Each week, Eric Rhoads answers two art marketing questions from listeners like you during the Marketing Minute Podcast. Browse the marketing minutes here to learn tips on how to sell more art.

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 103

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com. 

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads shares reflections on how artists can plan for retirement; and options for putting your painting behind glass, and when you should (or shouldn’t).

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 103 >

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

In the marketing minute I try to answer your marketing questions from well from your emails. Just email me [email protected] Here’s a question from Laura in Eureka Springs, Arkansas, who says I’m close to the age when most people start thinking of retirement. But what does retirement look like for an artist? Do I have time to build a retirement fund from selling art? Well, look, Laura, I am very much a believer that age is a state of mind now obviously ages a physical thing. But I know people like my dad, you know, 93 years old, working 15 hour days, happy, making money, doing great things socially active, and I know people in their 50s who can’t get out of bed, and some of its physical and some of its metal. Alright, so I can’t predict what you personally can do. And of course, I don’t give financial advice. I’m not qualified. And I don’t know what your needs are. But let’s kind of approach this from a generic standpoint. First, I think obviously, all of us should be looking to do the best we can to save, put money away invest some money, overtime, before we get to retirement age, because you never know what’s going to happen. You never know if you’re going to have a health problem and not be able to work. I encounter people all the time about the idea of making a little extra money in what they refer to as retirement, a lot of people who’ve worked in other jobs, a lot of doctors and psychologists and architects and professionals of all kinds, who become artists, and a lot of them who were you know, never had those kind of jobs but had some kind of job. And so some of them want to do it just because they want to be part of the lifestyle, they want to be part of the shows, some of them don’t need the money, some of them want to just make an extra 500 or 1000 bucks a month, you know, to supplement their social security, or their investments. And some of them, you know, they want to make a full Fallout living. So what you got to do is build a plan, you got to figure out what is it that you need? How do you get there. But I think you know, being an artist is a beautiful thing for a retired person. And of course, you can’t really look at yourself as retired, if you’re becoming if you’re taking on a job as an artist to make an income, you’re not retired, you’ve just changed jobs, right? Your job is to be an artist who makes money. And if you don’t have to be an artist to make money, if you want to be an artist who doesn’t make money, then your job is to be an artist. And then you can be kind of more casual about it. But you got to be disciplined. Anytime that you have to make a certain amount of money, you have to follow a discipline, a marketing discipline, a management discipline, and so on. And that’s just kind of part of the deal. When you’re anything you’re trying to do to make money. It’s just like you got to manage your money when you have a job, right. So I did a couple of couple years ago, I did a marketing session that was designed for people who want to quit their job and start painting full time it was called How to Quit your dirty, rotten stinking job and become a full time successful artist or something like that. Anyway, it’s and there’s a video floating out there somewhere, I think it’s streamline art video. And the concept is that you can do it, it’s best to start your career and gradually ramp up your income before you leave or before you retire. And that way you’ve ramped up your income before you quit. And that way, you’ve kind of proven that you can do it, then you don’t have to kind of scramble all the time. I think that’s a good way to do it. But there’s lots of other strategies too. And the idea is, you have to understand that if you’re going to sell your work, depending on the level of sales you’re looking for, you have to brand yourself, you have to build a reputation you have to market yourself. Branding is all about building trust and awareness. Right? So people will if it’s down to two paintings, and they’re both equally beautiful, and they can’t decide they’re gonna go they’re gonna default to the brand. That’s I was in the shoe store today. And I was kind of down to two pair of shoes. I liked that they liked them both. I didn’t need them both. And finally I said, Well, I’m going to take this one because I know the brand a little better. It was actually a little bit more expensive, but I felt more confident with that brand. So that’s kind of how it works. I hope this helps anyway, nothing good is easy. I’d be lying to if I said it wasn’t easy, or was easy, but you’ve just got it you know, you could take it on. And you know you may have different levels of energy than you did when you were 12 or 30. But I have the same energy quite frankly. So I’m just crushing it. And you can do it to it. But you know, you got to work at it, you got to there’s a lot of stuff you have to do physically and mentally and everything else. So anyway, hope this helps you.

The next question is from Carolyn in Houston, who says, How do I know if I should put my artwork under glass? I’m ready to sell a piece. Does the type of glass matter? Kind of an interesting question, Carolyn, I’m not sure how to answer it exactly. But most artwork that’s under glass is art that has a chance of fading. Or maybe getting damaged, like pastels oftentimes are under glass so that the, the, you know, your hands don’t get on him. Of course, you can spray fixatives on them. But watercolors are oftentimes under glass too. So some of the newer watercolor pigments don’t fade. But the reason they put them under glass originally is to protect them, but also so that they didn’t fade or so that the cleaning lady didn’t come along and spray it with some kind of a substance that made it run that would be a disaster, I’ve seen it happen. Anyway, the type of glass matters, most people suggest what they call museum glass, it’s more expensive. It’s non glare. And of course it has UV filtering to keep the fading from happening. But you know, glass complicates everything. Plus complicate shipping, you got to be more careful, you got to pack it better. If you’re somebody like me, who’s out you’re doing shows you got to carry glass with you, you got to frames and you know, it’s a lot of hassle. So that’s why a lot of people paid in other mediums when they’re plein air, especially if they’re doing shows just because they don’t have to carry glass, quite frankly. But that’s up to you. Back in the late 1800s 1800s. There were they put oils under glass. Matter of fact, I have a beautiful old Dutch 19th century painting maybe 18th century painting in front of me that’s framed under glass, the whole frame is under glass, and there’s a built a box built around it. And I asked the art dealer about this. And he said well they did that because at the time there were a lot of coal stoves, people were smoking cigarettes and cigars, and there were you know, fireplaces and in these things would get covered with soot. So all they had to do is clean the glass instead of clean the painting. But as I stare at that painting, I’m seeing reflections of myself in my paperwork. And it’s not as beautiful as it could be because it’s not non glare glass because it’s well over 100 years old, but you get the drift anyway. So I think you just kind of decide what you want to put up with and whether it’s worth it. You know, a lot of people will put things hang things with glass in their homes all the time. You know, they have pictures under glass and documents under glass glass is very common. I wouldn’t worry about that. I hope that answers your question. And I don’t think glass is a deterrent.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.


> Visit EricRhoads.com (Publisher of ArtMarketing.com) to learn about opportunities for artists and art collectors, including:

  • Art retreats
  • International art trips
  • Art conventions
  • Art workshops (in person and online)
  • And more!
By |2021-12-13T11:48:25-05:00January 24th, 2022|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 102

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com. 

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads answers the questions: Is direct mail still an effective way to reach buyers? And, how do you transition from a day job to being a full-time artist?

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 102 >

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

In the marketing minute I try to answer your questions you can of course send them to me anytime, [email protected] Here’s a question from Christopher, in Avalon, California. Wow, that’s a beautiful place. Christopher says is direct mail still a good way to reach potential buyers, and if so what’s the best way to get started? Christopher, you’re onto something, you’re using your dog. And I appreciate that. Listen, everybody’s addicted to social media right now. And there’s good reason social media advertising is effective. But it’s not the only thing that’s effective. And one thing that happens is the prices are going up and up and up and up. And the cost of reaching people on social media, if you do it properly, is really getting expensive now, and the cost of direct mail is really hasn’t changed. The direct mail was one of those things that years ago, before the internet kind of took hold. Everybody sent everything by direct mail. And one thing nice about direct mail is you don’t have the open rate problem. You know, if you have a compelling envelope or compelling postcard, they’re gonna see it, you’re going to get some message across to them, chances are you’ve got a pretty likelihood of good likelihood of getting seen. So I you know, I think direct mail is very effective, I still do it. I don’t do it all the time. It’s not cheap, like email, you got to print and you got to mail. But you know, the cost of a customer, a good customer can be high. And you got to be willing to spend to get a customer now I created this program called Art marketing in a box. And there’s a whole section in there on direct mail and a whole series of campaigns on direct mail, I have a lady who told me I don’t know, a few months ago, maybe a year ago that she just did the direct mail portion didn’t do any of the emails didn’t do any of the newsletters didn’t do the other stuff. And she doubled her business. And she already had a pretty good business, direct mail campaigns work, but everything in all marketing, all marketing, same principles apply. It’s about media and message. What media are you using? What message are you sending? And how much frequency are you repeating that when I do a direct mail, I typically repeat it. I learned something a long time ago from one of my mentors, he said, take the same thing that you mail, wait three weeks, and mail it again, don’t change a word. And he said, see what happens. And he was right about as many people bought the first time, it’s the second time. So what that sometimes means is you know, you didn’t catch them at the right time, or maybe they were going to buy and then they forgot, this comes as a reminder. And then they buy. And also when you’re selling art, it’s not necessarily about buy this painting, you know, you’re you’re branding yourself, you’re getting them familiar with you, you’re inviting them to your studio to your open studio to your open house or whatever. And then over time, you know, as they’re thinking about, gee, I need a birthday, Christmas, Thanksgiving, whatever gift, then they might be thinking about you of course, you can put those ideas in their head with direct mail or email or anything else. So I think it’s powerful. I talked a lot about it in my book, too. And so you can have great success. But remember, everything boils down to you know, how strong is your copy? How strong is your message? How good are your graphics? You know, are you getting attention? Are you going to blend in a thing that I did in art marketing box, definitely doesn’t blend in. It’s designed to stand out. Some people don’t like that. And they kind of kind of come up with something a little bit more bland. And guess what? Bland results?

Next question comes from Cory in Phoenix, Arizona who says the what’s the best way to transition from my day job to becoming a full time artist? And how will I know when I’m ready? Well, Cory, it’s an easy answer. The best way to transition from your day job is to start your art job. And when you get your art job to the point where it’s equaling the income of your day job, then it’s time to start thinking about maybe quitting your day job. I wouldn’t do it right away, though, you want to make sure that you’ve got consistency, what I would do is I do it over three years, build it, take your time, be patient, and over three years, see if you can get to a higher income level or a matching income level as fast as possible. And that’s through marketing. And then make sure that you have a machine in place so that you’re continuing to get that kind of a level. Because if you can prove to yourself that you can get to maybe three years of income, not only will you have more income now because you’ve got your job and that but you also will have the confidence that okay, maybe it’s time to do Now a friend of mine did this. And what he did is he started his art business got his level of income up as high as he could get it, where he felt confident, then he said, Okay, I’m going to part time. And then he went part time for a year. And then he got his income higher. And then he went to even less part time and consulting. And then eventually, he just bailed out completely on them, he gave them plenty of notice, which is the right thing to do. And in the meantime, he built his career. So you know, you want to have the income crossing that is that income goes away, the other income is replacing it. That makes sense. I think that’s the best way to do it in terms of how will you know, when you’re ready. When you’re making money, quite frankly, I don’t recommend pull the plug on your job and you know, jump in the pool and just hope that it works. It takes time to learn these things. It takes practice and you know, you’ve got somebody else who’s funding the startup of your art business, by giving you a paycheck. Now, you’re going to work harder than you’ve ever worked in your life because you’re going to be working eight hours or 10 hours a day at your regular job and then six or eight hours a day at your art job for a while, maybe a couple three years. But then you know, once you’ve proven that income, you’re gonna have a lot more confidence, and then that’ll make you a lot happier because you know, you’ve got that income anyway.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.


> Visit EricRhoads.com (Publisher of ArtMarketing.com) to learn about opportunities for artists and art collectors, including:

  • Art retreats
  • International art trips
  • Art conventions
  • Art workshops (in person and online)
  • And more!
By |2021-12-13T11:36:03-05:00January 17th, 2022|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 101

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com. 

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains how to find the right society or group to fit your style; and if artists should have any direct contact with collectors when working with an art gallery.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 101 >

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

In the marketing minute I try to answer your marketing questions. You can email me, [email protected] with your questions like this one from Dylan, in Homer Alaska, what if it’s getting cold up there yet? Dylan says, I feel like I should network with other artists more? How do I find the right society or the group for me and my style? Well, Dylan, you’re right, you should, that’s a good thing. There’s tremendous value in networking with others, no matter what you’re doing. But it’s fun, it’s nice to know others around you, it’s nice to know that they have the same challenges you have, they may paint differently than you do. But that’s okay, because you’re going to learn something from everybody you meet. And they will stimulate your ideas, they’ll give you critiques and instruction. And it’s just nice to be part of something bigger part of a community. Now, I’m not very active in the local community here in Austin, Texas. I know a lot of people here, but I just don’t have a lot of time because I travel so much. But I do have my own Paint group on Wednesday nights when I’m in town. And everybody comes over to the studio. And it’s my chance for local networking. And it’s great because I hear things that are going on, I feel like a part of the community. And then you know, if like, I’m struggling with something, I could say, what would you do here with this, with this year, usually I bring a model into the studio. So it’s my form of networking. So I learned a lot from them. And I kind of created that myself. So in Homer, Alaska, if you can’t find anybody, and I’m sure there’s lots of artists there. But if you can’t start digging around, find, you know, start your own thing, go to the local art supply place, if there is one, I assure there is and post something, you know, on a bulletin board, maybe you look for something on Google or meetup or something, you’re gonna find them. People tell me all the time that they didn’t know other painters were around their area, and then they found them that connect to go painting together. I have a lot of fun. So if you haven’t got one, just start your own. That’s what it goes gets to do.

The next question is from Paul in Los Angeles. Paul talks, Paul says, I’ve heard many people say that the artist should never have contact with collectors, because that’s the galleries job. Is that true? Well, the galleries job is to help you your job is to help them. Is it true? Well, I’ll probably get some arrows through my head for answering this one. But it depends on who you ask. Right? Some gallery people will tell you absolutely. We want artists engaged. Others will tell you no, they don’t. It depends on the individual gallery owners and they have their reasons. And usually the reason is because they’ve been burned with some kind of a problem in the past. And artists doing something inappropriate, saying something inappropriate going around them, etc. But let me tell you this, a gallery owner once said to me that she had an opening invited a bunch of artists that were in the show, and instead of mingling well with the collectors, and sometimes that’s why they come to meet the artists. They all got drunk and loud and didn’t engage with other people. And one actually got so loud and so drunk that she was embarrassed and later fired that artists from the gallery. Now, the artist told me about this. And he said, Well, that’s my persona. You know, I’m a creative an artist, he said, but it turned him off and I got fired. Yep, happens. I’ve been to hundreds of art openings. And I’ve seen every imaginable horror story of inappropriate behavior. Somebody saying telling a dirty joke to a mixed crowd and and you know, somebody who’s about to buy a painting and gets disgusted and turns away. I watched an artist come on to a beautiful woman. It turned out to be a collectors wife. Not a good idea, really bad stuff. So it’s no wonder they want them to stay away in some cases. Once an artist told her I heard about had the guts to undermine a gallery the artist told the collector that he met at the gallery opening that he’d give him a better price if the painting had not sold by the end of the week. Well, how foolish was that? The guy probably would have bought it but instead, he decided to wait nobody else bought it. He contacted the guy or the artist context of the guy tried to sell it the guy was ethical and said, I’m going to call the gallery owner and gallery owner fire the artist. You just can’t do stuff like that. gallery owners need to see you as a partner to help them sell, to create create publicity to make people feel good about your work and the work in the gallery. My gallery held a reception for me recently sold two paintings during the reception. They weren’t my paintings either, but I had pointed out to a collector a couple of paintings that I really like loved, and they bought those. How cool is that? You know, may I hope another artists would do that for me someday, your gallery can tell you how they want you to be, how they want you to act, what they want you to wear, how they want you to behave, you know, you have to decide if you want to participate in that. And if not, you should probably stay away. Now, some artists are really good at interacting with collectors. They know how to be engaging and appropriate how to be tasteful, others are not good at it. Jon Stewart said that, you know, he was good at buttering people up right. So some galleries keep artists far away because they hurt sales. The key is knowing having an open dialogue and being trustworthy having a discussion with a gallery. Be a trusted partner, you’re not there to party. You’re there in a professional capacity to help them sell, be professional. I hope that helps.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.


> Visit EricRhoads.com (Publisher of ArtMarketing.com) to learn about opportunities for artists and art collectors, including:

  • Art retreats
  • International art trips
  • Art conventions
  • Art workshops (in person and online)
  • And more!
By |2021-12-13T11:27:18-05:00January 10th, 2022|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 100

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com. 

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains what type of paintings you might want to include the next time you enter a work for an art show; and how to beat the odds when you launch an online advertising campaign to sell your art.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 100>

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:
In the marketing minute I try to answer your questions, your marketing questions, of course, you can email [email protected] with your questions, and tell me your name and where you’re from. This guy didn’t, but we’ll answer his question anyway. It’s a question from Ray Richardson. Ray says, When entering an event for the first time, what type of paintings? Should I include? Landscapes obviously, but what about things like still lifes or pet portraits? Should my work be solely geared toward what attendees expect? Or should I show a wide variety? Since my interest varies? From vehicles to animals to landscapes to still life? Great question Ray. The one thing I think you have to be thinking about is when you’re first branding yourself, and you’re first getting out there, you want to stand for something but don’t stand for everything. You can confuse people by doing showing too much variety. Also, I think the answer lies entirely on the show. Most shows have criteria landscape show typically will want you to show landscapes and nothing else, maybe a figure or a portrait or at least a figure in a in a landscape. But always whatever you do, show your best work, try to get a third party opinion from a pro who can be objective and tell you if something isn’t your best work. Only put your best stuff out there. No matter if it’s a show or it’s online or anywhere else. Editing is important. People don’t understand unfinished paintings unless they’re artists and even then sometimes don’t notice it. They’ll just go Oh, that was awful. So show your best work no matter what. Whether you’re showing in person or online, you only have one chance to make first impression.

Next question, Lisa did this right? She gave her town Lisa Cunningham of Waverly Township, Pennsylvania sounds beautiful. I’m sure it is. Maybe we’ll paint there sometime. Lisa, she asks, I’ve been giving serious thought to launching an aggressive ad campaign, knowing that it will take repeated exposure of my work to yield results. That’s smart. However, I can’t help but think no matter how appealing a work of art might be to a potential collector, it’s still an expectation that they actually see the work in person before making a sale. Galleries in Art Fair satisfy this concept. But as you know, both are very unpredictable and attracting the right buyer. Well, everything’s unpredictable and the right buyer, but you can kind of beat the odds a little bit, Lisa, by going after a concentrated area, you know, concentration is really important. For instance, there are places that have concentrated audiences of people who are known art buyers, and you want people who are known art buyers in the kind of art that you sell. There’s no doubt in my mind that seeing a piece of work in person is best. And I think people need to see artwork, you know, people are seeing a lot of things on Instagram or Facebook, and they’ve never been to a museum and they’re judging it based on what they see. And when they see it in person, it just kind of brings tears to your eyes sometimes. So I think that, you know that would be best. And we all ought to do our best to get people out to see original art, but that’s a sign of the times. And you have to get attention and sell in every way possible. And it’s very common always has been for collectors and others to buy from an image, whether it’s a web image, which is more recent, or a Facebook or Instagram image. You know, galleries have done this forever. You know, they’ve done it from photographs, even they used to send catalogs before the web, and some of them still send catalogs. It’s a very, very normal thing collectors and buyers are very used to it. Photos of paintings have been used. As a matter of fact, I was looking through some old magazines from the 1800s art magazines. They were advertising paintings with etchings, not even photographs. So you know it’s been going on, it’s just not possible for everybody to see it in person. And usually the gallery if they mail it out, and the person doesn’t really fall in love with it, they’ll they’ll take it back, so I wouldn’t be too concerned about. Now let’s address your other question about ad campaigns. Well, I really you kind of had it down, Lisa. But I need to disclose first that I own some magazines that sell ads, but I’ll try to be objective anyway. I learned this a long time ago and I learned it the wrong way because I used to think that you could buy an ad an ad a single ad in a magazine that had a big audience and it would sell something it’s just simply not usually true. It’s usually true for an event or something specific time like that, but not necessarily for selling paintings and building a brand first you have to have repeated exposure. You have to assume that you are unknown and have to become known now you may be known in your town or your region, but you may not be known everywhere. Does Matter of fact, we, we did a thing with a very famous artist. One time we launched one video, we assumed this artist was known worldwide. But in reality, he was only known around New York where he lived. So we had to build a lot of repetition and build his brand before the video would sell. So the other thing is that there are a lot of artists who were once known who have stopped advertising. I know, people who advertised 10 years ago who stopped advertising. And we assume that everything is attrition with 10% of any audience in a single year, in in a bad economy at more might be more than 10%. So for instance, if somebody advertised 10 years ago, assumes everybody knows who they are 100% of the people have never heard of them. So that’s something that they have to be thinking about. So the the best way to overcome all of these issues is to relentlessly repeat, if you’re unknown, or you want to get known. This applies to everything, whether it’s a magazine, email, social media, or otherwise, one of anything typically doesn’t work. Sometimes, you know, carpenters can’t hammer a nail with one slam, usually, maybe have a big muscle, but it takes repetition. advertisings like the law of physics, for instance, imagine a battering ram on a castle door, a giant tree with a big weight and force can break that door down with just a few taps. But the smaller the tree, the more taps it takes, you have to repeat and repeat and repeat because you have to create attention, then get interest, then desire, then purchase. And by the way, if somebody doesn’t happen to like the one particular painting, you got to build your brand so that they know who you are. And then maybe one day, they’ll like one of the paintings, so many of my you know, some people might not buy for years, but that presence over years, builds your brand. I’ve got lots of stories, I’ll tell you some time anyway, the average person needs to see something seven times before they buy it, that means see it. Now, if they don’t see everyone that runs, that’s not going to do you any good. And of course, the average person isn’t going to buy every painting they see. Not even every painting they like. So it depends on how often and it also depends on a certain amount of luck, right? So you lose momentum. If you just do it once, wait a few months and then do it again. You gain momentum. If you do it, for instance, three times in a single magazine or like what advertiser did for us, it was a new gallery, he wanted to get noticed fast, he wanted to look big and important. So they were like the battering ram. They bought 10 full pages and fine art connoisseur in plein air. They ran them, everybody noticed it got a lot of attention. It worked right away. They got a lot of massive action because of that, because they were a big battering ram. So there are ways to overcome things. But they also stayed visible over time, and stayed on people’s radar for several years so that people would know who they are interesting. Once they got to the point where they felt really confident that everybody knew who they were. They stopped advertising everywhere. Within two years. They were out of business. I don’t know if there’s a correlation. But just saying right, so my best advice. Don’t do ads if you can’t repeat them a lot.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.


> Visit EricRhoads.com (Publisher of ArtMarketing.com) to learn about opportunities for artists and art collectors, including:

  • Art retreats
  • International art trips
  • Art conventions
  • Art workshops (in person and online)
  • And more!
By |2021-12-13T10:54:16-05:00January 3rd, 2022|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 99

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com. 

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains how to “visualize” your success and use this concept to make it a reality; and how to get past the habit of comparing yourself to other artists.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 99 >

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:
In the marketing minute I try to answer your marketing questions from our audience. Well, that’s you right? Email your questions to me [email protected], where you can message me text me whatever you want to do. I write them down that I use them in here. Here’s a question from Dwayne in New York. I don’t know his last name, but Dwayne, thank you. Dwayne says, I’ve heard you mentioned visualizing your success. Can you speak more to that? I’m not really sure what that means or how to start? Well, Duane, it’s really nothing new. Certainly not new. It’s been going on for a long time. Let’s start with the basic premise. What is in your head controls? Everything you know, Is your stomach ever turned into knots from worrier stress? Well, that’s coming from your head, you know, you’re worrying, right? The premise is that you want to control what’s in your head, you want to control your thinking, you want to control the negative thoughts and push them out. And you also want to get the positive thoughts and the things that you believe could be happening in there and think about him a lot. So that’s why it’s a good idea to set goals, it’s a good idea to read those goals on a regular basis, and to believe that you can do it. So you have to believe something before it can happen. And I think you need to dream it or at least think about it a lot to manifest it. Now, most people think that’s kind of a silly idea. And quite frankly, I used to think so too. But when you think about it, most of the things that we have made happen one way or the other have been because we’ve been thinking about it. And you know, by the way, a lot of the bad things that we sit and ruminate about end up happening. Why does that happen? I’ll tell you a story. 30 years ago, maybe longer than that I was exposed to this concept. And somebody said, create a poster with pictures of what you want, you know, things you want houses and cars, but also pictures that stand for things you want, like family or love. It’s called a visualization board. The idea is to look at it every day and imagine yourself doing it. Well. I thought it was crazy. Hocus Pocus, woowoo stuff. But I thought, well, what the heck, everybody’s telling me it works. I’ll try it. And I really wanted a Porsche. Yep. But I couldn’t afford one. I didn’t have the money, I had no way to get the money. I had a small, relatively struggling business. And so I cut out a Porsche. I didn’t do the whole board. But I cut out a Porsche. And I stuck it on the mirror in the bathroom. So I’d see it morning and night. And before long, I was kind of imagining myself in it, you know, you want to you want these things to be vivid, you know, what color is it? What’s it like on the interior, you know, that kind of thing. And so, I finally told myself, you know, maybe the way to get it is I could sell my business. And I kind of wanted to do that in a way and I would reward myself if I got a certain price for my business. So anyway, I had no prospects sighs matter of fact, I wasn’t even considering it before that. But a year later, after looking at that picture every day, I sold my business, I put money in the bank, and I bought that exact Porsche. I mean, it was the same color, the same model, everything that I had looked at, and interesting. It kind of came to me. In other words, you know, I was kind of looking but all of a sudden, this guy contacted me said, I hear you’re looking for a Porsche. I’ve got one. I don’t know if it’s what you’re looking for or not. And he sends me a picture. It’s like that’s it. So I went over, drove over ended up buying it. It was a used one. I didn’t buy a new one. But it was pretty cool. And anyway, it’s something that I had visualized. So I’ve kind of learned that. That’s a cool thing to do. I visualized the plein air convention, I visualized plein air magazine, I people told me it wasn’t possible. But I just kind of pushed that out of my head got the negatives out and said, You know what it is past possible I visualize this big growing plein air movement that’s happening. And so there’s so many things that can be impacted. It’s like it sets the tone and makes you work towards it something that you kind of are doing without realizing it, because you start believing and maybe in the beginning, you don’t believe it. But you start looking at that picture, you start thinking about these things. Next thing you know, you’re starting to believe it. So for the last year, for instance, I’ve been imagining myself going to China on a painting trip, and imagining that maybe somebody would pay my way. Wouldn’t that be cool? Well, that’s not even I guess about a year. And I get a call today from this guy. And he says, We want to bring you to China. I thought how cool is that? So when I’m driving to a meeting, I imagine exactly how the conversation is going to go how things will work out positively. And it usually happens. And I even imagined myself getting a national TV show and I bought into it so big I could totally imagine myself doing it and get it Got a major network? And within two weeks, I accidentally kid you not met this man. I said, What do you do for a living? He says, Well, I, you know, I’m a guy with this network. I can’t tell you which one yet. But anyway, I said, Well, I’ve got this idea for a show. And I told him, the idea is, let’s have a meeting on Monday. And then the meeting happened with his executives. And guess what I got, I got a deal. So that’s how this stuff works. And I really strongly believe it works. It just sounds so illogical. And I don’t understand it, I have no idea. I don’t know what’s going on behind the scenes, and, you know, the brain waves or spiritual or otherwise, but it’s a pretty cool thing. So if you visualize bad things they happen to so I try to push bad out of my head, you know, we all have negative thoughts. And I’ll tell myself, you know, it’s not like me to think that and I’ll just push it away. So anyway, that’s what visualization means.

Now, the next question comes from Carol, from the Gulf shore of Alabama, with a banjo on her knee. I’m sorry, Carol had to do it. She says, when I see the work of amazing artists, I feel like I’ll never be that good. How does one get past the inevitable comparisons we make to other artists? Carol, stop it. Stop comparing yourselves to others, not just in your artwork, but in everything, focus on yourself, being the best you can be? Well, you were I ever be as good as John Singer Sargent, the great master. I mean, how many really great masters are there really, you know, we’re probably not going to be that good. I mean, he had something special that most of us don’t have. I don’t want to be the negative thinker about that. But I also am, am being practical. He was a rarity. But we can still be great painters, or good painters, and maybe one day great, great painters. So you might be comparing yourself to someone who’s been painting for 50 years and has lots of experience. But who started out just like you struggling, you don’t know. You don’t know what they went through their struggles, their frustrations, who was teaching them the 1000s of hours they put in, you just don’t want to compare, you don’t necessarily want to go through what they went through. My dad once told me, son, somebody’s always got a bigger boat. In other words, no matter how good, how successful, how rich, how famous, how talented, there’s always somebody who has done more, you simply can’t get caught up in the comparison game. All you can do is study, work hard, put in the time, believe in yourself, get great mentors, and be happy with your progress. And a great way to do that is to look in reverse. What I mean by that is, look how far you’ve come. Look at what you’re doing today, compared to what you were doing five years ago, or 10 years ago. You know, sometimes I think, well, I really wish I had a better house or a better car. And then I kind of look back and I say, wow, look at what I’ve got compared to what I had 20 3040 years ago. I mean, I had nothing. I lived in a crummy little apartment little tiny. What do they call that studio apartment. I just did not dig it at all. And I thought I’ll never get out of there. And now I you know, I live in a nice house. And you know, it’s not a big giant mansion or anything like that. But I look back and I go, wow, this is a big improvement. So don’t compare yourself to others. It just doesn’t do any good. Get that out of your head. Stop playing that game. Be grateful for where you are and what you’ve got, and just continue to work hard.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.


> Visit EricRhoads.com (Publisher of ArtMarketing.com) to learn about opportunities for artists and art collectors, including:

  • Art retreats
  • International art trips
  • Art conventions
  • Art workshops (in person and online)
  • And more!
By |2021-11-15T12:49:54-05:00December 27th, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 98

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com. 

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains what you can do now to prepare for a successful new year; guidelines for selling art during the holidays; and if it’s worth it for artists to have a LinkedIn account.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 98 >

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

While in the marketing minute I try to answer your art marketing questions, email them to me, [email protected] That’s a new email address. That way they go straight to the art marketing questions. Before I get to questions, a quick thought the majority of us go into the year without a plan. And if we make plans, we tend to make them after the year starts. It’s like New Year’s comes, it’s like, oops, I better do something. My 2020 plans have been done for months. I work on them in July. And you still have some time. And I think you really want to take time with your plans. Don’t just whip whip them together in 10 seconds. You know, take a day take a couple of days. really be thoughtful. I take five days to work on my plans. Yep, 555 days, and I bring all my folks in and we talk about things together. So now’s the time to lay out your plan for the year. What are your goals, pick no more than three goals for the year. three big goals, big, big goals, right, and then prioritize them which one is most important, which is second most important, and so on. Then you build a plan to accomplish each goal we use what are called KPIs key performance indicators. These are the steps towards a goal the things you need to accomplish to accomplish a goal. So every goal has multiple steps. And sometimes those steps might be 50 things that you have to do throughout the course of a year. And then sometimes those steps have steps that you have to get to. So what would be an example of Step four, let’s say your goal is to sell $50,000 worth of paintings that means KPI would be you have to say okay, well, I have to sell so many paintings a month. That means I have to sell so many paintings a week. That means I have to sell so many paintings a day. If you’re focused on those numbers all the time, and you just pay attention to him. It’s like Well, I haven’t sold a painting today, I better get on the phone and see what I can do. I know that sounds oversimplified, but the idea is that you take everything and break it out into many steps. So your goals have many steps. If you accomplish three big goals for the year, you’re you’re doing a pretty good job. And and I don’t always accomplish three goals. But I always try to accomplish the number one goal. And everything I do in my business and in my life related to that goal is to drive that goal home. And so other things. So the reason that’s important because you get all these distractions, and you can say to yourself, well, am I paying attention to my goal? Or am I doing something that has nothing to do with my goals? Sometimes you have things you have to do, like you know, you have to feed the kids. So anyway, that’s one way to think about this.

Now, here’s a question from Nick, in Tybee Island, Georgia who says, with the holidays coming up, I’m considering a seasonal sale. Are there any guidelines for selling art at a discount for the holidays? Thank you, Nick. First, why are you instantly assuming you need to offer a discount? This is not a good practice. discounts are usually held for times when things are tough and not selling the holidays. Are when people are spending money. Yes, they do like discounts, there’s no question about it. But they’re not necessarily looking for discounts all the time, especially something like a luxury item, like a painting discounts or something we do in our heads. They’re not necessarily required in retail, of course, they create the perception of discounts. If you walk into, let’s say the limited, they always have, you know, normal price $100 today’s price $50 50% off, but that’s actually their normal price. So I suppose you can do that. But you know, rather than doing a sale just to a show, you know, I go to open Studios here in Austin all the time. And I don’t see anybody discounting work. I mean, there’s a demand for work and that type of thing. So don’t worry about the price right now. worry about getting people in the door. The more people in the door, the more demand you create on your product, and price is less of an issue. The key point is to get him into the studio early. Get the word out, do a mailing duty mailing, tell all your friends hold him tell him several times. You know, don’t just tell him once, hold a reception at your studio or at your house, invite everybody and then have somebody there to act as your salesperson so that you can simply twinkle to the crowd tell them the stories of the paintings, just merge meld with them and and just spend time with them. Stories sell paintings. I teach that in my art marketing Bootcamp, I think the number one video anyway, it’s kind of late to be planning it but you can still pull it off for this year. We’re all desperate for last minute ideas, especially fluent people. Who need last minute ideas? So get moving on this fast.

Next question is from Dean in Fort Worth, Texas who says, I know that Instagram and Facebook are popular social media sites for artists. But do you think it’s good to have a presence on LinkedIn as well? Or is that just for corporate networking? Well think think of it this way, Dean. First off, you have to be everywhere. If you’re on social media, you’ve got to be on social media, where your customers are, where are your customers? Well, you might be surprised they might be on LinkedIn, I there are big networking groups on LinkedIn for art collectors, their gallery networks on LinkedIn, there’s a lot of things that you can do to penetrate that world and be seen in there. So LinkedIn, I think, is a valuable resource. But my rule is, if I can’t do a good job, I don’t do it at all. You know, I do, I do a good job on Facebook, I do a good job on Instagram, I don’t do a very good job on on Twitter. And I don’t do a very good job on LinkedIn. I posted something there the other time, I think, for the first time ever, and it’s because I only have so much time and only so many resources. So pick the one that’s going to be best for you. Now, there’s this common misperception, and everybody just continually tells themselves This is the way to do things. And that misperception is that everybody who’s on your friend list is going to see every post the reality is only about 2% that are going to see it. So don’t expect them to see it. Also keep in mind, your friends are usually your friends, your acquaintances, and so there are people who are not necessarily your customers, so focus on customers.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.


> Visit EricRhoads.com (Publisher of ArtMarketing.com) to learn about opportunities for artists and art collectors, including:

  • Art retreats
  • International art trips
  • Art conventions
  • Art workshops (in person and online)
  • And more!
By |2021-12-13T11:04:43-05:00December 20th, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 97

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com. 

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains how to find the right buyer, and how to price your work “without feeling regretful”; and score insights on using acrylic versus oil, in regards to techniques as well as being able to sell the painting.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 97 >

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

In the marketing minute I try to answer your marketing questions and you can email those to me, [email protected] There’s a question from crafts art camp. They say how do you find the right buyer? And how do you price work without feeling regretful? Well, there’s two very different questions. First, everyone tends to get hung up on big audiences. But big isn’t necessarily what you want or need to find the right buyer. You need someone who has a concentrated audience of buyers, meaning art buyers, in your case, people who love art, people who have a history of buying art, for instance, my magazine, fine art connoisseur has over 300 billionaires who read it. And that’s, of course, just scratching the surface. And these are people who happen to love art happen to buy the kind of art that you do. And of course, they’re obsessive about art like we are. So finding the right place to advertise is really critical. That’s essentially how you solve that problem finding the right buyer. Okay. Now, the other question. I’m not so sure exactly how to answer that other question. You said in terms of pricing without feeling regretful, not sure what that means, regretful that you didn’t charge enough regretful that it was not more affordable for others. What does regretful mean. So I’m kind of going to take a guess at it. I have a theory, a stored painting makes no money. Unless it’s something I really want to keep for my personal collection, I’d rather get something out of it than letting it sit. A painting might help me pay for art materials or something else. So there are times to let it sit. For instance, if you’re building a body of work for a gallery show, you want to let it sit so that you can build up that gallery show, but paintings need homes, most artists tend to underprice their works and, and price themselves out of business. In other words, if you’re selling it for too little, you’re probably not getting what you need out of it. Because your expenses are probably higher than you know they’re starting out high isn’t always an option, either with a strong brand. Now, the bigger the brand, the bigger the value in the eyes of the collector, then you can get higher prices, like Scott Christianson can command about any price he wants. So can Clyde ASPA big because they are in high demand. And they get great awards and these big shows. And so I think that’s where we ultimately want to be. But that takes some time. It takes exceptional painting. And it takes extensive marketing and branding, you have to become a well known brand. Now, there’s a lot of different ways we can do that. But that’s what it really takes. And then you command big prices. But even those people probably got started out selling at lower prices when they were unknown. And their work wasn’t as sophisticated. So you’ve got to be thinking about, you know, get their first idea, build it up. You can’t necessarily start with high prices, it doesn’t usually work. You got to kind of ramp yourself up create demand, the more demand the higher the price, etc. It’s called demand pricing.

The next question is from Stacey best, who says I painted acrylics, specifically Open Acrylics. They have built in drying retardants. And is this a problem and becoming a professional? I observed that most workshops are for oil paints, does this exclude acrylic paint artists? No, no, no, Stacy, I know the product. It’s a very good product, I’ve used it, it behaves very much like oil paint. And it’s good for travel. Because you don’t need turpentine. Water Based oils also do the same thing except they’re not acrylic. So you have a choice. But you don’t have to have Terps that way, right. So there are a ton of very rich, very successful painters who use acrylics. A great painting is a great painting. There are tons of oil painters, but there are also tons of Acrylic Painters in the demos that you’ve seen maybe unstaged at the convention or maybe in the videos, you know paint operates acrylic paint operates pretty much the same way as oil paint, not exactly the same, especially something like Open Acrylics, which paints more like oils than traditional acrylics, but the techniques you see on video or on stage are pretty close to identical. I would say now I’ve used all these products myself, and so I have a feel for it, but don’t get hung up on that. I think a great painting you know there are great artists out there who are using acrylics or squash or Open Acrylics or a lot of different materials, watercolors Of course, some people say watercolors don’t sell as Well, but you know what, there are some artists out there commanding giant prices for their watercolors. So it has a lot to do with the quality of the painting, plus the brand of the artist which we just talked about, and that helps get those prices so just do great paintings and don’t get too hung up on it. You know. Now also you can talk to your gallery, some galleries might be hung up on it, and they might say I’d rather you do oils but I think if they see great paintings that are going to sell, they’re going to say welcome to my gallery. I hope these marketing ideas are helpful.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.


> Visit EricRhoads.com (Publisher of ArtMarketing.com) to learn about opportunities for artists and art collectors, including:

  • Art retreats
  • International art trips
  • Art conventions
  • Art workshops (in person and online)
  • And more!
By |2021-11-15T12:14:47-05:00December 13th, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 96

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com. 

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains why galleries might keep up to 40 or 50% of the sale of your painting; and what you should know if you’re looking for the single best way to sell your paintings.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 96 >

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

In the marketing minute I try to answer your marketing questions and you of course can email me anytime [email protected] Here’s a question from Darlene Wilson, who asks, is it worth to have your artwork sit in a gallery for long periods of time? And what should you get in return for the 40 to 50% they get from your sales, I have seen my friend spend a lot of money shipping and hanging shows and galleries even being asked to provide all the beverages and appetizers as well as their contact list, etc. Where is the line? Well, I gotta tell you, Darlene, a natural thing for people to do is to assume that these people are getting 50% for doing nothing. And I suppose there are probably some galleries out there that are doing nothing, but most of them are doing something and they’re doing a lot. You have to ask yourself, is it worth it? Now, quite frankly, I know an artist who’s given up 75%. And he’s just bust in the doors open, he’s selling so much. And he’s happy to give up a large amount of money because he’s making so much money on on gallery sales. If things sit and they’re not selling, maybe you want to have a discussion with the gallery, why is that? Are they showing your work? Are they getting positive reaction to it? Is it something that you should refresh, send them something new. Once in a while, I’ll pull something out of the gallery, and I’ll repaint it or touch it up or change something in it. Because I have fresh eyes after it’s been sitting a while and then maybe send it off to another gallery. The galleries really have a hard time nobody really understands the plight of the galleries. First off, it’s tougher than ever to make a living at a gallery. Sometimes I know galleries that are paying 25 and $50,000 a month rent in their locations, that means I got to sell a lot of paintings, you know 25 or $50,000 paintings or half that you know something like that for a break even plus they’ve got lights, you know, lights in galleries, the electric bills are massive, because of all the lighting. And they have marketing and advertising list building working clients, the cost of events, salespeople, commissions, cocktail parties, advertising, you know, you name it, they work hard for their money, do not ignore that fact. And a lot of people I know make a lot of money from art galleries, and some of them don’t some of MYRIN and some of them don’t. But you know, you got to work with your galleries, it’s a two way street, they need your help, and you need their help. And so I think that’s worthwhile. Now, of course, you can survive without galleries. But then you got to take on marketing yourself, the idea of having a gallery is that they’re selling for you when you sleep. And they’re selling for you when you’re painting. And your inventory could sit there a while everybody has hot and cold spells, you know, economies in different markets are good or bad. Or sometimes things change. You know, you might spend weeks or months or even longer periods of time I’ve had with my gallery have had hot and cold spells, you know, they’ll call me one time, that’s like three times in a row and in a month are like selling tons of paintings and all of a sudden, you know, they sit for a long time, and I don’t sell any for a while it just, it kind of depends. But they need to hear from you. They need you. They don’t need to hear from you complaining or whining or, you know, beating him up, you just want to kind of let them know what’s going on. They need to know your stories, they you know, send them an update of other shows that you’re doing or the things that you’re doing. So they have something to talk about, keep fresh in their mind, got to remind them a friend of mine sends chocolates to the gallery. Every time a salesperson sells something, he sends chocolates to reward that salesperson guess who he is going to promote next, or he or she is going to promote next right? So if it sits sits in your studio and sold, what’s the difference? If it’s sitting in the gallery, it’s being seen probably unless it’s in the back room. And by the way, I went into one of my galleries last summer and my painting was not out it was sitting in the back room and I asked why and he said it’s not very good. I decided not to put it up. I said I wish you told me you know I will take it back and fix it. But instead of just sat there and he didn’t tell me because he’s got so much other stuff on his mind. Good idea to rotate things in and out if they’re not selling. But anyway, sometimes a frame can make all the difference in the world too. But if you want to keep 100% I get that but doing that you’re taking on all the responsibility of marketing and is that the best thing you can do now I teach marketing I have helped a lot of artists, but it’s a lot of work you need to spend 20% of your time minimum and probably a little bit more if you want to really be successful and a good galleries worth their weight in gold. Seriously.

Here’s one from Bob in San Ramon If you could only do one thing to sell your art, what would it be? Well, Bob, if I think anyone should, I don’t think anyone should do one thing. You see, imagine the Parthenon, right, the building in Athens with columns on it’s got that triangle on top and the columns. Imagine, all the columns are gone except for one column in the middle. And it’s holding that big, heavy marble thing up. So now imagine a car slams into it, that column comes crashing down, the Parthenon comes crashing down. That’s what we call a single point of failure. And single point of failure is a flawed marketing strategy. If you want to succeed, you need massive action. That means you need lots of columns, you need all the columns all the way around the building, do as many as you possibly can multiple ways to reach people to touch people. If I had to start out with one thing, it would be list building, finding a list, creating a list of people who are truly interested in my paintings, and finding a way to stay in touch with them on a regular basis. Now, if you don’t have any money, you can do it by email, or you can do maybe a little with direct mail, that stuff works extremely well, but don’t live or die on a single point of failure. You need to do lots of things to market work, which is why it’s nice to have galleries working for you, that get the time it saves you. The other thing is, you know, artists these days are so distracted. You know, the thing that you’ve got to ask yourself is what’s the best and most effective use of your time. And the best and most effective use of your time as an artist is getting better as an artist and painting and doing as much painting. And all these people who are so busy doing other things that they’re not getting time to paint. I had a an artist tell me recently that she was not painting anymore, because she was doing so many workshops, she never had time to paint. Another artist told me that he actually came to us and said, I want you to do my videos for me because I don’t want to take customer service emails and calls and be running to the FedEx and UPS people all the time. Because I should be painting. And so you know, think about the things that are distracting you and actually actually what is the best use of your time? Well, the best use of your time is painting. The second best use of your time is figuring out how to make your business fly, which is communicating with your galleries or if you don’t have galleries focusing on your marketing.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.


> Visit EricRhoads.com (Publisher of ArtMarketing.com) to learn about opportunities for artists and art collectors, including:

  • Art retreats
  • International art trips
  • Art conventions
  • Art workshops (in person and online)
  • And more!
By |2021-11-15T11:58:16-05:00December 6th, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 95

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com. 

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains if you should separate your marketing/website for multiple artistic endeavors, such as painting and sculpting; and how to get your website in front of more people.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 95 >

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

In the marketing minute I try to answer your marketing questions which of course you can email to me, [email protected] This is a question from Kara. Head del Lago HD a l Gao hit a Lago. I’m sorry, Kara, I’m sorry, botched her name. She asked for those of us who work in multiple mediums should we separate our marketing? For instance, should a sculptor and a painter have two different websites? One for each? Well, Kara? I think it’s an interesting, interesting question. And I think it depends entirely on where you are in your career. If you’re known and established in one area, or both areas, I think you can get away with it. Artists are creative, they try to use different mediums Sargent did watercolor and oil. George George Carlson was a great sculptor, and then decided to move to painting. Richard McKinley, a brilliant pastels is also a brilliant oil painter, Cynthia Rosen a palette knife oil painter, also just recently started doing watercolor for travel, there really are no rules and you of course can do anything you want. The issue comes down to are you confusing the audience? I’m a big fan in marketing, a single focus when you’re branding and marketing, you know, so if you were to walk, walk up to somebody or awaken in their sleep and say, you know, what kind of a painter is Cynthia Rosen? The instant answer is, well, she’s a oil palette, knife painter. And so you want them to know what you are, you could argue there’s room for saying there’s that you’re lots of things. And that’s okay. But if you don’t want to confuse people, you might want to wait till you’re really selling well and very established, and then maybe kind of start talking about the other things you do doesn’t mean you can’t do them. And I would not do separate websites, show who you are, whatever it is. And you know, what matters most is that you’re showing great artwork and showing that you’re, you’re competent, and hopefully a great artist, and get known for something. And you know, consumers easily get confused. They’re not paying very close attention anyway. So there’s not a right or wrong, but I do think you could do in your sales a touch if you confuse consumers. So I hope that helps.

Next question comes from Cindy Lund, who says, I have a website, how do I get in front of other people? Well, I think that’s a good question, Cindy. I heard from a person recently who said, Now that I have a website, I’m surprised that you know, the phone has been ringing off the wall with people buying my art. Well, it’s just not the case, just having a website is kind of like having your name in the phonebook. It’s not going to do anything unless people are coming to it. They’re coming to it because they’re looking for you just like the phone book, or unless they stumble on to you by accident. Now that can happen are lots of ways to drive traffic. The first is organic search, meaning you show up in a search for another item, let’s say somebody does searches the term watercolor painting, and you show up on the you know, at the top of the water coloring, watercolor painting search, which is probably unlikely unless you’re really really, really getting a lot of hits, used to be easy to manipulate what they call SEO, which is search engine optimization. And it’s less easy today. Google now knows all the tricks and prevents them. But I’d suggest maybe you blog weekly on your site, make sure that lots of keywords are in it keywords being things that people would be searching for, like the term oil painting, or painting of children or whatever it is you do. And then if enough people read your blog, you’re going to show up more in search because if people are clicking on your website, Google’s going to note that so I would write your blog email link to your list your newsletter list or whatever, and hope that they they click on it. And you should be building a list anyway, we’ve talked about that in the past and you should be putting your blog on social media so people can click there and clicks from different computers will signal Google to help it show your stuff more they tend to reward success. driving people to your website isn’t enough though what you do once you get them there is a bigger question. And if you want to you want them to buy or to look or to take some particular action, then you need to optimize for that and that’s another subject for another time I talked about it in my book a little bit. Also, advertising is the most common way to drive people to a website. Remember that you want qualified art buying customers you know if you’ve got a lot of people who love art, but they don’t buy art that’s not going to do you any good. The my magazine for Since plein air magazine, the readers buy lots of art even the artists buy lots of art but you got the people who follow the circuit go to go to the plein air events the collectors, you know they’re buying art and they love plein air paintings and so that’s a good place to advertise and get them to come to your website. Or you know, my magazine, fine art kind of sir. Same kind of thing. You’ve got all these qualified art collectors. Even things like fine art today plein air today, realism today, American watercolor, the things that are going to reach the people who are going to buy are going to make a big difference, but you want audiences that are proven buyers. Because if you just grab audiences in general that’s just not help enough. You want things that are you want to reach people were going to buy.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.


> Visit EricRhoads.com (Publisher of ArtMarketing.com) to learn about opportunities for artists and art collectors, including:

  • Art retreats
  • International art trips
  • Art conventions
  • Art workshops (in person and online)
  • And more!
By |2021-10-07T11:50:48-04:00November 29th, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments

Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 94

In the Art Marketing Minute Podcast, you’ll learn how to sell your art, how to market your paintings, and everything else you need to know in order to have a successful art career. Each episode answers questions from artists by host Eric Rhoads, author of “Make More Money Selling Your Art,” publisher of several art magazines and newsletters, and author of ArtMarketing.com. 

In this Art Marketing Minute, Eric Rhoads explains if you should pay for a sponsored post on social media and, before you spend a dime, what to consider; advice for writing an informative and engaging artist bio.

Listen to the Art Marketing Minute Podcast: Episode 94 >

 

Submit Your Art Marketing Question:

What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.

FULL TRANSCRIPT of the Art Marketing Minute:
DISCLAIMER: The following is the output of a transcription from an audio recording of the Art Marketing Minute. Although the transcription is mostly correct, in some cases it is slightly inaccurate due to the recording and/or software transcription.

Announcer:
This is the Art Marketing Minute with Eric Rhoads, author of the Amazon best selling book, “Make More Money Selling Your Art.” In the marketing minute we answer your questions to help your art career brought to you by artmarketing.com, the place to go to learn more about marketing. Now, here’s your host, arts magazine publisher, Eric Rhoads.

Eric Rhoads:

In the marketing minute I try to answer your marketing questions and you can always email me those questions or anything else. I’m always there for you. I answer every single email [email protected] Here is a question from molucca mc. Art. I don’t know what that is, must be a Twitter handle or something. Malachy MC says, should an artist pay for sponsored posts? Or not? I’m assuming the question is about sponsored posts on social media like Facebook or Instagram. I have a rule before I spend a dime on anything. I try to determine the following things. And these are important get a pen. Number one, what is my goal and my expected outcome from my ad? What do I hope will happen? Am I trying to get people to look at my art? Am I trying to get them to subscribe to my newsletter? Do I want them to follow me? Do I want them to attend a workshop? What’s the one thing? Of course you want it all? But what’s the one thing? Because that determines how you do it? Secondly, how do I get at least double my investment back? If I spend $10, then I personally expect to get $20 back then hopefully a lot more. So what must happen for money to come back? What a lot of people find out when they ask themselves these questions is it’s not easy to buy on your website or on your social media, there may be things that are blocking. So if I’m not selling something on the spot, I have to ask myself, what’s the value to me? So the value is branding? Of course, it’s valuable to get them on your newsletter, of course, it’s valuable to get a name. But what if you get 10 people to subscribe and it costs $10 each? Is it worth it? Is it worth $100? Each? Is it worth $1,000? Each? How do you know? If you have no idea if they’re art buyers, art lovers who don’t buy, or artists who may not buy? Then don’t spend the money? Go to places that you can target who’s my exact target? How do I reach them? And then can I afford repetition? You see if you cannot afford repetition? You shouldn’t be advertising? Because repetition is one of the three legs of advertising the three legs of advertising is media market and message. What media are you using? What is the market? And what is the message and and the message really comes down to you know your headlines and the content. But can I afford the repetition repetition is so important. It’s rare that anybody responds to any marketing from one ad or one repetition. But if you can get somebody to see an ad seven to 10 times within a certain period of time, it can work really, really well for you. I’ve I’ve watched artists go from poppers to having a lot of money because they just stick with it, they have the repetition takes a while. But if you’re willing to be patient, that’s what you need to do repetition. And you also want to make sure that if you’re reaching the right kind of people, the kind of people who buy so if I can’t afford to make sure that the ad reaches the same person seven to 10 times, it won’t work. And typically, if I buy advertising, I buy advertising for long periods of time, I usually sign 234 year contracts. And the reason I do that is because I know that it’s that repetition over time that builds momentum over and over and over and over and over and over and over again. One time I got talked into buying an ad in an auction house magazine, and I thought well, I’m going to reach all these rich collectors and I’m going to sell a lot a lot of subscriptions to fine art connoisseur magazine, I ran a full page ad I paid many, many, many, many, many 1000s I think it was $18,000 for it. And I sold exactly two subscriptions. If I had to run that ad over and over and over and over again, I probably would have sold several 1000 subscriptions but I didn’t do that. And of course I didn’t need that big of an ad to do that. So I learned my lesson. That’s one of the ways we we all learn is that we’d make mistakes. So before you spend any money, don’t throw your money away without knowing your goals and wedding won’t know your outcome. There’s also a lot of people throw their money away with things like boost this post or sponsoring an ad yet they have no goals, no outcomes, no specific financial goals. And without those things you’re throwing money away whether it’s social media ads or ads in one of my magazines, fine art connoisseur plein air. It’s not smart business until you have a goal. My sales organization will take you through your goals and if you don’t Normally, they’ll help you understand what might be the right strategy to have in mind. So keep that in mind.

Next question is from David Wood. David says, do you have any advice on writing an informative and engaging artist bio? David, the answer is yes. Thanks for asking, I have a rule. My role is Zig, when everyone else Zags. I get sent and read or exposed to literally hundreds of artists BIOS, and I’m usually gone within 10 seconds, because they’re boring. There is a rule in all advertising and everything that you do, whether it’s your website, whether it’s your business cards, whether it’s your ads, whether it is your artists bio, everything you need to do, everything you do needs to have headlines that sell and selling is really relating to people finding something that really gets their attention, you need a headline that makes me want to read the rest of the copy it you have to assume that if they don’t read the headline, they won’t read the first line, if they don’t read the first line, they won’t read the second line, if they don’t, there’s a guy by the name of Sugarman, who wrote a book for Advertising Age, and he talks about this, he calls it the slide, you got to get people to read that headline, enough people to read it. And of course, if you’re doing email, you got to get them to read the subject line. If they don’t open this, if they don’t open the email, the subject line doesn’t get their attention. It’s not going to give them anything. So subject line, and then headline, then first sentence and so on. And once they kind of start reading, then they’ll keep reading, but you got to get them through that first paragraph, that second paragraph, and so you got to write things to pull them through, and artists BIOS tend to be really really boring. Now I have spent 10s of 1000s of dollars I’m not kidding 10s of 1000s of dollars taking courses and programs on MRI and reading books and watching videos on writing headlines. research says that without a strong headline, there’s only a 10% chance that someone will read anything further. When I’m writing headlines I sometimes will write 20 or 50 headlines before I decide which one to use don’t use the first two or three things you use keep coming up with ideas I tell myself if I can’t come up with 20 I’m not any good right so I write 20 headlines and then I go alright which is the best one which is going to get the most attention and and I have taken copy you know we sell a lot of videos and things I have taken copy on a on a product that bombed, rewritten the headline only and the first paragraph and all of a sudden that product was a huge success. That’s how much it matters. So it matters with your artists bio it matters with everything you do because your goal is to get people to read it to pay attention to you. So where I put most of my time is in writing and I’m friends with some copywriters who make literally millions of dollars in some get paid about 60 to $100,000 just for a single two page letter. That’s how important it is. You know, if you’re selling books online or vitamins or something, you know, a good letter can make the difference between 10,000 in sales and 10 million in sales. That’s how important it is. So these copywriters are worth every penny because they know how to sell things with words, each of us need to spend most of our time on our headline. And then on our first or second paragraph, when you’re writing an artist’s bio, or you’re writing your website or you’re writing your ad, it doesn’t hurt to get some professional help because I use professional help from time to time. Although I’ve I I’ve spent a lot of time learning and growing so that I can do them and make strong headlines. There’s also this concept of the slide right I talked about that a minute ago, imagine a playground you climb this slide, you get to the top and then you slide down and copy the headline is the top of the slide, or the first step on the slide. Second step is a powerful first sentence which leads you to the third step which is a second sentence, and then you get them to the top and then you get them over and then they slide down and then they buy. Alright. Now if I were writing a killer artists bio, I’d tell a powerful story. Because as I said, my Sunday coffee the other day, stories are one of the most effective forms of communication. No one buys on logic and get that out of your head. Logic does not exist. Logic facts, nobody cares. You’ve got to turn that into emotion. emotion is what works right? No one wants to hear that David Wood was born. In a log cabin on a lake, but if your headline said how a house fire let a young survivor to become an important artist, you get their attention, they’re going to read the next slide. And then you tell the story and you weave in everything you want them to know and you stand a much better chance of reading the whole thing. I talk a lot about this in my videos. I think the very first video has all the information on how to tell stories and how to write stories, and make stories about your artwork. Remember, making stories about your artwork and giving it to the gallery is really important because stories are easy to remember that can pass them on to collectors much easier to remember than facts. Ask yourself this. Also, what is the purpose of an artist bio, it’s really nothing more than a sales document. Its purpose is to make them want to own your work. It’s got to give you credibility, but it’s got to reach their heart facts don’t reach the heart. Facts are boring. Another thing always tell yourself to add, which means all right. So this is something that took me a long time to learn. You know, if you make a statement, let’s say I make a statement that says David Wood is one of the top artists that xxx in 2019. Which means you will be getting one of the best pieces of Western art in your collection, which will go down in history as an important piece of art. So if you make a statement, ask yourself how can I say which means now you can say it different ways. You don’t have to actually say those words. But try to find a way to translate for people don’t assume they’re going to know things on their own. Anytime you state something state the benefit to the reader or the buyer, which is why which means is important. also assume that they’re not going to read it at all. And if they only read the opening paragraph, can you accomplish something in the opening paragraph that is going to get them to be interested in buying your art. So like anything in marketing, and quite just like painting there’s a primary purse purpose a focal point right there’s a focal point in your artist bio. So I hope this marketing tip has been helpful went a little longer than normal.

Well, this has been the art marketing minute with me. Eric Rhoads. My goal in life is to eliminate the idea of the starving artists to help your dreams actually come true. So if you want to submit questions, simply email [email protected] And to learn more about marketing ideas, you can visit Artmarketing.com. Thanks for listening.

How to Submit Your Art Marketing Questions: What questions do you have about selling your art? Email Eric today at [email protected] (include your name and where you’re from) to hear your question answered on an upcoming Art Marketing Minute Podcast.


> Visit EricRhoads.com (Publisher of ArtMarketing.com) to learn about opportunities for artists and art collectors, including:

  • Art retreats
  • International art trips
  • Art conventions
  • Art workshops (in person and online)
  • And more!
By |2021-10-07T11:37:04-04:00November 22nd, 2021|Art Marketing Minute Podcast|0 Comments
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