Each week, Eric Rhoads answers two art marketing questions from listeners like you during the Marketing Minute Podcast. Browse the marketing minutes here to learn tips on how to sell more art.

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 35

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads shares insights on using social media for marketing (even if you avoid social media), and networking tips for freelance artists.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 35 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:
In the marketing minute I answer your art marketing questions. All you got to do is email me, [email protected] Here’s a question from a YouTube listener who said, I’m a fairly successful artist, I make a good living and I refuse to do social media. For me, it’s a giant waste of time and I’d love to hear your thoughts as to whether or not an artist should engage in any social media at all. Well, it’s not an easy answer because it can be a giant time suck and it’s hard to measure the value unless you do it exactly right, which is something very few people know how to do. Now a lot of people are posting a lot of stuff And posting progress shots and posting their paintings. But I’m not sure that a lot of people are selling a lot of paintings from it once in a while somebody gets a Hey, I want to buy that painting. But there are not very many people who are actually selling a lot of art. And there’s a reason for that. It’s because they’re not doing it properly. I think it can be done properly. I would refine your question a little bit more by asking is not doing it hurting your business, you say you have plenty of business. And if that’s the case, it’s probably not hurting it. But just keep in mind, a lot of people built a business and they have momentum, and then it dries up and it stops suddenly, because they’re not keeping their momentum up. That’s why advertising is important to things like that. But social media can be advertising and there is advertising opportunity there. But it’s a whole different game on social media works very well for things where it’s clicking buy this now, and it’s not necessarily an expensive item. So So clearly, Facebook, Instagram, etc, are mainstream and most people are on it. But does it sell art? Well? Is it gonna get you into more galleries? It might I mean, there are gallery owners who watch and they clearly are paying attention to what people are posting to find out what they, what they’re doing whether or not they’re bringing them in. It’s not automatic, of course. But again, there’s a formula. You know, today, it’s kind of like not being in the phonebook and the old days, you know, when people use phone books, if you weren’t in the phone book or the Yellow Pages, they wouldn’t remember you well. Being on the web is more like being a phone book, of course. And I think having a website is absolutely critical too. And it sends a signal if if you’re not doing it well or if you haven’t updated in 30 years, but anyway, a lot of people will randomly learn about you discover you because someone may have clicked on or commented on your Facebook and then they see that and they you know people pick up on it, but Most artists actually don’t have many collectors following them. Some do. Most of the artists have their friends, fellow artists following which is nice, a nice way to be seen nice way to be social. But it’s not necessarily moving the sales needle, although artists do buy paintings and so that can happen. But you have to know how to do it exactly. And I do hear stories about a few people selling consistently, but not very much. There is one thing to know is there’s a false belief about Facebook, and even Instagram. And that is that we think that everything we post is being seen by all of our followers. Well, on Facebook, only 2% of the people on average, will actually get to see what you post and that’s assuming they see it because they’re scrolling through, they might miss it. If you don’t have good creative, you don’t have good graphics. If you’re not saying something interesting. They might buzz right by it. I do that all the time. I’m flipping through just going fast. So just because it’s somebody’s speed doesn’t mean it’s guaranteed to be seen. So what you want to do is, of course, if you’re working on business, you want to be in a controlled environment, that’s an environment you control yourself or someone that you know. And trust controls a controlled environment, to some extent would be email, except you can’t control it completely because you might end up on a spam list or you might get no open rates, advertising, you know, things like our magazines, our newsletters, like some of the stuff we produce, obviously controlled environment, it’s, it’s gonna get out to the right people. But you have to, no matter what you’re doing, if you’re using it for marketing, there’s three legs on the marketing stool, and I talked about this in my books in my videos, and that is that you’ve got to have great attention getting content or copy. copywriting is very important headlines are very important. And that’s true on social media too. You’ve got to get people’s attention, you got to have a great graphic. Next, you got to have a great audience. And that is An audience who is the audience that you really need to reach. And then of course, you’ve got to have repetition, any message. In order for people to take action on it usually has to be repeated and seen by that individual eight or 10 times, and sometimes over longer periods of time depending on how much time has passed because we lose memory of certain things when we sleep. And so in a short period of time, you want to be seen 789 10 times in a longer period, it might be 30 4050 times depending on if you’re building a brand or you’re trying to sell something in particular, great content, great copy, great audience and repetition without those things, most marketing will fail. The next question comes from Jan Coby. It does not say where Jan is but she says, I used to paint as a greeting card artists for five years for the leading greeting card company now teach art part time and I’m developing a line of card ideas. I would love to free For other card companies, and share my new ideas, but I don’t know how to proceed. I have a list of greeting card companies and art directors all over the US. And I plan to send them five by seven postcards to my best work for consideration. What’s your best advice for me to find freelance work?

Eric Rhoads 1:04:19
Well, Jan, you must be pretty good. I think that the first thing is to take an inventory of what you already have. You have connections at the big greeting card company. And unless you left on bad terms, maybe they would become your best customer. as a freelancer. Have you thought about that if you open that door? Secondly, you’re probably in touch with a lot of other greeting card designers. And they probably worked for other companies too. And they know former designers they know art directors, maybe ask them the question. Can they make introductions? Can they tell you who they know? My guess that they’re probably not a lot of greeting card companies. I might be wrong, but I don’t think there are hundreds of certainly probably Not thousands. And my guess is that they all have designers on staff or they all use freelancers, one or the other, maybe both. So why would they buy your designs? What’s unique about your designs, you need to come up with a compelling reason to get their attention. This is called strategy. Cease mailing postcards is a tactic, what you put on those postcards and what you’re targeting and who you’re talking to and what your messaging is. That’s strategy, cards or tactics. Now, let’s say there are six to 10 companies and six to 10 art directors. Why send a card? Why not just pick up the phone and call each of them and introduce yourself? It’s only six people. So if you get a no, you can probably ask a couple questions and learn about the likelihood that you would succeed with them long term. And if it were me, I’d start my own card company. Then the key is getting distribution and being able to afford to print your cards but You’re up against some big guns. So why not create something unique and different, like an online greeting card company, make it so that they can order online cards through an app and have them auto mail to the people you want with the messages you want. There are some apps out there that do that kind of thing. I don’t know if they have designs like what you provide, but you could certainly work with apps or you could do it yourself. My rule is that self employed is always better than employed. In other words, you’re controlling your destiny more if you have your own business. So think about that. Now, being a freelancer is having your own business. So that’s a good thing. But you’re also relying on other people. If you can rely only on yourself and your great marketing and your great distribution. Think Big and you can control your own world. Now related to your question about postcards, I love postcards. They’re very effective. Now they’re expensive. They’re not as expensive as other types of mail, but you can probably count on you know, 50 or 50 cents or $1, or card, depending on how many people you’re sending to if you’re sending to 1000. You know, it’s going to cost you 1000 or $2,000 for a mailing. And postcards don’t typically work without what we call repetition. And what I do postcard campaigns, I like to hit people over and over and over again in a few weeks period of time, you know, every week every two weeks twice a week, you will grow on them, people will start paying attention, they won’t respond immediately, but eventually a high percentage of them will respond. Anyway, hope this helps. This has been the art marketing minute.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-08-27T12:05:39-04:00September 28th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 34

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads shares how to use marketing to make your art stand out from the rest, and ways to protect your art when it’s being sold through a gallery.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 34

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qk6AYd7q3mY&feature=youtu.be

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Here’s a question from Justin and Eclair Wisconsin who says how do I stand out? Other than with the quality of my art? How do I get folks excited and enticed to buy my work when there are so many others to choose from? Clearly art marketing success goes away. Beyond the art itself. I’ve sent out announcements to past collectors and their response is non existent?

Well, Justin, there’s a you know, there’s a lot to all of these things. But first off, there’s lots of lots of lots of questions in what you’re saying, I’ll drill down here first, I’m a big quality guy, quality should matter. But sometimes quality is a matter of opinion, right? We’ve all seen paintings that we never understand why they sell or why they get a recognition or why they’re, they’re famous. I won’t mention any names, but I saw a painting by a famous artist the other day, and I thought this is like third grade work, but that’s their thing anyway, so we can’t necessarily understand it. But we do want to do the best quality we know how to do and try to always elevate our quality and try to always learn and get better painting sell because they create emotional responses. Sometimes they stimulate a memory of a childhood or a thought or a place of just fond memories, creating emotional sponses about having an emotional response when you paint it, paint the emotion that you feel and that will help people connect with you. So if you love it, somebody else probably will too. And of course, in my first art marketing video, I talked about the importance of telling stories, and how to tell them stories will help sell paintings. I’ve often attach stories to the backs of my paintings. Give them to the galleries so the galleries can tell the stories, and it helps people connect. There’s four different personality types and some types can see things and will buy immediately. Others need to be nudged. They need a little reassurance or they need stories to help them connect. That’s why salespeople train salespeople are really important because salespeople know how to read customers, get them engaged, ask them questions, talk to them about things without being pushy, you want to be ethical and not pushy. And and they oftentimes will tell stories, but there is a crafting of stories that takes place part reality part fantasy, which I go into in that video, but you start with stories And people will help connect. It’s also true people have lots to choose from. But there could be 1000 paintings in a gallery you could walk in and one will stand out and you are emotionally stuck on it. Now the key then is getting that person who’s emotionally stuck on it to buy it. That’s where some sales training comes in. But quite frankly, it’s just a matter of engaging people getting them to talk about it. Don’t talk to them so much don’t give them a bunch of spiel that makes them want to walk away ask him questions, ask him whether you seem to be interested in that painting. Tell me about it. What what are you seeing in there? Is it stimulating a memory or a thought and get them talking about it that can help and then also good salespeople can direct people to buy our PR marketing success does go beyond art itself. The key to marketing is to create desire is to create exposure sometimes need people need to see things time and time and time again. They need to know you they need to know your brand. They have to feel comfortable with you. All of that ties into it. You’ve got to draw attention to your art to yourself, marketing can be about making it feel important or special or exclusive to. So, announcements oftentimes fall flat, you mentioned announcements, they fall flat, they usually don’t work because usually they’re dull and they’re boring. And they’re all about you. They’re not about the reader. But also you got to keep in mind that you got to find different ways to get these announcements in people’s heads so they can see them, you know, frequency sells things. Repetition sells things. And you want to have the ability to remind people you know, if you send something out a month in advance, and then you know, you get no response, you send it out again and again. I developed a program that I call art marketing in a box, and it’s designed for artists who want to want to become kind of like local superstars and to sell locally, and it has a lot of repetition instruments in it to give you opportunities to be in front of people on a regular basis. Hope that helps.

The next question is from an anonymous reader, understanding why here the person says I’m going through a crazy stressful situation with a gallery not sending my art back to me. They’ve represented me for 19 months without a sale, not come through on their promises and have not sent my art to me when I’ve asked them over a month ago, they have over $20,000 worth of art.

Well, to anonymous, I’d say I’m sorry. I’ve had it happen. I once had my photography in a gallery in Seattle. And the gallery disappeared. I didn’t live in town. I didn’t even know it for a long time. And I lost all my artwork. Interestingly, I was at a cocktail party somewhere, not even in Seattle, and the guy said, you know your name sounds familiar. Were you in a gallery in Seattle? I said, Yeah, a lot years ago, 20 years ago, he said all my brother on that gallery he was looking for you. He said, Give me your address. I’ll get all your artwork back and I got it all back, surprisingly. So sometimes things are misunderstandings. But anyway, to this particular question, there’s a lot to it. But first, I always recommend you have to have a gallery agreement, which states things like what happens if they go back to What happens if you want your artwork back? Who pays for shipping? Who does what? And how is it framed? My gallery has, you know, it has to have, it has to have hooks on the back, it has to be ready, you know that kind of a thing? Secondly, you say you’ve been 19 months without a sale, but do you really know that maybe they sold some and they kept the money and haven’t paid you. Oftentimes galleries will get into the situation where they don’t really know how to manage their money. And so they get some money in they pay their light bill and then they realize, Oh, I can’t pay you and they’re intending to pay you, they get some other money. And then they’ve got their advertising bill. So reputable. reputable. Experienced galleries typically don’t do that. But sometimes new galleries do and they’re well meaning they just get themselves in trouble. They don’t know how to handle their money. So you got to work with them. But you could have somebody Secret Shop to see if your work is hanging. Or you can go on the website and find out that you know, maybe, maybe you can find out if it’s sold, but most importantly is don’t be sneaky, I don’t think you have to be sneaky. there probably was not a sale, but maybe they’re just ignoring you. It’s hard to know. The best is not to sneak around just give it some more time call him a few more times, don’t be angry just mentioned that you feel like things aren’t working out and you’d like to pull out how can we arrange that Don’t be a jerk. Because if you’re a jerk, they won’t want to talk to you. And they might, you might even say, look, if you’ve sold my work and you’re just weren’t able to pay me for whatever reason, we can work something out. But let’s just get this worked out. I want to get the rest of my work out of there. And maybe they’ll talk to you, maybe they don’t. If that doesn’t work, if you’ve gone to the website, your stuffs still up there. They’re still in business. you’ve verified that. You can send a registered letter, maybe having an attorney politely ask them to respond within so many days and don’t make threats. It’s not necessary, but they’ll get the point. And then if that doesn’t work, you can you can go in and make a threat I suppose. That’s why contracts matter. You want to have something in writing You know, if you sue for your work, if you don’t have a contract, you’re not likely to get it. Especially if there’s a bankruptcy. So, got to have a contract. I think that’s the best thing. There’s no reason to be nasty or unbusinesslike you have a reputation to uphold, even if they don’t. So be nice, be civilized. Also, you could drop in and simply say, I’m here to pick up my work. I had a client who owed me $18,000 one time, they wouldn’t pay me they wouldn’t take my calls. I try it and try it and try it. So I got on an airplane, I flew to them. And I went in at eight o’clock in the morning, I said, Hey, I’m here to pick up my $18,000. They said, Well, we don’t have it. I said, Well, I’ve been calling it’s past due. You’ve been, you know, I’m not a bank. I’ve got my payroll, I can’t make and, and I need you to pay me. They said, Well, we can’t. I said, Well, I’m gonna just sit here quietly, and I’ll just wait till you bring me a check. And they said, we’re not bringing you a check. I said, Well, I’ll I’ll sit here all day if I need to. So I sat there all day, till five or six o’clock at night. They’re closing up the office. They said, Sir, you need to leave? I said, I’m sorry. I can’t. They said, well, we’re closing the office. I said, that’s fine. I’ll sleep here. And they said, No, you can’t. I said, Well, why don’t you call the police. And then you can have me removed. And so they got angry, and they went in, they cut the check. And they said, we’ll never do business with you. Again, I said, I understand that. But quite frankly, I don’t want to do business with people who do business this way and don’t pay me. So I got my money. And sometimes that’s what it takes. I’m not suggesting that but sometimes you have to be firm. But be professional where you can be nice, be civilized, you don’t want to do something you’ll later regret. Anyway, that’s the marketing minute. I hope you enjoyed it.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-08-21T15:48:15-04:00September 21st, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 33

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains how to handle it if the gallery representing you isn’t focused on selling paintings, and how we can educate “art voyeurs” to become art buyers at galleries and festivals.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 33 >>>

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

In the marketing minute I try to answer art marketing questions from you. You can email your questions to me [email protected] By the way, there’s a lot of content at artmarketing.com. A lot of ideas for you. So here, this listener said he’d like to be anonymous. I assume it’s a he but I actually I know it’s a here because, I saw his email. And he says, My art is in a new gallery, but the gallery owner is focused on creating her own art. And as far as I can tell, isn’t focusing on marketing the gallery. There are no Facebook campaigns, no ads, no email campaigns, there’s nothing going on. And all the people coming into the gallery are the owners, friends and artists, I’m not seeing a lot of activity. So the first part of my two part question is how do I advise and help this gallery owner, reach out to the local market and help educate them about buying local landscape paintings? And what main steps should she take? I don’t know if the gallery has other than landscape paintings, but the answer is going to be the same no matter what and that is, first off, you gotta you gotta learn marketing and I can help her with that. You can point her to some of my marketing stuff, but I even have a blog for galleries, but I don’t want to be now. Negative so forgive this. But if you own a business, any kind of a business, but especially in this case in art gallery, it cannot be a hobby, or it will fail unless you’re independently wealthy. On the other hand, a gallery that knows how to promote an advertising is more likely to succeed. Now, my gallery works very hard for its artists and for itself, it’s always getting local stories in the newspaper on local websites, it’s always advertising, it’s doing direct mail and social media. They’re really working it they sell a lot of art. As a matter of fact, I sent a piece in and two weeks later, it was gone. They sold it. One of the reasons I selected this gallery is because they’re aggressive. The worst thing is the gallery that does nothing and hopes people will walk in and buy something, but that’s kind of the old days It doesn’t work that way very much anymore. So yeah, there are gallery owners out there that have people walk in and but the traffic is typically not enough. So one gallery I, I know one owner, I know actually makes calls all week long to potential and previous buyers, you have to work it, gallery owners have to work hard. That’s why I say, if you’re in a gallery and you’re in a good one, they’re earning their money, don’t be so worried about paying them their commission, they’re earning it, you know, you don’t want to be the one that’s on the phone all day trying to drum up business do you. Chances are if the gallery owner is serious, she would be doing all these things now. Now maybe she needs to learn them. And maybe you can offer help and suggest that she do some things but the way I would approach it is say, hey, I’ve noticed I’m not seeing a lot of marketing and so on. Would you be willing to let me help you with that? Or would you be willing to let me give you some ideas if she or he says no, then move on. You will spend a lot of time frustrated that they’re not working for you if your paintings are in that gallery. So in that case, If you don’t believe they’re going to work it, move on, because it’s not going to do you any good paintings are going to sit on the wall and not move, you don’t want that. You want a gallery, that paintings are moving off the wall all the time or as much as possible. So this goes to the point about selecting a gallery. We artists think it’s up to them to select us. And to some extent it is because you want to be invited in. I have a whole strategy on that in one of my videos but I tell artists to develop their wish list of galleries that they want to be in and I give them very specific information on how to promote yourself ethically and appropriately to them. But in your target list, you’ve got to do your homework. Is the gallery advertising and are they doing it frequently? are they sending out invitations to shows? you should get on their list. You should get on their email list and find out are they doing a lot of shows? Do they generate publicity? Are they properly working social media and I say properly because most social media strategies are flawed and most of the things that people think they’re doing a social media strategy is not working for them. And they can’t tell. They can’t see because they assume everything they post is getting out there. The reality is only 2%. Now 2% of everything you post, let’s say you have 5000 people on your Facebook, and you post your assuming all 5000 people see it, no 2% see it. It’s not always the same 2% but usually these days, they’re repeating a lot of the same 2% so there’s strategies around that. But the social media advertising can be effective if it’s done right, but it’s just not a matter of pressing boost post. It’s not a matter of doing what everybody else is doing. There’s a whole new realm of technological developments and new ways of making social media work. We’re doing a lot of it. And we’re using some experts to help us with that. Most people don’t know about those kinds of things. But when interviewing a gallery asked them about their process, how do they sell Who does the selling? How do they present their work to buyers? What happens when somebody walks into the gallery? How do they get visitors? How much is sold online? How much selling do they do via the phone? And how often are they selling artwork? If they say, well, we’re selling one or two pieces a month, you have to ask, Well, how are they paying the rent? Well, if they’re expensive pieces there, they can pay the rent. But if they’re inexpensive pieces, they’re eventually going to be out of business and you want to hang with winners, you know, you could be friends with people and I have a lot of friends that are not necessarily successful at what they do. They’re still friends and I love them. But I’m not going to put my career in their hands. I’m going to put my career in my own hands and in the hands of people who are going to succeed and that’s what you want to do. So do your homework. Your second question says, I find that many art lovers who attend art galleries and festivals are art voyeurs who visit as a form of entertainment instead of for the purpose of purchasing art. How do we educate this fan segment and convert them to buyers? I think your term art voyeurs is interesting. You know, I used to be an art lawyer, I would go to art shows because I liked art. And once in a while I’d buy a piece. I never ever went intending to buy a piece. And I don’t think most people go intending to buy a piece. They go to see things to see what they like. And if they see something they like, they might buy it. I have been literally to hundreds of art openings. And I can tell you that a good gallery can convert what you call art voyeurs into art buyers, and a poor gallery doesn’t know how to do it. And I think it’s about the gallery and their sales process, the training they give their people and how they engage people. Clearly, you start by inviting past buyers, known buyers, people who have spent money in the past because you want them they’re spending money again, second, you target people who have money and you can Find people through various lists. You can advertise in targeted places affluent magazines. For instance, my magazine. If you’re thinking a national strategy, my magazine Fine Art connoisseur is the most affluent art collector magazine in existence. It’s got billionaires and multimillionaires and no it doesn’t have tons and tons of them. It’s got probably three 400 billionaires and 1000 multimillionaires. How many do you need to buy a painting? Really? I have one gallery tells me every time he advertises he sells an average of $80,000 worth of artwork because he’s selling pieces that are expensive. Now that doesn’t work for everybody but there are places that you can go for affluent people. And so you want a gallery that’s working every show, all their sales people are they’re working, they’re engaging customers appropriately, asking them questions, engaging them about art, and they gently nudge someone into a decision. Now, other galleries I know are not working it. They sit and they drink with their customers, they socialize, they’re having a good time. But they’re not doing any selling. They’re just hanging out with people and you need to do some selling. And that doesn’t mean you have to be inappropriate or nudge people too hard or be obnoxious. There’s very appropriate ways to do it happens all the time. And and if you go to a good gallery, and you observe how they do it, you’ll see that these people are pros and they know how to do it. So don’t do it the wrong way. Don’t be pushy or obnoxious. Everybody though, needs a little bit of a nudge. You know, sometimes they just need to be kind of help realize that they love it and they want to take it home. Chances are these art voyeurs you call are coming to the gallery that you described, and chances are, they’re probably not serious about buying, but they can get nudged into it. The gallery that you described doesn’t sound like they’re serious about selling. So they’re going to be serious about it when they can’t pay their rent But by then it’s too late, of course, because, you know, when you’re once you’re out of money, you’re out of money. And it’s hard to fix that. So you got to be proactive and get ahead of this. So it’s important for everybody, whether you’re an artist, whether you’re a gallery, whether you have a business, it’s important to understand the principles of selling and marketing. Selling in marketing can make the difference. I was in a meeting today, and we were talking about a strategy that would make certain things that we do even bigger, and it’s all always about selling and marketing. So keep that in mind. I hope this is helpful.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-09-16T12:05:16-04:00September 14th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 32

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads shares why you might want to reconsider writing exhibition proposals to get into art galleries, and how to build your own mailing list.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 32 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads
In the art marketing minute I try to answer your art marketing questions from things you send in email your questions to Eric at art marketing.com. Here’s a question from Carolyn Hancock. It doesn’t say where Carolyn is from, but she says Eric, I’d love to get your feedback on writing an exhibition proposal. I’ve created a body of work that should be exhibited as a whole For the full impact, what is the best way to introduce today’s galleries or museums or nonprofits? Thanks for all you do for supporting artists. But Carolyn, I gotta tell you, I’m not big on writing proposals. I got it. I have spent so much of my life writing proposals and having them rejected and not having them even read in some cases, that I decided I’m just not doing proposals anymore. I think it’s a big giant, waste of time. Now, there are certain environments where proposals are necessary. You know, like if you’re doing proposals for a grant or something, absolutely got to do it. It all seems very formal to me, but I like to think that we tend to hide behind email and proposals and PDFs and things like that. The reality is that if you want to get something done, it’s best to either get face to face or phone to phone. Let me explain why. Let’s imagine for a second that you’re a busy gallery or music Director, you get hundreds of emails a week. everybody’s asking you the same question. Everybody wants to be in your gallery. You know, gallery owners tell me they get 1500 2000 unsolicited artists who are reaching out every every week or every month to try to get into their gallery. Well, you don’t want to do what everybody else is doing. You want to be different. And so if you’re busy, I was with a gallery director. We were having a meeting and while we were doing meeting, he was opening up glancing in and throwing things in the garbage. And I said, What is that he said, you know, artists proposals people have sent, he said, and I get 150 emails a day. He said, I if I spent all my time doing this, I never get anything else done. So to them, it’s, you know, it’s important, but they have other things they have to do too. So if you’re busy and you have to sort through things or you have your assistant if you have one sort through things. Well, what’s left is about 2% to get their attention, if you open your own email, and your goal is to get Through it fast, you’re looking for certain keywords or clues. So you can hit Delete fast, right? I get dozens of proposals. Every month, I get proposals for articles. I don’t hit Delete in those cases, I just forward them to my editors because I don’t make those decisions they do. It’s up to them. And I get proposals for tech stuff. Sometimes I forward it, sometimes I delete it, you know, I get probably dozens of people every month say, you know, we want to do SEO for you or we want to build websites for you. I already know we have that covered. So I just hit delete, I don’t even respond. I can’t possibly respond to everybody. I’m not trying to be a jerk. But these are people who are coming unsolicited. If I know somebody, I’m always going to respond anyway. People are looking for ways to eliminate work. And so if you’re one of the many proposals coming in the door, chances are they’re not going to read it or if they read it, they’re going to read the first headline and if the headline doesn’t grab their attention, they’re gone. So I scan things that come through. So guess what never happens though. Nobody ever calls me. It’s very rare. Once in a while people will email and ask for an appointment once it all somebody will call. And sometimes I give appointments to people that way but it’s got to pique my interest, you got to get my attention, you got to get their attention. And if not, you’re not going to get an appointment. Now I’m not trying to sound difficult. It’s just that there’s a lot going on and I can’t do it all. So you gotta kind of pick and choose. So what you say in your email or your headline or your subject line has to pique interest if you are going to do a proposal. You need something in that top headline in that proposal that’s going to sound exciting and get them interested. And it shouldn’t be about you. It should be about them. In other words, what is this going to do for me this is going to draw crowds. This is going to get a lot of attention. This is going to get national publicity Look at what it’s going to do for them always shift this to what’s in it for them, or what’s in it for me, right? So don’t make things about you make things about them. If you can get a meeting, then you can sell yourself on your idea and you can overcome objections when they come up. I was at a meeting the other day and somebody brought up a couple of objections. I said, I’m glad you mentioned that, because here’s why. That’s not a problem. And then they went, Oh, yeah, okay. But you can’t do that when they’re reading a proposal. And most people are not going to give you the time and attention to call you and ask you those questions. They’re just going to move on. So tailor your presentation to people’s needs to so you want to start by asking them, what are they looking for? What are their needs, if you’re doing gallery shows what kind of shows you looking for? What do you want them to accomplish? And then when you’re doing your proposal, you can say what you mentioned that you really need something that’s going to generate a lot of publicity. Here’s why this is going to generate a lot of publicity. See, that’s how it works. selling yourself In person is the best way you don’t have to take any sales courses. You just have to be yourself and be willing to tell people what’s on your mind. But always listen first, remember, you got two ears, and one mouth, use two ears and listen, stop and listen and then adjust your course as you go. And of course, if you know someone who will introduce you in, you’ve got an 80% chance of increasing the likelihood of getting a meeting. So I hope this all helps.

The next question came up in our figurative art convention marketing sessions. It says the question is about how and why to build your list. Well, what would your life be like if you owned your own media? Let’s say you’re me. Let’s say you own Fine Art connoisseur magazine and plein air magazine and realism today and American watercolor and fine art today and Plein Air today or the Plein Air convention of the figure convention, or the video companies, streamline and Liliedahl and creative catalyst. All of those are platforms and their opportunities to promote. So if you could advertise your own in your own media for free, it’s a real benefit, right? Well, I can do that. Other people pay a lot of money to be in my media, but I can advertise my own stuff for free because it’s my company promoting my company, right? So what if you could do that? Well, building a list is like having your own media. When you have a mail list and email list and and by the way, both are a good idea. You can email them or mail them as much as you want. Of course, you want to be respectful. You don’t want to over mail, you want to be careful about that. You want to make sure they’ve opted in to receive things, but you can do anything you want. So now you can email things like new painting announcements, workshop announcements, newsletters and things Like that, whereas you could still buy advertising and you still should buy advertising. But this is a way to expand on it. So I like to say, look for everything you do to drive one particular initiative and that’s building your list. I try to do that very much. on your website, you should have something that makes them join your list on your social media talk about it, you should have business cards to talk about it. You should have it on the signature of the bottom of your email talks about it on your you know, everything that you do talk about build my list. Well, the way to do that is to create an incentive product. Let’s say you want to do the 20 best paintings you’ve ever done or 25 best paintings, you can say I’ve got an ebook of the 25 best paintings I’ve ever done in the stories behind them, takes you 10 minutes to create it. Make a nice cover, put it on your website, they click on it says you know free, just enter your email address. Now you have the ability to to email them and and talk to them. And this is the way to build customers for whatever it is you’re doing. And if you want something very specific, build an E book that’s specific to that. So if you wanted something for painters, and something different for collectors have a different subject for each and that collectors will go with the one subject, the painters will go with the other. Of course, we’re finding today, a lot of collectors are learning to paint, so you might get them to do both. Anyway, I hope that helps. But having your own media is a beautiful thing. So if you can, you could do that. That’s a great thing. And the nice thing about email is that you can control it a little bit more, right, you can mail it now, there are things called open rates. And so if you get like a 18 or 15% open rate that’s considered pretty good. Not everybody’s going to open every email. And so you know, that’s in a social media only 2% of the people on your newsfeed ever see what you’ve put out there. Only 2% so if you’ve got 10 thousand people, you’re getting to 200 people. And we all think that everybody sees everything, but it’s just not true. So this is something you can control a little bit more. Now you got to have the speaking of headlines and subject lines, you got to have powerful headlines and subject lines on your email subject, and on your headline because if those don’t draw people in, then nobody’s gonna pay attention to it, so you’ve got some homework to do. Anyway, I hope that’s been helpful. I want to remind you that I’ll be doing art marketing three mornings live at the upcoming plein air convention and also the upcoming figurative art convention. It’s kind of fun to do live because we can interact and you can ask your questions. So come and join us. Anyway, that is today’s art marketing minute.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-09-08T09:07:03-04:00September 7th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 31

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads shares advice for making prints of your artwork, and how licensing works to help you make more money from your art.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 31 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads

In the marketing minute I try to answer your art marketing questions to give me a question or two, Tell me who you are your name and your town and email me [email protected] Today, two questions come from the same person Brent in northern Utah. He says I paint really, really small, often five by seven or less with watercolor pencils. I also have painted a lot of digital paintings using art rage, which is a an app. Because of the nature of my original pieces. I believe the best way to monetize these would be to sell prints in this way. I could even be scaled up if I desire. So my main question for you is, what’s your best advice on selling prints? Well, Brent, it’s an interesting question. It’s one that comes up a lot. A lot of artists talk about selling prints. Selling your originals is an option of course. But In most cases, the smaller you paint, the smaller the price, you may or may not get a lot of money for smaller paintings, it’s hard to know I haven’t seen your work. But exceptional work will sell no matter what the question is always the price point. The nice thing about your medium of pencils and painting small as you can scale it up. Or if you’re painting and art rage an app, you can scale it up to almost any size print. The print market can be tricky. And prints are oftentimes a question for artists But usually, because they don’t want to devalue their originals by making prints some fear that it’s going to make the buyer feel like it’s less of a painting if there are more prints out there. But I quite frankly think it’s the opposite. I think if you have a couple of really good paintings, I wouldn’t do it with every one. They have a couple of really good paintings, you make prints of those. You’re ahead of the game. If you’re the buyer, because you have the original and of course others can have a print but it’s not the original and of course it can be signed and numbered if you want to do that. So I don’t think it hurts you. And of course, the question becomes where do you distribute and sell these prints, you do it online, you do it in a gallery. There are lots of online sites willing to carry your images and, and print on demand. And you want to vet out their quality before picking them, because you want to see if they’re going to get your colors right, they’re going to do nice paper and so on. And dig around till you find somebody to do that. Now, you can also work with a print distributor. Some of these companies sell to galleries or hotels, or even places like Target, they mass produce them. So they’re not necessarily printing them out as you play prints, but they’re mass producing, printing them. And then they pay you a per print fee or royalty of some kind. It’s not a lot of money, but it can add up if you get a lot of volume. And of course, if you’re at a place like Target, they may sell thousands or maybe 10s of thousands. So lots of these companies can also do licensing your work.

I see your second question. Here is the licensing the images, but you have no idea how that works. Well licensing is a big industry for those who don’t understand it. Let’s start by saying that if you have a brand name, let’s say it’s Coca Cola, coke will license their image. And you’ll see it on products. You know, if you walk into any gift shop, you might see nostalgic Coca Cola posters with Santa Claus. Or you might see the polar bear is a stuffed toy. They don’t make all those products, they licensed them. And people who make products go around and find people who have interesting names that they can logo put their their logos on their products. So a friend of mine does this with prints or not prints but with paintings. So he has a deal with a major licensing firm who sells his license of his images. And they represent him at the big annual licensing conference where people shop for brands for their products. In his case, his paintings go on calendars and mouse pads and coffee mugs and you name it t shirts. He gets a percentage of everything sold. It’s negotiated for him by the firm, and they keep a percentage for doing it for him. And he’s making a few extra thousand dollars a month, which is not so bad. Some years are good. Some years are not good depends on how things do you know, and art styles can be cyclical. But he’s been consistent for about 20 years, getting money every single month from paintings that he could have only sold one time and so this way he gets more money out of his paintings. So I think it’s a good thing but you want to find a professional licensing firm that’s going to be trustworthy. Do it all for you because trying to do this on your own is not a good use of your time these people know their market. Well, I hope this has been helpful. This has been the art marketing minute.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-08-14T15:05:52-04:00August 31st, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 30

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains how “building celebrity” can propel your art career, and how to get better results from your mailing list.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 30 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads 0:35
Here’s a question from Francis in Dallas. Eric in your book you talk a lot about building celebrity. Isn’t that a bit much I mean, artists are not really celebrities. Well Francis gets your point and I respect it. But consider this a lot of artists become celebrities Some are even national celebrities are gonna think about Norman Rockwell or and Andrew Wyeth are possible Or Salvador Dali. You know, and there are times a lot of people became very famous. I mean even Thomas Kincade became very famous, right? but many are celebrities of sorts just in the art world like there there are a lot of people in the art world who know who Richard Schmidt is, or CW Mundi, or Katherine Stats or Casey Baugh, or Jeremy Lipkin. You know, those people are stars in our world in the world of collectors. So they’re kind of celebrities, right? I think so. People love to associate with celebrities or what they consider to be the best of the best. And when you’re well known, you’re kind of considered the best of the best and that can help your career because you don’t have to explain who you are, or tell your story. It makes everything so much easier. It eliminates friction at the gallery, eliminates friction at sales. I mean, you know, in the art world and you say, Richard Smith, everybody’s going I really know who he is right? I’d love to own one of his paintings. That’s the effect that you want and galleries know it. And people, as a result will pay better prices. Typically, they’ll want to own something of yours because it makes them feel connected to you. And of course, because you’re well known, they respect that even more. And though Yeah, it shouldn’t really be that way. Because we should be known for just the quality of our paintings, but the quality of our paintings helps make us more well known and celebrity, right. So that’s kind of how it works. Anyway, maybe the word celebrities a little too strong, but you could even become a local celebrity or local recognized artist anyway in your community. And you can really build that to your advantage. I know lots and lots of artists who are really well known in their community or their region or their state. And like Rick Wilson, a friend of mine in Indiana, I mean, he he had CW Mundi, really well known around Indiana, Rick’s becoming more and more known CW has been known for a long time. And so in Indiana, they’re even more famous than, than most and yet. courses, some of them are becoming famous or have been famous in the national scene as well. So that’s pretty cool. Anyway, that stuff all helps your career paves an easier path for you to sell more paintings, and get more invitations to events over time get invited into galleries. And it’s worth considering. Now that celebrity is built through a number of ways. And that can be built through marketing, public relations, advertising, in our marketing in a box product, we have a system that kind of teaches people how to do that kind of stuff and how to you know, just get out there and get known, get in front of the right charities and get invited to those things and get highlighted at those things. So that’s anyway, a little touch on Celebrity.

Eric Rhoads 3:39
The next question is from Kimberly, in Chico, California. Kimberly says, I have a mailing list and I’m pretty good about sending things to my list. And I have been for about 10 years. But I’m not getting the kind of response and results that I used to get and I’m not really sure why do you have any ideas? Well, Kimberly first I’ve been to Chico, California. In fact, there’s an old department store, downtown Chico that is now an antique store. At least it was when I was there. And I bought a painting in there for about 20 bucks. Maybe it was even I think it was 10 bucks. It was a kind of an old frame. It’s very dark and had a big tear in it. And of course, everybody just ignored it. And I could kind of see through it and it ended up when I cleaned it up and fixed it. It turned out to be a really beautiful Hudson River school painting. I’m not sure who did it. It’s not signed, it’s probably not worth a lot of money, but it’s worth more than 20 bucks and it’s beautiful. So to get to your question, a couple of things come to mind. The first thing is messaging. Whatever you are sending, has to be wanted or has to be entertaining. And if it’s male or it’s email, it’s got to cut through the clutter, get them to pay attention and needs to be useful and interesting or helpful. So you got to shake it up once in a while. If you have The same stuff, the same format you’ve been sending all the time, you’re not going to get people paying attention. So shake it up, make a difference, change the logo, change the look, make the content different, do some different things to get attention. And that will help people pay more attention to it. I get emails from, oh, gosh, lots of artists who send me their newsletters, and some of them are really great. And I opened them every time and some of them are really boring. And I delete them without opening them. Why? Because I know which ones are great and which ones are boring. And the same people will know that about you. So don’t be boring. So Kimberly, the problem though, is probably not just being boring or maybe not getting attention. The most likely thing has to do with a management of your mail list. And this could be your direct mail list, or your email list. There’s a concept called attrition. Let’s say you have 1000 names on your mail list. And let’s say that each year 10% of those thousand names, which is 100, people will move, die, drop off your list, or maybe not be in the market anymore. Maybe it’s because they have too many paintings and they’re retiring. That could be an average year. So for every year that you have not replaced those hundred names, you’ve lost names. So for instance, over five years, you would have lost 500 people. And you gotta have at least 500 more people on the list just to make the list right. And it’s, it can’t just be people, it’s got to be people who are likely to be buyers. You don’t want non buyers you don’t want people who aren’t interested in art. Yeah, you might be able to convince a few but you want to look for the people that are the closest person to a sale, which is somebody who loves art buys art. Maybe you met him at an art show, that kind of thing. I don’t know if you ever saw my art marketing bootcamp videos, but one of them I talk about, I show this big picture of an elevator and it’s not an elevator and escalator and it’s an up and down, right? There’s one big row going down, there’s one big row going up. And the point is, is that there are always people in and out of the market and in and out of your list. Let’s say somebody inherit some money, you know, Uncle Charlie dies, and they get a few thousand bucks. And they’ve had their eye on something they love for a long time. They get that thousand bucks burn in a hole in their pocket, guess where they’re going to go? They’re going to go out there. That’s why advertising needs to be continuous, not on and off. Because you want to submit ideas about paintings or your products in the eyes of people who are maybe saving themselves. Well, maybe someday maybe they even know they inherited the money but they can’t buy it yet to lawyers send the check. Or maybe they get a better job or they get a bonus or something like that. So that’s people coming into the market. People going out of the market, they retire, they lose a job. They have Have a financial crisis, the stock market crashes and they don’t have any money anymore. And they may never return. Right? So galleries experienced this all the time and galleries know typically that you have to keep advertising because advertising brings new people into your list. And they’re if you’re advertising in the right places, they’re qualified people, right? So anyway, you always have to be mining for new names, not just names, but names of people who love art. And typically people who have the money to buy it, you know, you don’t want to it’s it’s okay to send your newsletter to somebody who doesn’t have the money, but they’re not going to buy anything. So just keep that in mind. Always be looking for new people. And people ask me, should I buy a list? Now typically, not because typically, you want to build your own list, it’s better that way. And there you know, there’s expenses associated with it. But you can be collecting cards and advertising and collecting leads. You want to make sure that everybody who comes to your website has a chance and an incentive. To sign up for your website, that’s really important. Anyway, hope that helps.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-07-31T12:19:04-04:00August 24th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 29

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains where you should advertise your art when you’re ready to start selling it, and he gives a quick overview of the complicated subject of “branding” and how it affects selling your art to the right buyers.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 29 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads 0:23
Thank you Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions.

Eric Rhoads 0:35
Here’s a question from Kevin in Nashville, Tennessee. Kevin says Eric, I’ve been working on art and finally have decided to start selling it start marketing it Where should I advertise? Well, Kevin asking me that question is probably not very objective because of course I’m going to tell you you should advertise in plein air magazine Fine Art connoisseur artists on art American watercolor plein air today and fine art today. Lots of good stuff. options. But quite frankly, even though they’re good options and very targeted to very specific artists like fine art connoisseurs very targeted collectors, plein air reaches the plein air collectors and the artists. But I have to tell you that most advertising dollars are wasted, right? Because many people don’t understand advertising. And one of the things that happens is when you’re first learning advertising, you’re going to easily get seduced by things that people tell you which may or may not be accurate, but most importantly, not necessarily effective for you. Most people spend their time and money where they are comfortable and where their friends are. Let me give you an example of that. For instance, I have this guy named Murray, whoever, I tried to get to advertise with my radio stations one time. He owned a clothing store in Salt Lake City that appealed to teenagers. And I owned a top 40 stations that appeal to teenagers and it was a perfect fit yet he wouldn’t advertise with us. He advertised the Have a local Elevator Music station. And when I asked him who his customers were, he said their teens. I said, Well, why do you advertise on the elevator music station that doesn’t have any teens listening? And he said, Well, it’s where my friends are. It’s the friends at the country club. And it gives me a lot of status at the country club. And I said, Well, is it working? Is it bringing in teensy says no, but it’s making me very popular at the country club. His goal was ego and popularity for that it was a good move, but it wasn’t necessarily about selling product. If you really want to sell product, don’t worry about where your friends are. And if your friends are seeing your ads, what you want to worry about is are you in the right fit, for instance, if you want to reach wealthy collectors, then you want to go to something like fine art connoisseur, which has ultra wealthy collectors, lots of billionaires, lots of really, really wealthy people. If you want to reach people who collect plein air paintings and people who go on the plein air circuit, then you want to go to Plein Air magazine. If you want to reach people who are artists and specifically You want to talk to them about something that is you’re selling to artists, and you want to be in plein air magazine, or artists on art, etc. So think about that. But good advertising is about good targeting, pick a place that matches what you’re trying to accomplish. And of course, if you read my books and you watch my videos, I always am talking about how you really need to figure out what you want to accomplish. develop a strategy before you start doing a tactic. advertising is a tactic, an important one no less, but you have to be ready for it. And advertising takes some time. You got to do it right. We can walk you through how to do that. Anyway, I’ve got a section on that in my book.

Eric Rhoads 3:39
Another question from Michelle in St. Petersburg, Florida. I’m not sure I understand the concept of branding, and why it’s important. Can you explain it for me? Well, Michelle, branding is a complicated subject and I’ll try to tackle it briefly. Did you know that the top line of BMW car the top line of BMW is all So the exact same car is a Bentley, same frame, same engine, same body. The style is the body style is slightly different, but everything is about the same. The only difference is the manufacturing cost. It’s $18,000 more because they put some special interior touches and they put the special Bentley grille and stuff like that on it yet, I’m told the difference in price is $150,000 more than the BMW so you could buy the BMW for $150,000 less and get about the same car yet Bentley is the top upscale brand are one of the top and you have to be very, very rich to drive a $250,000 car yet it’s still a car. Why not just buy a Kia for $20,000? Right? Well, it’s not about transportation is it? It’s about stature. It’s about status. It’s about self image of the buyer, wanting to be known for and seen with the best and it’s not just that it’s Creating a position for instance, you could buy a Trac phone for about 100 bucks. Why bother with an iPhone? That’s 1000 bucks? Well, it’s because you want the cool stuff but you want the status with it. Most of us don’t think about the status, but there’s kind of a little hidden thing in the back of our head that we want the best right? Price appeals to certain groups. high price appeals to other groups, low prices appeal to certain groups ultra high, ultra high prices appeal to certain groups. So the brand you reinforce, helps people to determine if you fit into their world. I’ve told many times about the lady who tore up a check when the man said she asked them the man How much is this painting? He said? $4,000 she wrote a check for $40,000 he said no ma’am, you misunderstood 4000 She said it must not be very good. She ripped up the check and went away. Right. So the brand you reinforce helps determine if you fit in their world. She didn’t think a $44,000 painting fit into her world but A $40,000 painting did we can’t relate to that, because we don’t necessarily have that kind of money. But that’s how things work. And so a brand creates what people’s it reflects people’s self esteem, you got to figure out where you want to be seen. You want to stand for something. And a brand is also about developing trust in the minds of your target customers. We know people, I know people in a way you probably do too. We know people who sell their paintings for a million dollars, or for a quarter of a million dollars. And we also know paintings that are the same size, and maybe pretty close to equal quality that are a whole lot less money. But it’s because of the brand of the artist because the artist is well known the artist has proven himself or herself and developed a following. And that’s what branding is all about. So when you have a good brand, it really serves you because it helps you get better prices but you have to build that brand. That doesn’t happen overnight. We have a whole section on the book on that.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-07-31T10:45:38-04:00August 17th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 28

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads shares advice on how to know when your paintings are “good enough” to sell and when to start marketing your art, and tips for building your first website so you can sell your art online.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 28 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads 0:24
Thank you Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions. Here’s a question from Janet of Queen, New Mexico. How many paintings that are good enough should I have before I start marketing my art? Well, loaded question, Janet. How do you know if it’s good enough right now, you may think it’s good enough, but somebody else may not. If you’re putting your paintings out there and they’re selling, they’re good enough for somebody. So that’s a good start. So let’s get some experience, let’s do a little show set up in a local restaurant, do some things like that to see. And anytime you do a show you want to have, you know, at least eight or 10 paintings and probably twice as many if you possibly can, I would get expert opinions. Try to get some people who know who are expert artists, gallery owners or others to give you some opinions. Are you ready? and be ready because they might not tell you you are. So you’ve just got to keep practicing, get ready if you’re not. If you want to get into a gallery, of course, you got to have a body of work and they want to see consistency across multiple paintings. You know, you don’t want to have one good painting and you certainly don’t want to take a painting that you did in a workshop with an instructor who worked on it and put that out there because that’s considered a no no. Okay? It’s it may be something you did, but if you didn’t do it entirely, or it’s not an original composition, it will get discovered. Anyway. It’s never too early to start marketing yourself. You know, and you know what i what i mean by that is you can be gathering names. You don’t necessarily have to be advertising it putting yourself out there but you can test the market to some shows and start building a list of interested people. Anytime you get anybody interested, ask for a business card or ask them to give you their email address, you’ll put them on your eventual newsletter and that way you could be building names. So that’s part of what you can do. Alright. Anyway, I think you want to have a fair number of paintings before you get rolling. Probably a dozen is a good number. You don’t want to look empty. If you’re doing a website, you want to have some red dots and sold paintings. That would be nice, too.

Eric Rhoads 2:31
Next question from Sandy in Eldorado, Arkansas, Sandy, welcome to the podcast. She says or he says I don’t know if it’s a he or she. It says I’m looking for a website. Should I go with a company that focuses on building websites for artists? should I look for a shopping cart in my artists website? Should I go with one of these sites that they advertise on TV? Well, Sandy, look, there are a lot of people out there that build websites. It’s become kind of commodity with a lot of people, but there are people out there that do websites just for artists and they offer some tools that kind of make it easier for you. Why not consider one of those? That’s what I would say, you know, it’s not always about how much money you’re going to save. It’s about you know, what’s gonna work well for you. But you have to ask yourself why you want a website. I got an email from some lady the other day and she said, You know, I, I spent some money, I got a website, I put the website up, I had it up for a year, I only had like, 30 visitors and I didn’t sell any paintings. Well, what do you expect? Really? I mean, the reality is that a website is kind of like having your name in the phone book, right? There are millions 10s of millions, probably more than 10s of millions of websites out there. How are you going to get discovered? How are they going to find out about you? What are you going to do to drive them there? So you got to ask yourself, why do you want a website you know, because maybe you could do it on a Facebook page, right? What’s your purpose, if you want to be discovered you can drive them to a lot of different places website or Facebook page or otherwise, but you Really want to ask yourself if I’m going to have a website? What’s my strategy? How am I going to drive people to my website, and that’s what you really want to be thinking about. So I don’t know, you’d probably want to start out and experiment a little bit, see what you can learn. Having a shopping cart. If you’re thinking about selling your artwork online, might be a good idea. shopping carts can be a little bit more expensive, but some of the services offer them but you know, don’t necessarily set high expectations. I know a lot of artists who are on a lot of websites and a lot of them are not selling anything on their websites, a few are, but a lot of them are not and they’re selling at other places or they’re driving people to their websites by advertising to places that have known collectors, you know, like Fine Art Connoisseur magazine or Plein Air magazine. So you might want to consider those things. You know, just get out there and try some things. There’s not necessarily always a right or wrong. There’s also platforms like Etsy and eBay, you know, might be a good way to experiment. But anyway, this may be helpful.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-07-27T09:11:37-04:00August 10th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 27

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains how to manage your time to fit in both marketing and creating art, and whether or not you should donate art for silent auctions (the answer may surprise you!).

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 27 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads 0:23
Thank you, Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions. So here’s a question from K.C. in Alaska, Washington. I hope I got that right. She says coming from a life of entrepreneurial marketing efforts, I have found that marketing becomes time consuming and it interferes with me doing my art. Is it possible to do both marketing and art? Well, how do I manage to do both timewise. Well, that’s a lot loaded question. Is it possible? Yes, there are many, many, many hundreds of probably thousands of artists who do it well. And if you look through art history, some of the painters who became known were really good at marketing. Mastering marketing is a really important thing. How do you manage a time wise? Well, we’ll talk about that. First off, you need to consider that as an artist selling your artwork, you’re really self employed, you’re running a small business. There are thousands of one person small businesses out there. For instance, if you owned, let’s say, a yard service, and you were the only person mowing, well, you’d have to find time to get customers and you’d have to find time to mow and to balance your checkbook and where the other hats about, you know, getting your fuel or whatever else happens to be part of it. It’s really no different for an artist you just need to embrace the business side of your art and set aside some time for it. The reality is most of us can’t paint for eight to 10 hours a day. Anyway, we need a diversion we need a break we need to get our mind away from the painting step away is what they say. Right? So you Use some of that time for marketing. I also think the more time you can spend on marketing, the more you’ll sell, and actually, the less you’ll have to pay. I know that sounds counterintuitive, but the best artists, the most successful artists are the ones who paint fewer paintings and get more money for them, because they’re in such high demand. So if you were to take for instance, 20% of your time, or one day a week, out of a five day week, you would crush it, you would just totally change everything about your life in terms of marketing. Now you got to get up to speed you got to learn marketing, you got to understand it a little bit more sounds like you already do. But your life could change and you’d sell a lot more paintings just by taking 20% of your time. Or maybe just take you know two or three hours every day in between painting times around lunchtime or whatever time you know pick out the times you think are best for your painting. When do you do your best painting have the clearest head for that what are the times when you’re painting is it best and you can use that for your marketing, your planning, your shipping, those kinds of things. Just like painting you need to Give yourself permission to know that marketing takes time. It’s not going to be overnight. But it’s going to be a little overwhelming in the beginning, but just pick one or two things to focus on. Don’t get too overwhelmed. I’ve got a blog on marketing. It’s at art marketing, calm, and it’s free. You can get a lot of ideas there.

Eric Rhoads 3:17
The next question comes from Henry in Washington, it doesn’t say which Washington state or city anyway, from time to time I get requests to donate my art for a silent auction. What are your thoughts on participating in silent auctions? You know, I get this question a lot, Henry. And I always give the same answer. artists don’t like them, because they think they’re not going to get paid for their painting and they think getting a tax deduction is impossible. Although tax laws recently changed, you might be able to deduct more than time and materials No, but consider it an advertising expense. Would you pay a lot of money to get in front of a lot of affluent people who could buy your paintings? Of course you would. So consider this that opportunity. Now you don’t necessary Want to do every silent auction you want to do the ones that have rich people or fluid people, you know people who can spend money, people who are going to spend money fighting over those prizes, but you don’t just give up a painting you always want to look for what can I get in return. So in my book, for instance, I talk about preeminence marketing and how to become preeminent. And to be preeminent means that you’re going to be highlighted, you’re going to have something special. So what I would do is I’d say something like this, just say when they ask you so you know, let’s let’s get on the phone, I want to talk about this. You say Listen, I’m going to give you a really expensive painting, you know, a painting worth a couple thousand dollars or maybe more, and it’s probably gonna be one of the best most sought after prices. But in exchange, I need you to do the following number one, I want you to feature my painting on all of your advertising and marketing postcards website etc. as one of the primary items in the silent auction by painting and my photo needs to be the most prominent and needs to have … my name, and maybe the name of the painting and say that it’s one of the top prizes, and it’s valued at whatever the price happens to be we agree on. Secondly, your signage at the event needs to do the same thing. Number three, I need admission to the event number four. And of course, you need admission so you can work the room number four, I need access to the list of everybody who attended, or preferably even everybody who was invited, and I need the ability to contact those people. Now, if they’re not, if you’re not going to let me do that, then I need to be able to put out a business card bowl and we’ll have a separate prize for another painting. And I’ll collect the business cards and I’ll contact them on my own subtly and tastefully, of course, and since I’m giving you this valuable prize, I also need you to recognize me on stage, just a simple introduction. We’d like our special guests, the artists who donated this top prize, your name to stand up and you know, give a round of applause kind of a thing and maybe read a small you know, paragraph about me. So that that makes it makes sense. This is going to help me because if I’m going to spend a couple hundred thousand, I made a couple hundred thousand. Well, it could be I suppose if I’m going to spend a couple thousand dollars for the painting on you and frames and everything else I need to get something in return. Now what you want to think about there’s 500 wealthy people in that room? Would it be worth a $2,000 painting? You bet it would, of course, you need an immediate plan to follow up with that list, you need a way to make sure that they get your marketing materials or get invited to your website or your studio. And you need to understand that one time of anything is at the answer. So you want to do multiple charity events. And if you do that consistently become a local superstar. We have a whole program in our marketing in the box thing where we talk about how to do this. It’s very powerful anyway, it’s gonna be uncomfortable in the beginning to ask because you’re not used to doing that. But if you want you can have somebody else do it for you to have somebody who can represent you in that case so that you don’t cave in. That’s it. possibility away. I hope it helps. And I hope this marketing minute has been valuable.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-07-24T13:55:56-04:00August 3rd, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 26

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains what to do if your art is “taboo” for most galleries and collectors, and why galleries might not give you the names of buyers.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 26 >>>

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads
Thank you Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions. Here’s one from Lisa See, and I’m not sure where Lisa is from but it says, Eric, I love listening to your podcast and your book is something I dig into every day. It’s full of great practical information. Thank you for that Lisa. As a pastel artists I strive not only to produce the best work possible, but to educate current and potential collectors about this fabulous medium but There’s always a button right? But pastels are still taboo for most galleries. My work is selling and for that I’m grateful. But I am wondering if I’m spinning my wheels and thinking that I can really make more money with this medium. I make it a goal to always talk about what pastels are when a prospective buyer enters my show booth. And I was flattered to have been the first pastel list in the collection of a recent avid collector. I really don’t want to migrate to oils because I’m so passionate about pastels, but I do want to make a living at it as well. I know it’s hard to give advice, but I would appreciate hearing your thoughts on this subject. Lisa? Well, first off, do what you love, paint what you love, follow the medium you love. If you switch to oils and you’re not into oils, then you’re making a career doing something you don’t love. You might as well get a job driving a bus and you wouldn’t love that either. Probably except I don’t want to offend bus drivers who might be doing that but you You need to be focusing on what you love. That answers the question first and foremost. Secondly, if you look at Richard McKinley, I mean, this is a guy who’s made tremendous success selling pastels through galleries. And so I would suggest maybe a phone call to Richard and say, Hey, Richard, how did you do it? And Richard probably face these issues too. But I think it’s an education issue, right? You need to educate people about pastels, whether it’s galleries, whether it’s collectors or otherwise, when you’re in your own, show your own environment, you have the opportunity to be able to educate when you have your life in the hands of somebody else who’s selling your work. And they don’t necessarily believe in pastels, well, you might have a problem there. So I always talk about mindset, right? So the mindset of the gallery has to do with pricing has to do with everything. So if the gallery that’s representing you isn’t into pastels, and they’re going to push oils first, then you need to work on educating them and helping them under And what’s happened with the pastels and how popular they are and how many galleries are selling them. And if they can’t get it, then maybe you need to find somebody who can get it because there are a lot of people out there who do it. This plenty of pastels selling very, very well and selling at great prices. And if you look historically, there’s great pastels in museums. There’s no reason to think pastel is an inferior medium medium at any stretch. I mean, look at Albert handbell. I mean he does oils and pastels like Richard does. But Albert has made a great living as a pastel s. And so I think those days of those old ideas are gone. And though there may be some people clinging to them, I think you can help them through it. I hope that helps, Lisa. All right.

Eric Rhoads
Now, the next question comes from Cindy in Sedona. She says, I want to know the names of the buyers when my gallery sells a painting, but they won’t give them to me. What should I do? Well, whatever Something like that happens. You want to put yourself in their shoes and you want to ask yourself, why are they being so obstinate? Well, there’s probably a reason. For instance, if you were to ask, they’d probably say, Well, I had somebody who I gave the names to, and then they contacted the collectors directly. And they sold them directly, and I didn’t get the commission. And I fired the artist. That’s probably what it sounds like. So they’re a little bit concerned about you stealing from them. So I think the first thing you do is deal with these things up front, when you sign on with a gallery, because you need a contract Anyway, you need an agreement that states things like you’re going to get your paintings back there on consignment, and if they go bankrupt, you have the right to pull them out of the gallery, which you’re going to need for a judge in the event somebody goes bankrupt. So you might as well put in some other things like this in it and deal with it upfront. And they may or may not do it. The other thing is if you’re not dealing with it upfront, you can have a little agreement that you can put together that just says I promise if I hear direct from people who have been in the gallery or have bought paintings from, from the gallery, I will not sell direct. Secondly, I think it’s important to show the gallery why it’s important for you. First off people buy from people they know and they like and if you can develop a relationship, let them see your newsletters, hear the stories of your adventures, see other paintings. And then you can also say in your newsletter, you know, here are the galleries that represent me, or maybe it’s just that one gallery, then you’re doing a good thing. And so you want to get newsletters and things like that in their hands because it’s going to help sell more stuff. And again, they have to feel confident you’re not going to be traded them. Third, I think you need a backup. Lots of galleries have gone out of business, and you’re never going to get the names after they go out of business. And so I think it’s a good idea to say I want the names that as long as they can trust you, it shouldn’t be a problem. But you also want the bond To feel like you care about them to help get connected to you, my gallery sends me the name and address of buyers and asked me to send them a nice note. Now they don’t send me the email phone number which is okay with me. And you can do something more than a note, you can send them a gift box of the note cards with their painting on it, and on the back can say from the collection of and put their name on it. And then you can put your name on it and the name and title of the painting and your website, which means they’re writing notes to their friends promoting you which isn’t a bad thing either. So and you could even say your website or you could say available from XYZ gallery you know, that might make the gallery happier.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-07-08T08:09:49-04:00July 27th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments
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