last forever. It’s beautiful. It just depends. I think acrylic also sometimes gets a name because some people paint very garish colors and very crazy things and, you know, that’s okay too, but it it just kind of depends. But now you can do so much more with them. So I think it’s cool. And as a matter of fact, we’ll probably start adding more and more acrylic. We’ve got some acrylic painters now at the convention, but we’ll probably add more because there’s so many acrylic people out there.

Eric Rhoads 2:09
The next question is from Leslie M. I worry about spending too much on advertising, what percentage of sales? Should we be spending on advertising? Well, that’s a loaded question, Leslie. And the reason it’s loaded is because advertising is about what you need to accomplish at the moment. For instance, if you’re a new business and you’re trying to create awareness, you’re gonna have to do a lot more advertising than you would normally if you’re maintaining it, or it also depends on, the kind of business like an art school, it depends on your margins, how much money you’re making. Some businesses have a high margin, like the cosmetic business, they make about 90% on cosmetics, because there’s no cost to put that stuff together. So they spend, 30-40-50% on advertising, and you notice cosmetic companies all around while you’re trying to gain market share. That’s why they do that. If you’re, you know, you’re only making 10 or 20% on your money, then you got to be more conservative. I think, you know, roughly a lot of people kind of depends on the business 5-10-15% of what they net on their advertising, but again, depends on the time in place, what you’re trying to accomplish? There are times if I’m like launching a new business, I’ll spend a lot more on advertising, there are times that I’ll cut back because I can kind of maintain it, but I never stopped because the minute you stop, people forget about you. So anyway, just kind of judge that. I’m sorry, I can’t give you more of a very specific answer. But you’ve got to get the word out. Because if you don’t get the word out, nobody’s going to show up and then you’re going to have expenses without customers.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-06-10T08:00:19-04:00June 22nd, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 20

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains the best practices for selling art prints, and if it’s a good idea to give away your art for auction fundraisers.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 20 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads 0:02
Thank you Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions. Here’s a question from Sam in South Dakota actually has two questions. Sam says I’m considering selling my prints of my work. What are the best practices in selling my prints? Well, I think the print market is a great way to multiply yourself and get money out of something you’ve already painted. First, you want to make sure that you reserve all the rights in case the painting was sold. You want to make it legally known that you own the reproduction rights. This is a copyright discussion you have with your attorney. Secondly, the print market has a little bit of a stigma less so these days, but some galleries don’t want to carry artists who sell prints. others see the value and want to sell prints. So you’ve got to kind of work that out. If you have a gallery, you got to figure it out with them. You can have different kinds of prints. Of course, you can have a canvas print called a cheek play. You can have a print on paper, and there’s a lot of different variations you can offer framed, unframed, etc. But of course, if you don’t have a gallery, you don’t need to discuss that you sell it on your website, a lot of artists do it and a lot of them make a little bit of money. Some of them make a lot of money, and you probably want to do limited additions to make them a little bit more special signed, limited editions numbered. I think the old stigmas going away but you do want to make sure that you don’t flood the market. You want to make sure that if you do have a gallery that they’re on board, the other thing is you might license your painting sir companies who sell prints and give you a commission they do a lot of volume so your commission won’t be as high but they will sell Thousands and you’ll probably get a decent check and your work will be out there. That’s pretty cool too.

Eric Rhoads 2:04
Sam had another question. He says I’m giving away my artwork for art auction fundraisers. Is this a good idea? I think it’s a great idea, Sam. But I think you need to have strings. Now you may have a charity that you really, really love. You really want to help and you don’t want to have any strings. That’s okay. But I would do you know, six or eight charity auctions a year, maybe more in your local town because charity auctions tend to attract who affluent customers and who do you want affluent customers. So you can brand yourself very well with these things. So I’m all for helping a charity but you may want to consider what you can get in return for the investment you’re making. So I have an in depth piece about this on my blog at artmarketing.com. And I talked a lot about it in my art marketing in a box product. But here’s the essence of it. You can kind of say to them, Look, I’ll give you this $3,000 painting, but in order to do so I need something in return because typically it takes Training isn’t tax deductible for value, I can only deduct my materials that may have changed. Check that with your bookkeeper or accountant. But you say, Look, I’m willing to, to donate this painting for you. But in exchange, would you be willing to make a make the painting a featured item on your marketing for your mailers in your website using my image image of the painting my name, the name of the painting, but you mentioned my name on stage as a major donor or introduced me publicly, in front of everybody do something special? Will you share the names with me of all the people you marketed to so that I can follow up with them and maybe send them my newsletter or something, of course, I would get your approval on anything I sent. And I of course needed a ticket for to to the event and that special introduction on stage. And also, I’d like to get a list of all the people that bid on my piece. So I can of course, purchase them about other paintings on an ongoing basis. And again, I’ll be tasteful about it. But you’re first off a $3,000 gift is usually a pretty substantial gift or a painting is considered a premium. And most charity auctions don’t have a lot of premium. Sometimes they do. So look for a way to get premium recognition and maybe some signage, you know, maybe a big sign next year thing with your picture on it. So that’s the kind of thing you want to try and do. And I do this when I do charity auctions, whenever possible. Once in a while I’ll donate one to somebody I really like and don’t need all of that, but that’s just a good way to get a little more out of it. Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artist and to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-06-05T08:01:10-04:00June 15th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 19

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, learn how to get a good price for your paintings even if you live in a “bargain” town, and why it’s worth your time to set up at small art shows.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 19 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads 0:23
Thank you Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions.

Eric Rhoads 0:35
Here’s a question from an anonymous listener who says I live in a market with a Walmart mentality. How can I get a decent price on my paintings? If everyone is looking for a bargain? Well, there’s several answers to this question. Tony. First, every town has a Walmart mentality. There’s a certain percentage of every town that is looking for a bargain. We’re all looking for bargains, let’s admit it, but there are fluent towns, and there are Walmart mentalities and even affluent town. So for those who are shopping at Walmart, I have a saying, stand in the river where the money is flowing. Most towns, there are affluent neighborhoods with doctors, lawyers, business people, business owners, somebody owns all those businesses in that town. And they live in good neighborhoods, typically they have places they go like country clubs and social clubs, and maybe that doesn’t exist in your town, but it does, in most even a lot of small towns. So you need to work where the money is flowing. Go where the money is flowing, stand in the river where the money is flowing. Secondly, if the money isn’t flowing in your town, don’t waste your time. Go where the money is flowing your choices, either discounting your paintings, and if you don’t feel like you’re getting the price that they’re worth, and you need to get the money they’re worth. Then go to a place where you can get your worth that’s trying to get into a gallery In a town where you can get your price. Also, money flows to known brands, no matter who you are, if you’re not known, it’s hard to get your price. You’d be surprised how much more price you can get, even from people looking for a bargain if they know who you are, they know about you, they think about you. Fourth, I think every artist needs a dual strategy meaning a local strategy and a national strategy as a hedge against problems. So I grew up in a small town in Indiana, and there was an affluent community there. But you know, the the main manufacturer in our town all of a sudden left, and it was employing most of the people and it really put the town in difficult times for about 20 years until it got its act together. If all of your businesses in one place and something like that happens, you’re gonna have a problem. So have a local strategy and then have a national strategy as a hedge against problems. You might also consider a regional strategy right? So like maybe another town nearby or maybe Other town in your state is a really good place for you to be selling and building your brand. If it’s not in your town, it doesn’t have to be in your town, you just have to figure out how to sell paintings. So this is a good way to give you people who are buyers on a national level who collect paintings who are going to be reading magazines like plein air magazine, or Fine Art connoisseur. Or you might, you know, you might target them in other ways. Also, usually when people tell me there’s no money in their town, I tell them, it’s there, you just have to find it. You got to hang with the right people. You got to remember that you may not be hanging with the same people who are you’re going to you’re going to be your clients. You know, if you’re struggling financially, if you didn’t grow up in a fluent neighborhood. That doesn’t mean it’s not out there. There are wealthy people everywhere. Even in small farm towns. I mean, sometimes there’s a wealthy farmer, you know, you just never know who’s going to buy a painting and put it on their wall. So you just got to find out where they are. You got to spend time around them. You got to brand yourself around and we got to get exposed around them and do the best you can because there are people who love and buy art you can build a list of those people locally, regionally, nationally, etc.

Eric Rhoads 4:10
Next question is from Jeremy. Jeremy says, I’m new to the market and I’m just starting to sell my art at library shows and shows where I can’t sell something worth my time. Well, I think it depends on what you consider a waste of time is building awareness of your name, your brand, in your community, a waste of time, is having your name and places where people can see and fall in love with your artwork, a waste of time. You know, when you’re starting out as an artist, you need to do anything and everything you can to sell finished works or to expose finished works. And it’s definitely worth your time for the learning experience of mounting a show and getting used to doing that kind of thing because you’re going to do it your whole career. And you’re going to learn something by talking to people at the show if you have an opening You get a chance to talk to people, you get a chance to practice talking to people about why you painted tell your story. You know, talk about your art, find out what their needs are, learn and engage people and start conversations around your artwork. And the better you get at doing that, the better you’re going to have throughout your entire career, you’re going to be connecting your artwork with potential collectors. And just because they say you can’t sell at the library show doesn’t mean you can’t sell. You know, if somebody says, Hey, can I buy this painting? Are you gonna say no, you’re gonna say, Here’s my card, contact me and we’ll work something out. And also, it’s a great way for you to build your list, you know, put a thing in there when everybody comes to visit the show, ask them to write down their name and their email address. And happily send your, your newsletter to them. And of course, you can, you can find other ways to get names, you know, exchange business cards, and so on while you’re there, but I think everything is worthwhile. Everything’s a learning experience. And no, maybe you’re not going to Sell direct right away. But I think you want to kind of get in the habit of learning how this process goes, it’s gonna help you a lot. also build lists, build brands and get publicity. You know, could you get your, your name in the local media, local websites, local newspapers, etc. for doing this show? Can you get pictures of your stuff out there? It’s going to drive people to your website. Don’t forget about that.

Eric Rhoads 6:21
Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artist and to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email Ericartmarketing.com. And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Art marketing.com Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-05-28T13:24:07-04:00June 8th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 18

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads advises if you should ever pay to get into a gallery, and what to do if a hot lead seems to suddenly disappear.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 18 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads 0:23
Thank you Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions. So here’s a question. This is from Kim cast in Cape Elizabeth main. As an artist, Eric, should I be paying to be in a gallery? Well, this is a loaded question. We hear from a lot of galleries that charge artists to be in them. Some of them are legitimate. Some maybe not so legitimate. You got to do your homework. You want to talk to the artists look on the website. Talk to the artists they feature too. They sell work, do they market their artists? What else are they doing for you? Is it worth doing? You know, what does it end up costing you ultimately, can they be trusted? It boils down if they work or not work, you know, are they selling or not selling. Now there are some legitimate pay for play galleries that people go into that work. But keep in mind if your work is ready, you really should be able to find a gallery to represent you who will take a commission and sell your work on consignment, usually that’s 50%, sometimes less depending on the stature of the artist. The goal here remember is to sell art and for selling art, nothing beats getting into a really good gallery with experienced salespeople a client base of collectors so they can help build you up. And a gallery who’s advertising and promoting themselves and their artists You know, that’s what you want to look for. You can also look for a local artist Co Op gallery might be a good place to start. So you pay by giving your time you know by working in the gallery part of the time But you’re not putting money out of your pocket. The question I always wonder is if I’m putting money out of my pocket, if I’m paying you, you know, what’s the likelihood that I’m going to have you sell my art? So I think that’s a good question. Thank you for asking it.

Eric Rhoads 2:13
Next question comes from David Terry, of Jacksonville, Oregon. I know David. David’s a fabulous painter and a fabulous commissioned painter, and he did my portrait. So David says, I have a prospective client call about commissioning a painting of his granddaughter and had great conversations about it, but all of a sudden, nothing. I followed up with an email saying I look forward to working with him, but I’ve had no response. What’s next? Well, you know, people tend to run in hide when they don’t want to deal with something. So there’s something in this discussion that went wrong. If somebody shows interest and then disappears, chances are he or she liked your work. They liked what they’d seen on your website. And so maybe the problem Was price. And so I think what I do is I’d phone him. And I’d say this Listen, you asked me about a commission for your granddaughter, and I’ve heard nothing from you. So I’m guessing maybe my price was too high. But I’d really like to find a way to do it. That’s a win win. Could we sit down and meet in person, no obligation. Let’s see if we can work something out. I won’t be offended if the price is too high, but maybe we can come up with an idea. All right, and then try to get him to meet with you. If you invest time in somebody. chances are they’re going to give you their money, right? So ask him to bring his five favorite photos of his granddaughter, and then also anybody else you might want to have painted, bring some photos of them, then you meet with them. And you say listen, show me the pictures before you even talk prices to them, show me the pictures. And you look at the pictures and then you say okay, I want to pull out some of my paintings, and you show them paintings. In your portfolio of full body paintings, you know, head to toe you show three quarter you show portrait you show You know, just neck above and so on. And then you show different styles and you say, okay, which of these do you like? Which of the ones do you not like, which are the ones you know, are have the feel that you’d like to see hanging in your house, and so on, get him engaged, get him to start talking about it. Well, I like this, I don’t like that and start writing that stuff down. Now that he’s engaged, he’s more likely to do it. Now. After that. You can just say, Hey, listen, we’ve kind of talked about this, but the elephant in the room is probably the price. I you know, you disappeared on me, which I’m thinking is probably my price was too high. What What do you really want to pay? And just be quiet, don’t say anything and say what he wants to pay. And he’s gonna say, Well, I really didn’t want to embarrass you and I didn’t want to make you feel like your stuff wasn’t worth it. But I couldn’t possibly pay that much money to say, Oh, that’s okay. I understand that this happens all the time. What do you want to pay? And he’ll say, Well, I’d like to pay this or somewhere in this range. And you could say, well, that’s great. More than I, you know, this less than I normally would get, and but maybe we can figure out a way to get there. So, you know, you might say like, what if I did this one and did one other at the same price? You know, if I got two Commission’s I’d be willing to lower the price for that or, could we compromise and not do such a big portrait? Could we do a smaller one and we can come in at your price? Look for something like that. And chances are you’re going to get it and chances are they’re going to be happy and you’re going to be happy because you have it now. You have to make the decision. Do you want to violate your pricing and sometimes we all have to do it and sometimes, you just can’t have to make that call. So I hope that helps.

Eric Rhoads 5:40
Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me, Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artist and to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] and to learn more about marketing ideas you can visit ArtMarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-05-28T08:46:02-04:00June 1st, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments
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