Each week, Eric Rhoads answers two art marketing questions from listeners like you during the Marketing Minute Podcast. Browse the marketing minutes here to learn tips on how to sell more art.

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 4

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, you’ll learn how to build your confidence if you feel as though you’re “too shy” to begin selling your art and why it’s important to go to (and network!) at painting events.

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 4

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer 0:02
This is the art marketing minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book make more money selling your art. In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads 0:23
Thank you, Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions.

Here’s a question from Chuck in Atlanta. Chuck says, Eric, I want to sell more. But I’m overwhelmed by all the things I should be doing. And frankly, I’m not sure if I can even ask somebody to buy my paintings. I’m kind of shy.

Well, Chuck, you’re not so shy that you wouldn’t ask the question. So that’s a good start. You’re not alone. But you have to ask yourself if being shy is serving you or it’s getting in your way. I’d say The best thing you can do is start out to seek ways to build some confidence, and maybe get you comfortable with selling your own art. Now, this is going to be hard to believe for you. But I was a complete introvert, very shy, very afraid to speak to people one on one, and never get in front of a group. And yet today, I’ll stand in front of thousands of people and be silly and feel comfortable with it. And I learned how to do this by some of the things I’m going to tell you to do. One of the things I’m going to tell you to do or suggest anyway, to build confidence, join Toastmasters club, they have one in every town, and Toastmasters really teaches you how to speak in front of other people. I was mortified. I went and I didn’t want to go. My palms were sweating. I was just like freaking out that I was gonna have to talk to people. And they made everybody kind of stand up and do 3030 seconds on who they are and what they do. And that was pretty tough. And then you know, they just do it every time and everybody gets a chance to speak and they teach you how to do it. And by the end of the time there I was like I could have stood up In front of that whole thing and done somersaults, I was so so happy with it. So that’ll help you. I’d also suggest a Dale Carnegie course on how to win friends and influence people, it’s a good way to learn how to be around people. And they also do a sales course, you might want to take that. So anyway, keep that in mind. And remember, sales is not what it used to be there. You know, there used to be old school sales techniques that were sleazy. But you know, today, it doesn’t have to be that way. You know, some of the car dealers still operate that way, but most of them don’t. And so you want to do things that basically are helping people discover what they want, helping them discover how to get what they want. And these courses will help you see the world through a different lens and help you get out of your comfort zone. And we all have to get out of our comfort zone to grow a little bit. If you do these things, you’ll pull yourself out to some new behavior and get rid of the behavior that’s not serving you. I didn’t want to be shy but I was painfully shy and I just you know, I didn’t know how to overcome it. somebody suggested these things to me and I did them. And you’re very capable of helping yourself. If you do something, but you gotta take action to do it today. Don’t hem and haw around about it. Just do it, pick up the phone and do it.

Next question is from Dawn in Pasadena, California. I love Pasadena. I’d like to live there. Mr. Rhoads, I watched one of your video interviews and you talked about the importance of getting out to events and meeting people and how it can help your career. Can you tell me more about that?

Sure. I can Dawn But first off Mr. Rhoads is my grandfather. Call me Eric. I’m not big on formalities. Have you ever heard of the artist Charlie Hunter? Charlie’s become pretty well. Well known pretty famous these days. Charlie had come to my paint camp in the Adirondacks, the Publishers Invitational I think it was the first year about 10 years ago. And though he was very outgoing, personally, he was very insecure about his painting and he had never been part of the planner community and had hardly even painted outdoors but Because we all bring our paintings in at night, everybody looks at them, we all started noticing how good he was. And he started building confidence. I noticed him too. And I gave him my two cents worth about his paintings and that I loved him. In fact, I have three of them right here in the studio, the podcast studio that I bought from him that week. And I’m glad I did because they’ve gone up in value tremendously anyway, not that that’s why I … my paintings. But I ended up doing an article about … starting to get invited to painter events. And then he started winning awards, and now he’s famous and he’s selling a ton of work. His workshops are in high demand, and he’s a rock star. And that all kind of started because he got himself out there. Now I’m not suggesting for a minute that I did this for him. He did this by taking a chance putting himself out there putting himself at risk. And he built confidence from others. He got feedback, he learned the ropes of the planner world and met a lot of people, made a lot of contacts and made his career happened. Actually, Lori Putnam did the same thing by coming to the first plein air convention. She couldn’t even afford to go but she decided she needed to be there and she got there she got notice kept coming back. Of course she’s very famous now. And I just saw a young guy at our fall color week up in Canada recently. And his name is Jed and Jed came to fall color week I noticed everybody was marveling about his paintings, and he does acrylics and they’re beautiful. So the event gave him some exposure to the crowd and gave him some confidence resulting in some things happening in his career. And I even ended up putting them up on the faculty for the acrylic at plein air convention. So I think it’s a pretty cool thing to do stuff like this getting out there is really important. It doesn’t have to be one of my events. Doesn’t have to be a planner magazine event. It can be anywhere painters gather but you want to get out there get to know people have them get to know your work, help you build your confidence, learn the ropes, and you got to take a little risk to make progress. You’ll make friends that will help you along the way because no man or no woman is an island right? I hope this helps. Anyway, that’s Not so much direct marketing or advertising advice, but these things are important in marketing, so I thought this was a good time to put those questions in there. Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artist and to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-02-05T14:36:57-05:00February 24th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 3

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, you’ll learn keys to selling art on Facebook on Instagram and how to get exposure through your local media outlets.

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 3

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer: 0:02
This is the art marketing minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book make more money selling your art. In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by art marketing. com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads 0:23
Thank you, Jim kipping. And thank you for joining us today. I am here. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions. So here’s a question from Cindy P. of Phoenix, Arizona. Cindy says, What’s the key to selling artwork on Instagram? or Facebook?

Well, that’s a big one. Well, first, I think it’s important to understand that we all think that we have an instant market if we have a big number of followers, let’s say got 5000 followers, and we think that every time we do a post, everybody’s gonna see everything we do. It’s not true Facebook owns Instagram, Instagram and Facebook are the same company. And they’re trying to force people to buy ads for exposure. So the algorithm that they use is only pushing out 2% of what you push out to your followers. That means very small number of your followers ever see what you post and it seems to be the same ones over and over and over again, the ones that interact with you the most, don’t assume people are seeing it. Secondly, though, we hear all these great stories about selling paintings. As we examine some of these stories, some are true. Others have other linkage to other things that have gone on that just happened to be kind of implemented through Instagram or Facebook, though there are people who are selling on Facebook, Instagram, the ones who sell well tend to have huge numbers, hundred 200,000 followers. There are exceptions to that but yet large numbers that increase your odds. I’ll be doing a lot on Instagram and Facebook at the Art marketing bootcamp sessions with the planner convention but a couple of things to think about First off, don’t try to sell to turn off people are there For content, so for every time you ask for something, you need 10 times you’re not doing any asking, you’re just doing content, so 10 to one ratio. So positive post lots and lots of content, spread it out. Not all at the same time I was on Instagram or Facebook or something the other day and it’s like 10 things in a row from the same guy. It’s like I defended him, I just didn’t want to see all that. So spread it out. Spread it out throughout the day, different people look at different times. And so you want to make sure that you spread it out. Secondly, repeat content. Just because it’s been out there one time doesn’t mean you can’t repeat it. You can look for a different way to say it. But the same people aren’t always seeing it so it’s good time to repeat things. Secondly, comment often commenting and interacting with people builds your feed exposure, look for ways to comment on other people’s posts. If you look smart people will wonder who you are and they’ll visit your page. And if they find good content, they will friend you and stays good way to build but also the interactive is really good for your algorithm. So they’re looking for people who are interactive. If somebody’s commenting a lot, now you have to be careful about click bait. Gotta be careful about saying, you know, click here if you think this or whatever, because they’re looking for people who do that and you will get penalized. Next, keep in mind that birds of a feather tend to flock together. Most artists follow other artists, it’s probably rare for a collector to follow you. It does happen, of course, but we’re learning that artists are buying lots of art, so that’s okay, too. So when you put it out there look for subtle ways of saying it’s available, like, you know, thinking of sending this to my gallery, if it doesn’t sell here, the next 24 hours, they’re going to get the drift. You don’t have to say, if you’re interested by here, you want to be creative about this stuff.

Here’s another question from Larry K. of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He says I’m constantly seeing stories about other artists and local media. How do I get some of that action? Well, Larry’s squeaky wheel gets the grease, most of those people that get stories didn’t just have happened to randomly get discovered. They made phone calls, they put out press releases, they were talking to people. You want to assume that frequency is important at all marketing. One time doesn’t get you anything one time advertising one time on of Instagram posts one time on anything doesn’t help. You want frequency repetition, repetition, repetition. So call editors, meet them over the phone, tell them your story. Send pre written stories because editors get into binds Oh no, they’ve got a story they got to put in tomorrow in the end, the thing fell through, send them lots of photographs and things that are going to get their interest.

So pre written stories can help because if they’re in a bind, you can hire a PR firm, but that’s expensive, but that’s just what they do. They just call people. They get to know people and they know them and they call them and say here’s a tip. I’ve got this thing about this artist. You could do that but it’s going to cost you a lot of money and that’s okay. That’s what they do and they’re good at it sometimes and sometimes Not, but it’s really just about getting to know people. Now the other thing is, don’t tell us this I have, I can’t tell you how many times I get this into such a frustrating thing. They’ll send them a note and they’ll say, you know, here’s I’d like you to do a story on me. And by the way, I was just featured in this magazine, this magazine, this magazine. Well, the last thing I want to do is put something in that everybody else has done, I try to be unique. I don’t want to be putting things in that everybody else has done. So when you tell me that, I don’t want to hear it. So if it has happened, first off, if you’ve just been in five other magazines, I do a story about you and I find out about it. It’s not going to make me happy, but I’m going to feel burned. But if you’ve got something unique, you know, pick out somebody and say hey, I want you to do a story on this. I’d like you to consider this be nice about it and say you know you’ve got the exclusive on this. I’m not going to give it to anybody else. If you pick it up and then that gives you an opportunity to go up here. Here’s something unique and interesting.

Well, this has been the Art marketing minute with me Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artist and to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] marketing.com. And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com Thanks for listening.

Remember to Submit Your Question: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

By |2020-02-05T14:36:42-05:00February 17th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 2

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, you’ll learn what you should be doing right now to plan for your yearly art goals and how the company you keep can affect your “halo marketing.”

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 2

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the art marketing minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book make more money selling your art. In the marketing minutes we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by arts marketing. com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:
Thank you Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions.

Here’s a question from William in Providence, Rhode Island. William says it’s a new year. What should I be doing to plan my marketing for the new year?
Well, William, ideally you want to start in November or December or before that but it is still early so you’ve got the whole rest of the year. Start always in all marketing, don’t put tactics first. Try to figure out what you want to accomplish. To start with the end in mind, what do you want to accomplish this year might be travel, it might be dollar figures, it might be being in certain shows, it might be other things, but try to figure out what those things are. Let’s say it’s money. So let’s talk about it. So let’s say for instance, that you want to make $100,000 a year last year, you were $80,000 a year. So start by asking yourself what work to get you at $80,000. Now ask if doing more of the same will get you there, it may or may not. We always tend to say if we want to make more money, we have to sell more stuff, but that’s not always the answer. There are other answers. For instance, selling at a higher price. Let’s say last year, you sold 40 paintings at $2,000 each. What if you could sell 40 paintings at 20 $500 each you would reach just by adding $500 more per painting, you would reach your hundred thousand dollar goal if that’s the money that you get to keep right. So if that’s if the galleries involved you might have to up it a little bit more. But think in terms of what can I do that makes my job easier because it’s always tough enough out there. Or let’s say you want to sell a quarter of the people who bought paintings, sell them two paintings at a time instead of one is there a way you can do that as their way you can do what we call an upsell. Try to get someone who say, since you already bought this, I’m going to offer you a discount on the second one, if you do that today, that kind of a thing. also define your goals against your current status and then start laying out a plan. And if you need to sell more, just find more ways to reach more buyers. And that’s all about promotion, advertising, PR, etc. lay out a month by month plan and then stick with it and just know that everything you do doesn’t happen overnight. It takes repetition, repetition, say that again. Repetition, right. All things in advertising and promotion are about repetition because it takes time for people to build trust, to get to know you and to be aware of you. It doesn’t happen overnight.

Next question is from Tanja of Oakland, California.
Tanya says at last year’s convention, you said that you’re known for the company you keep. Can you explain what that means as it relates to marketing? Well, Tanya, there’s a principle I like to call Halo marketing. You get the halo effect the glow of someone else, by your association. Let’s say for instance, that somebody famous buys one of your paintings. How can you use that to your advantage? People tend to want what celebrities have. That’s why celebrities get a lot of money as spokespeople. So let’s say that Steven Spielberg owns one of your paintings. Why not find ways to tastefully spread the word that Spielberg’s one of your buyers? That means a lot, you know, because people love stories? Wouldn’t it be cool if the gallery was able to say hey, by the way, Spielberg owns one of these are to be able to say, Hey, I own a painting that also the artist is owned by Spielberg. I don’t recommend you doing it without permission. But you could ask permission. Let’s say for instance, you sold Painting to Steven Spielberg, you could say, hey, by the way, would you be willing to allow me to mention this to the people? I know I want to respect your privacy, but it’ll help me a lot. Because obviously, you’re famous. And if you own one, others are going to want to own one, would you mind? And sometimes they’ll say yes, sometimes they’ll say No, don’t do it. If they say no, and always do it tastefully. There’s also another principle and that is that the association with others can be important in other ways. For instance, there’s a meat company called Allen steaks they sell by direct marketing. And they put the names of famous steakhouses on their brochures, people that use their steaks, what does that imply? It implies that you get the same experience by buying from them as you would from those steak houses, right? So that’s what I mean there’s a value in being in the hands of prominent people, prominent collectors, important museums, even important galleries because people know people who are in the know and know that if you’re in a particular gallery that’s really important. That says you’re pretty high quality and that’s going to be helpful to You overall makes you look even more important, but you want to be careful about how you do it. You don’t want to overdo it. You don’t want to be a name dropper, you don’t want to look brash. You want to be more subtle about it. Maybe that’s quotes by others, like having a quote on your brochure from Steven Spielberg or photo with Steven Spielberg or something. If somebody else is saying it, it’s a lot better than if you’re saying it, but there are ways you can do it. And then it’s a little bit more implied than direct Hope that helps help these marketing tips are helpful for you. Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artist and to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] Thanks for listening.

By |2020-02-05T14:36:10-05:00February 10th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 1

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com.

In this Art Marketing Minute, you’ll learn a quick tip on where to start if you’re not selling art online yet, and specific ways to help your gallery sell your paintings.

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 1

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

Related Links:
– Sunday Coffee: https://coffeewitheric.com/

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the art marketing minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book make more money selling your art. In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by art marketing. com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:
Thank you Jim Kipping. And thank you for joining us today. I am here. My goal is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists. So let’s get right to today’s questions. Here’s a question from Carrol in the Sierras. I guess that’s the highest year is California, huh Carol? Welcome. I’m at a crossroads regarding my art. It seems that I’m throwing good money after bad. I’m not a rank beginner. However, I thought that I should check everything and start again from scratch. Here’s why. About five months ago. I got my own website in that five months I’ve had only 10 people look at the site, and no buyers, I do not in most cases seem to be able to tell which my paintings are the better ones. I’m quite discouraged at this point. The art ship may have already sailed for me. I have no clients. I have no client list. I don’t know anyone who would buy my art. Help.

Carol, you sound desperate, my dear goodness. Don’t give up. Don’t ever give up. Never ever went to Churchill said don’t ever ever, ever, ever, never, never, never, ever give up right? paid first because you’ll love it if you paint because you love it. That’s a good starting point. If that’s not the reason you’re doing it, maybe that’s something you shouldn’t be doing. But I have a hunch you can do it because I looked at your website and your paintings are pretty good. And so look at it from this standpoint, if it sells its icing on the cake. Now if you have to make a living as a painter, just know that it takes some time. You have to devote time and energy into building it. Now I put together a thing for people that are interested in senior years retiring and so on, it’s kind of about how to start up fast and so on. I don’t remember the name; it’s of one of my videos. Anyway, there’s some stuff in there that talks about how to speed up the process. But the reality is that if you have a website that doesn’t guarantee you’re going to get any visitors, you had 10 visitors, that’s not necessarily any visitors, right? So you’ve got to look for ways to drive people and drive traffic to your website, and that’s going to require some marketing effort. You can get some free advice on my marketing blog. There’s a lot of stuff on there about driving people to websites and how to get people to do it. Sometimes it’s advertising, sometimes it’s social media, sometimes it’s direct mail, sometimes it’s other things but you just kind of be constantly driving people to the website. And or looking for other people to sell your work for you. Your work is pretty good. It should be in a gallery and you should probably start doing that process. I again, I have a whole process and some of my videos where I go through that but you want to get introduced in are invited in not not so much going after him because everybody else’s going after me, I want to be different. You want to see how you can get invited and I’ve got a whole strategy on that. And that involves getting the word out to other people through people that are connected to the gallery. So more on that at another time anyway, don’t give up. Don’t get discouraged, you’re going to be fine. And just hang in there. Everybody goes through this. This is not unusual.

Next question is from Jo Ann and Lincoln, Nebraska. Congratulate me. I just got into my first gallery. Well, Joanne, congratulations. But so far, they’ve not sold anything yet. I know there’s some great painters in the gallery. So what can I do to help my painting sell?

Well, Joanne, the fact that you got into a gallery, you’re one of a very few and so congratulations on that. The fact that they have other great painters in the gallery means they have good taste, and they picked you so I wouldn’t worry too much about that. trust them. It’s going to take them some time. They have to build a collector interest in a collector base and it might take them some But you can help them in a lot of ways. But the first thing is, ask them what you can do. It’s surprising to me how many people never asked that question. So ask the gallery owner, ask them, you know, how can I help you? Secondly, there’s some things you could do. It just depends on how far you want to go. First off, you can talk about the fact that if you’ve got your own list, if you’ve got your own newsletter, if you’ve got your own social media accounts, you can talk up the fact that you’re in the gallery and put these paintings out there that are in the gallery and drive people to the gallery. That’s something you can do. It’s not all up to them. Marketing is a cooperative effort. Speaking of cooperative, one of the things you can do is what we call Co Op advertising. You can actually share in the expense, you can go to them and say hey, listen, I’d like you to advertise my work. And I think it would be great to be exposed and have my name associated with your gallery. I’ll pay half if you’ll pay half. And so that’s one good way to do it. A lot of people do that kind of thing. You can ask permission to talk to the sales team asked for a conference call and ask. Tell them your story. Make it about your story and how you got where you are and what you do and what your thoughts and philosophies are. Keep it interesting, because the sales team, whoever is selling your paintings, sometimes it’s just the owner. But maybe they need to know about you and don’t assume they’re going to read anything about you make it easy for them. I like to give stories with my paintings stories help sell, I like to write up a little story about every painting, put a little bit of fantasy and a little bit of reality in it. And then I I paste that on the back of the painting, sometimes I’ll mail it to the galleries. And then they like to sometimes put it up on the placard underneath the name of the painting and the cost because it gives a little story creates a little interest. And by the way, very few people do story so you’re going to stand out, and stories oftentimes help sell. So I got a whole thing on stories in my first and my second videos and so you might check those out. Keep the gallery informed, tell them what you’re up to anything new. If you’re taking trips, traveling, painting entry, interesting things. If you’re on the faculty at a flare convention or something like that, tell them because it gives them stuff to talk about. They need stuff to talk about when they’re talking about you. keep them informed. You know, it’s amazing how many artists don’t keep them informed. But don’t overdo it. Don’t badger them because they’re busy people and be grateful, you know, they’re going to want to help people who are grateful. And so rather than calling and saying, Why didn’t you sell my paintings yet? Instead, what you want to do is say, Hey, thank you. I appreciate all you’re doing. I’m really grateful for you guys. Because people when people are nice, they want to help them right. Anyway, that’s some marketing advice. I hope it’s helpful.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artist and to help your dreams actually come true. Thanks for listening.

By |2020-02-05T14:37:36-05:00January 28th, 2020|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|2 Comments